AdWords is now Google Ads. Our new name reflects the full range of advertising options we offer across Search, Display, YouTube, and more. Learn more

Ads
2K members online now
2K members online now
Improve your Google Ads performance and boost your ROI, CTR, and Quality Score
Guide Me
star_border
Reply

bmm has higher QS than exact

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Hi all,

 

So, I just set up a campaign with a lot of broad match terms as well as exact terms. THey're kept in the same ad group (i know some like to split them out, but I don't). And that's not the point - something strange is happening.

 

First, I see the broad match Quality score jump when I add th "+". Litterally, it jumps from 4 to 7 (for instance) - and the modified broad matches now have higher QS than the exact matches, which are bid higher.

 

Here's an article I found on the matter:

 

http://www.searchenginejournal.com/why-is-google-penalizing-my-exact-match-keywords/45838/

 

Looking to see if anyone else has asnything to share?

 

 

1 Expert replyverified_user
3 ACCEPTED SOLUTIONS

Accepted Solutions
Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by MosheTLV (Top Contributor)
September 2015

Re: bmm has higher QS than exact

Collaborator ✭ ☆ ☆
# 2
Collaborator ✭ ☆ ☆

Hi jannerbasse,

 

I've noticed differences in QS when you edit a keyword but it normally goes back to what it was not long after the change.

 

The QS is calculated on the exact match of the keyword so it shouldn't vary within your campaigns.

 

Have a look in a couple of days and see if it is still different.

View solution in original post

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by Zee (Community Manager)
September 2015

Re: bmm has higher QS than exact

Top Contributor
# 3
Top Contributor

Hello jannerbasse;

To follow with purefuzz;

 

The QS you are given initially when adding a new keyword, in based on other advertisers QS, for the exact match type of a given KW. This is done since your account doesn't have enough performance statistics for that KW (when initially added). After your campaign reaches 1000 impressions the QS is mainly based on your campaign's performance CTR.

 

 

Read more:

Ingredients of the Quality Score sauce

 

 

-Moshe

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer’

View solution in original post

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by Zee (Community Manager)
September 2015

Re: bmm has higher QS than exact

Explorer ✭ ✭ ✭
# 4
Explorer ✭ ✭ ✭

From the article:

>> then Google will reward you by raising your quality score for that keyword

 

This sort of thing always makes me fume when I hear it, especially coming from someone who's supposed to be an expert. It's not Google who raises your QS, it's you with improved ads. Google has nothing to do with it. OK, maybe semantics but the writer makes it sound like all you have to do is use exact match keywords or whatever they say. They always ignore the most important aspect of the system and that is the ads themselves. Keywords don't make people click, ads and what they say do.

 

The fallacy is also to think that exact match will be lower in cost. Nobody explains why that would be or why they think so. It might but not necessarily. Looking at the chart of the article, his QS are in the 4-5 range which is below average. I will assume he has different ads for each campaign. Of course QS will be different!

 

Also from article:

>> It appears instead that Google just wants you to build some poorly structured, broad match campaigns

 

Google wants advertisers to build the best campaigns possible. That's what the QS is all about. The system takes care of itself for both the advertiser and Google who makes more money from those advertisers with good QS.

 

Adwords is also self-served and Google does next to nothing to help. Why should they? They are not there to build your campaign for you the best way possible. They simple provide the vehicle for you to advertise on their network. Other media don't do it either, they simply take the ad and money from the advertiser.

 

Because it's self-served, you do have most advertisers jumping in with both feet without understanding the system and consequently do poorly. But that is not Google's fault.

 

Rant over, let's see what's happening.

 

I won't go over the details of how QS is calculated. I and others have mentioned it many times before. But it's important to know that the same keyword in the three basic match types will all have the same QS. The following, in the same group, will always have the same QS:

 

my keyword

"my keyword"

[my keyword]

 

The reason is that Google treats each keyword (the phrase itself) the same, as if it was an exact match. Even the broad match's QS will be calculated on the exact match's data. That is, QS of all keywords, no matter the type, will calculated based on the data of all exact searches.

 

BMM keywords are different apparently and I've noticed that myself on occassion. The system doesn't seem to remove the + signs and use what's left of the keyword. They are their own keywords independent of the others.

 

I also believe that if you have a broad match with the same words in a different order, they will also have their own QS. After all, "widget plastic" and "plastic widget" are different keywords.

 

Also important to remember is that, as said before, ads are what gets people to click. If you put different match keywords in different groups, even with the same ad (which would not make sense), they may have different QS. To the system, they are different ads and keywords and will have different statistics and hence, different QS. Because QS is shown as an integer, they may look the same but in the background, where it is calculated to many decimal places, they may be very different. Assuming the same competitor (whose bid doesn't change), the CPC on a QS of 7.0 vs 7.5 can be quite large. The other large variable of course is that you likely don't have the same competitor.

