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compering match types

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# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

If I have three identical keywords each one with different matchtype and different bid, For example:

nice hotelbid:8

"nice hotel"bid:7

[nice hotel]bid:6

 

How do I know what keyword adwords will choose? what is more important, the matchtype or the bid?

2 Expert replyverified_user

Rather than going on and on about keyword match types and...

Badged Google Partner
# 2
Badged Google Partner

Rather than going on and on about keyword match types and adrank, have you read through the adwords help documentation yet? I know it's a lot to take in, but it's a lot easier to grasp the material once you have an active account to look at. My advice, would be to temporarily pause your campaign(s), until you get a little more familiar with the basics.

 

Overview:

http://support.google.com/adwords/?hl=en

Bids/budget:

http://support.google.com/adwords/bin/topic.py?hl=en&topic=1713956

 

Ultimately, it is not keyword match type, or bid alone that determines whether or not an ad is shown for a particular query. There's a lot more to it than that. Smiley Happy

Tom

Hi gelshtei,   Generally speaking, Google expects the bid...

Top Contributor
# 3
Top Contributor

Hi gelshtei,

 

Generally speaking, Google expects the bid to be higher on the more specific mathc types. And that actually makes sense. Google would esxpect to see something more like this:

 

nice hotel  bid:6

"nice hotel" bid:7

[nice hotel] bid:8

 

Why does this make sense? As broad match, your ad could show for any query that includes either nice (or synonyms) or hotel (or synonyms) and the query words can be in any order. As phrase match, your ad would only show for queries that include nice hotel, in that order. As exact match, your ad would only show for queries of nice hotel (nothing more, nothing less). It stand to reason that broad match has a lower value to you and your bid would be correspondingly low. The exact match phrase shows your ad only to people who specifically t typed in "nice hotel". That should be your most valuable traffic.

 

In your case, with the bids as outlined by you, if a person were to enter a query of "nice hotel", all three of your keywords are eligible. If the QS is the same for all three keywords, the broad match term would be triggered. It's all based on ad rank. The simple formula for ad rank is bid * QS. The one with the higher ad rank will be the keyword that triggers your ad. Many times, advertisers will separate keywords by match type into separate AdGRoups. Broad match group would show the most general text advertising your product/service. The exact match group would have ads that specifically target that keyword.

 

It is generaly best to bid higher on the phrase match and higher yet on the exact match. That all depends on your ROI for the match types. I would think if the exact match doesn't convert as well as the phrase and/or broad match, you might not want the exact match at all. You'll need to look at the data and make that decision on your own.

 

Best of Luck!

 

Pete

 

petebardo -- Deadhead doing AdWords

When several keywords match a search query, which one is used?

Top Contributor
# 4
Top Contributor

@Pete;

I might have missed  parameters in gelshtei's question:

 

He has the same keywords with different mach type. You wrote:

  • "...In your case, with the bids as outlined by you, if a person were to enter a query of "nice hotel", all three of your keywords are eligible. If the QS is the same for all three keywords, the broad match term would be triggered.... The one with the higher ad rank will be the keyword that triggers your ad"

 

Where as, in this case (when all keywords are eligible, and differ only by match type) the most restrictive one wins .

The QS*bid= ad rank serves to rank an ad, among other ads (taking part in an auction), ONLY after a keyword is selected to trigger an ad.

There is an exception (to "restrictive keyword wins"), in an uncommon case, in which ad-rank "takes-over", even if another keyword matches the query more closely. That would happen ONLY if that keyword is cheaper: This is NOT the case in gelshtei's example.

 

What did I miss in the info/ parameters given?

 

-Moshe


Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
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Thanks! Your information was very helpful.

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 5
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Thanks!

Your information was very helpful.

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by Karl (Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆)
September 2015

Hi MoshTLV,   On the old forum this question came up freq...

Top Contributor
# 6
Top Contributor

Hi MoshTLV,

 

On the old forum this question came up frequently: "Why is the broad match ad group triggered instead of the exact match when the user's query is the same as the exact match keyword?" After digging around we found that if the two keywords have the same bid, "the more restrictive one wins", as you mentioned. In this case, the OP has a higher bid on the less restrictive match type. When an account is set up this way, the keyword with the higher bid is triggered. It seems Google trusts advertisers to bid higher on the keywords that perform better for the advertiser and that the advertiser would bid higher on that keyword.

 

Google calculates the QS for every query. In this case, the query matches each match-type, so they will all get a QS for the exact match. In other words, in this case, all three match types will have the same QS, so the one with the higher bids wins and enters the auction for the impression.

 

The answer we got back from Googlers on this is the the more restrictive match type is triggered only when the bid is higher than the less restrictive type. It makes sense to me. Why add the exact match type if it doesn't perform better? If it performs better, it should be worth a bit more money for the click.

 

I hope this doesn't confuse the OP!

 

Pete

 

petebardo -- Deadhead doing AdWords

Broad match triggers ad due to higher bid

Top Contributor
# 7
Top Contributor

Pete;

What you are saying is very interesting and significant

  1. Can you still find the link to that Google confirmation on "restricted match type triggers only if bid is higher"?
  2. Do you have any idea why the help center article hasn't been updated ? I have found a recent blog (Oct 2011) that still refers to, and follows the help center on that.

 

--Moshe

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer’

Oops! Looks like I quite missed the point of the initial...

Badged Google Partner
# 8
Badged Google Partner

Oops! Looks like I quite missed the point of the initial question. Smiley Happy

 

"Google calculates the QS for every query. In this case, the query matches each match-type, so they will all get a QS for the exact match. In other words, in this case, all three match types will have the same QS, so the one with the higher bids wins and enters the auction for the impression."

 

Is this essentially "pegging" the quality score to the exact match? 

 


"the more restrictive match type is triggered only when the bid is higher than the less restrictive type."

 

So, the QS of the broad/phrase term is set by the QS of the exact term, but you have to bid higher for the exact term to get an ad to show for that exact query. I think that explains a lot of what I have, or rather haven't seen lately... 

Tom

Moshe, This was in a thread (or more) on the old forum. I...

Top Contributor
# 9
Top Contributor

Moshe,

This was in a thread (or more) on the old forum. I don't know whether we can still access that. Important posts were to be migrated here. A quick Google search did not find this.

 

Tom,

I can't say that the broad match QS is always pegged to the exact match. In this case it is because the query is the same as the exact match. Googlers explained they "assumed" the more restrictive match type would have a higher bid when writing the docs on this.

 

Basically, what I surmise, from the information we have available, is that Google first checks to see if you have any keywords that would trigger your ad. If the answer is "more than one keyword", the keywords that would trigger the ad impression enter a sort of "account auction". In other words, the ad rank for each eligible keyword is calculated and the keyword with the highest ad rank enters the general auction for impressions.

 

Pete

 

petebardo -- Deadhead doing AdWords

Re: Moshe, This was in a thread (or more) on the old forum. I...

Participant ✭ ✭ ✭
# 10
Participant ✭ ✭ ✭

This question has been given an extensive answer by an engineer at th AdWords blog: http://adwords-mena-en.blogspot.co.il/2011/10/when-several-keywords-match-search.html

 

Make sure you read all 3 parts! (that is just the first one)