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psychology behind "vs" between different products

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# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Hello All,

 

First post here in the forums. My question is a bit complicated and I thought this might be the best place to ask. If not, let me know which group would be good to post the following question in:

 

My client has been inquiring about the psychology behind “vs” between different products.

 

When looking at searches for “client versus competitor” and “competitor versus client” (note the reverse ordering), my client’s feeling is that these are two different customers. He states:

 

  • The thought is that one customer is using or favoring "competitor", while the other searcher is using or favoring "client".  I think the relevancy of the landing page is different enough that we should address them separately.  The question is which is which.
  • My feeling is that the first one is an brand loyalist as she/he has become aware of "competitor" and wants to compare to see if it is as good and the client's product which he/she knows. The reverse is true for other one.  

 

Can anybody point me in the right direction or provide some sources that might support this information? That would be a huge help! Thanks Google Community!

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Accepted by Mini-CM (Community Manager)
December 2015

Re: psychology behind "vs" between different products

Top Contributor
# 3
Top Contributor

Hi @Perform I I'm not as convinced there'd be strong evidence in either direction.  I can understand the thinking - that if you're loyal to "client" you'd type that name first, but I think you could also argue that if the searcher has a competitor in mind, they'd type that name first.

 

You'd need a lot of data to form any kind of statistical relevance and I suspect it may be virtually useless anyway.  For example, let's say you are able to determine through some sort of survey that 70% of the time a query matching "client vs competitor" comes from an existing client.  If you send these clicks to a "client focused" landing page, 30% of the time that's going to be the wrong one.  You'd need the data to show a very high confidence - well up towards 1.0 - before it'd be worth directing to a specific page.

 

One thing you can do, of course, is use Audiences.  If you have an Audience list of all your existing customers you could run these search terms in two separate Groups and exclude existing customers from one of them and target existing customers in the other (exclusively - Target and Bid).  That way you'd be able to use different landing pages and then analyse the performance of the different Keywords over time.

 

Jon

AdWords Top Contributor Google+ Profile | Partner Profile | AdWords Audits

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Re: psychology behind "vs" between different products

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Hi @Perform I

Honestly, this is more a "philosophical " / theoretical  question for an academic  research Dan Ariely's style... Smiley Surprised

In practice, Google recognizes both  versions,  and I would not put much thinking into this. I am sure Google has data, whether one version is preferred over the other. But, Google does not disclose the data, and if it were, I doubt that there would be any theoretical explanation other than a statistical one...

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer’
Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by Mini-CM (Community Manager)
December 2015

Re: psychology behind "vs" between different products

Top Contributor
# 3
Top Contributor

Hi @Perform I I'm not as convinced there'd be strong evidence in either direction.  I can understand the thinking - that if you're loyal to "client" you'd type that name first, but I think you could also argue that if the searcher has a competitor in mind, they'd type that name first.

 

You'd need a lot of data to form any kind of statistical relevance and I suspect it may be virtually useless anyway.  For example, let's say you are able to determine through some sort of survey that 70% of the time a query matching "client vs competitor" comes from an existing client.  If you send these clicks to a "client focused" landing page, 30% of the time that's going to be the wrong one.  You'd need the data to show a very high confidence - well up towards 1.0 - before it'd be worth directing to a specific page.

 

One thing you can do, of course, is use Audiences.  If you have an Audience list of all your existing customers you could run these search terms in two separate Groups and exclude existing customers from one of them and target existing customers in the other (exclusively - Target and Bid).  That way you'd be able to use different landing pages and then analyse the performance of the different Keywords over time.

 

Jon

AdWords Top Contributor Google+ Profile | Partner Profile | AdWords Audits