 

So, to resume, I don't think it strange at all. Google is not penalizing anyone. Just the system at work based on your past results and the market at the moment your ads are served. It's not something I'd worry about. Instead, focus on improving your campaigns any way you can, not why BMMs have a lower CPC than exact match.

View solution in original post

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by MosheTLV (Top Contributor)
September 2015

Re: bmm has higher QS than exact

Collaborator ✭ ☆ ☆
# 2
Collaborator ✭ ☆ ☆

Hi jannerbasse,

 

I've noticed differences in QS when you edit a keyword but it normally goes back to what it was not long after the change.

 

The QS is calculated on the exact match of the keyword so it shouldn't vary within your campaigns.

 

Have a look in a couple of days and see if it is still different.

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by Zee (Community Manager)
September 2015

Re: bmm has higher QS than exact

Top Contributor
# 3
Top Contributor

Hello jannerbasse;

To follow with purefuzz;

 

The QS you are given initially when adding a new keyword, in based on other advertisers QS, for the exact match type of a given KW. This is done since your account doesn't have enough performance statistics for that KW (when initially added). After your campaign reaches 1000 impressions the QS is mainly based on your campaign's performance CTR.

 

 

Read more:

Ingredients of the Quality Score sauce

 

 

-Moshe

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer’
Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by Zee (Community Manager)
September 2015

Re: bmm has higher QS than exact

Explorer ✭ ✭ ✭
# 4
Explorer ✭ ✭ ✭

From the article:

>> then Google will reward you by raising your quality score for that keyword

 

This sort of thing always makes me fume when I hear it, especially coming from someone who's supposed to be an expert. It's not Google who raises your QS, it's you with improved ads. Google has nothing to do with it. OK, maybe semantics but the writer makes it sound like all you have to do is use exact match keywords or whatever they say. They always ignore the most important aspect of the system and that is the ads themselves. Keywords don't make people click, ads and what they say do.

 

The fallacy is also to think that exact match will be lower in cost. Nobody explains why that would be or why they think so. It might but not necessarily. Looking at the chart of the article, his QS are in the 4-5 range which is below average. I will assume he has different ads for each campaign. Of course QS will be different!

 

Also from article:

>> It appears instead that Google just wants you to build some poorly structured, broad match campaigns

 

Google wants advertisers to build the best campaigns possible. That's what the QS is all about. The system takes care of itself for both the advertiser and Google who makes more money from those advertisers with good QS.

 

Adwords is also self-served and Google does next to nothing to help. Why should they? They are not there to build your campaign for you the best way possible. They simple provide the vehicle for you to advertise on their network. Other media don't do it either, they simply take the ad and money from the advertiser.

 

Because it's self-served, you do have most advertisers jumping in with both feet without understanding the system and consequently do poorly. But that is not Google's fault.

 

Rant over, let's see what's happening.

 

I won't go over the details of how QS is calculated. I and others have mentioned it many times before. But it's important to know that the same keyword in the three basic match types will all have the same QS. The following, in the same group, will always have the same QS:

 

my keyword

"my keyword"

[my keyword]

 

The reason is that Google treats each keyword (the phrase itself) the same, as if it was an exact match. Even the broad match's QS will be calculated on the exact match's data. That is, QS of all keywords, no matter the type, will calculated based on the data of all exact searches.

 

BMM keywords are different apparently and I've noticed that myself on occassion. The system doesn't seem to remove the + signs and use what's left of the keyword. They are their own keywords independent of the others.

 

I also believe that if you have a broad match with the same words in a different order, they will also have their own QS. After all, "widget plastic" and "plastic widget" are different keywords.

 

Also important to remember is that, as said before, ads are what gets people to click. If you put different match keywords in different groups, even with the same ad (which would not make sense), they may have different QS. To the system, they are different ads and keywords and will have different statistics and hence, different QS. Because QS is shown as an integer, they may look the same but in the background, where it is calculated to many decimal places, they may be very different. Assuming the same competitor (whose bid doesn't change), the CPC on a QS of 7.0 vs 7.5 can be quite large. The other large variable of course is that you likely don't have the same competitor.

 

So, to resume, I don't think it strange at all. Google is not penalizing anyone. Just the system at work based on your past results and the market at the moment your ads are served. It's not something I'd worry about. Instead, focus on improving your campaigns any way you can, not why BMMs have a lower CPC than exact match.

Re: bmm has higher QS than exact

Top Contributor
# 5
Top Contributor

Ohhhh....Lucid_Marketing; You really put the time to read it all the way till the end...Smiley Surprised

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer’