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Getting rich on YouTube

Top Contributor
# 1
Top Contributor

I have noticed some things on YouTube that I think are worth talking about. After all people are making a business of posting videos to YouTube. I have heard more than one such person say things like well we started doing this as a hobby and now it's all we do or because of YouTube my kids are set for life they can have anything they want.

The people that I'm talking about create shows for kids especially little kids and the stars of the shows are themselves kids and their parents usually testing out candy on boxing toys playing with toys etc. Little kids eat these videos up my four-year-old loves them. In fact she loves them so much that she started her own channel vi’s Toy & game reviews.

These channels often have 1 million or more subscribers and get upwards of 1 million or more views for every video that they upload to the channel. Other channels, in fact a whole other areas, do not seem to fare so well.

This morning I was looking at some of the most popular business oriented channels on YouTube. Most of those are lucky to have 10,000 subscribers and only a few can boast over 100,000 views on any particular video. The most popular news channels on YouTube judging by today's popular videos in the news category only need to get a few hundred views to be at the top of that category.

So why the huge disparity in numbers between shows for small children and shows about things that would appeal to business people? I don't think that it is just an age thing I E business people are all too old and technophobic to watch video on YouTube. That makes no sense because people who grew up in the 90s and beyond are becoming (or are already) adults and have their own businesses both on and off the web so the audience should be there for business related topics. Even Google’s own channels who you could expect to be some of the most visited are lucky to get a few hundred to a few thousand views on any one video even though they might have several million subscribers to the channel.

Is it just format? Mostly everyone who tries to do a business oriented channel approaches it as though it were television and tries to make a set or something formal like that as the setting for the show. The popular kids shows on the other hand are all pretty minimal as far as sets go and tend to shoot things out in the wild on the fly for the most part. Would this style appeal the folks looking for business information?

I don't know since people are getting rich and making a business of posting on YouTube it seems like answering these questions would be valuable. I mean there's all sorts of cool stuff like what if you could fund your start up via a show on YouTube that be awesome it would take lenders out of the equation or investors for that matter and let you make your own money that would be freaking cool.

 

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Re: Getting rich on YouTube

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor
Well.... I have a YouTube Channel for my hobby. I started October 31st 2014 and reached over 10 million views with 22,000 subscribers. You don't make very much money unless you accept promoting sponsors.

YouTube is mainly for entertainment. No matter how hard I work on my guttulus channel (marketing) it will never get the views my hobby channel (magic the gathering) will get. The younger demographics also plays an important role.

Re: Getting rich on YouTube

Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆
# 3
Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆
I always love to read about the stories of people who made it big on YouTube and there are such a wide variety of successes. One thing that many of them have in common is they try to engage users at an emotional level that businesses often overlook. This is particularly effective on kids who are easily excited and impressed, but can apply to adults as well if you can capture their interest.

We babysit our friend's son often and I cannot tell you how many hours he has spent watching videos from Dude Perfect, nerf battle, and Minecraft stunts. All of which have millions of view and the producers no longer need their day jobs. There are also most professionals who have made a living on YouTube, such as the America's Got Talent contestant violinist Lindsey Stirling or the plumber Colin Furze who have grown such an active audience that they have become celebrities.

My point is this, a lot of these people start out as a hobby with lots energy and passion that others find it easy to relate to on a personal/ emotional level. This is called pathos for those interested in the communication or persuasion fields. If you have the time, energy, and drive it is possible to generate engaging content for just about anything you are passionate about. The trick is finding your niche and learning to tailor your videos to your audience.

Re: Getting rich on YouTube

Top Contributor
# 4
Top Contributor
So you're essentially saying success on YouTube is not about blazing a new trail rather inviting others to watch you make your way Down the same trail that everyone else uses

Re: Getting rich on YouTube

Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆
# 5
Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆
It is all subjective to the individual. I am not suggesting we all become copycats when producing videos, but you can just as easily take something and make it your own. This is why some people will find success on YouTube and others will not. You have to know your audience and how to engage with them. Many of us think we know our audiences, but few are able to achieve a personal connection with them.

Overall businesses are often so focused on themselves and shouting how great they are, but ignore the underlying interests of views.

Re: Getting rich on YouTube

Top Contributor
# 6
Top Contributor
Great observation and probably worth an entire conversation of its own

Re: Getting rich on YouTube

Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆
# 7
Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆
Not to be overly simplistic, but I'd say charisma is the difference. It touches on points everyone made, but what it really gets down to is can you sell whatever it is you're talking about? Sales are all about making some kind of connection, they're more emotional than logical (as much as we would like it to be otherwise) and that has been true since Bernays coined the term Public Relations and brought psychology to the world of marketing. Public speaking is the number one fear in the world, so there are a lot of people out there who are amazing professionals and business people but who would be hard pressed to come off as anything but a nervous amateur in a public speaking setting.

I think of it like old school local business commercials. I think we all had that one furniture or jewelry or used car salesman in our town who found some stupid, corny schtick and just ran it into the ground for decades, but somehow they made it work because they sold it, they owned it; every time you saw one of their commercials you smirked or snickered a little but there's a grudging respect for their just going for it. I see youtube the same way. You'll have ten thousand people doing pretty much the exact same thing, but you'll end up with a handful who just dominate and nine times out off ten they're the ones that seem to own what they're doing most with a (seemingly) genuine passion. That's my two cents anyway.