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adwords budget

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# 1
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Are the no. of impressions dependent upon a person's budget?

 

For example, let's say there are 2 people & both bid equally on the same keyword. But the daily budget of one person is double that of the other one. Will that be somehow a factor in the no. of impressions shown in a day?

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Accepted by Lakatos (Top Contributor)
September 2015

Re: adwords budget

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# 3
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Hi Vineet, I hope Lakatos doesn't mind me stepping on his toes but budget is one of my favourite AdWords topics...

 

My much shorter answer is Yes, most of the time.

 

It's easiest to understand if you try and think like AdWords.  You've been asked to spend, say, $100 a day on clicks and you know that each click costs $1 so you can afford 100 clicks per day.  You also know that this particular advertiser has a CTR of 10% so you know that you can show his Ads 1000 times (1000 impressions) because that should generate 100 clicks which will be his daily budget.  Fine.

 

However, because you're the all seeing Google AdWords, you also know that his Keywords could match 10,000 searches per day so you're only actually showing his Ad once in every ten searches.

 

In this situation, increasing the budget will allow the Ad to be shown more frequently, hence increase the number of impressions.

 

The only time budget increases don't increase impressions is where the budget (and all other factors, CTR, CPC, etc.) already allow for Ads to be shown for all possible impressions, e.g. there are 1000 searches per day and your Ad is already shown 1000 times.

 

The "Lost" columns in the AdWords interface are useful for checking your impression share and potential lost.  Look for them under Competitive Metrics when you customise your columns.

 

Jon

AdWords Top Contributor Google+ Profile | Partner Profile | AdWords Audits

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Re: adwords budget

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Hi Vineet,

 

When it has come to a particular computer simulated auction, daily budget is not a factor. However, the number of impressions you get during a day may of course be dependent on the daily budget in various other ways. Obviously if at a point of time Google thinks your budget can't support your keywords during the rest of the day they will start showing your ad intermittently. That will, of course, reduce the total number of your daily impressions *versus* a theoretical scenario where you have an unlimited daily budget.

 

Best,

Lakatos

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by Lakatos (Top Contributor)
September 2015

Re: adwords budget

Top Contributor
# 3
Top Contributor

Hi Vineet, I hope Lakatos doesn't mind me stepping on his toes but budget is one of my favourite AdWords topics...

 

My much shorter answer is Yes, most of the time.

 

It's easiest to understand if you try and think like AdWords.  You've been asked to spend, say, $100 a day on clicks and you know that each click costs $1 so you can afford 100 clicks per day.  You also know that this particular advertiser has a CTR of 10% so you know that you can show his Ads 1000 times (1000 impressions) because that should generate 100 clicks which will be his daily budget.  Fine.

 

However, because you're the all seeing Google AdWords, you also know that his Keywords could match 10,000 searches per day so you're only actually showing his Ad once in every ten searches.

 

In this situation, increasing the budget will allow the Ad to be shown more frequently, hence increase the number of impressions.

 

The only time budget increases don't increase impressions is where the budget (and all other factors, CTR, CPC, etc.) already allow for Ads to be shown for all possible impressions, e.g. there are 1000 searches per day and your Ad is already shown 1000 times.

 

The "Lost" columns in the AdWords interface are useful for checking your impression share and potential lost.  Look for them under Competitive Metrics when you customise your columns.

 

Jon

AdWords Top Contributor Google+ Profile | Partner Profile | AdWords Audits

Re: adwords budget

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# 4
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Thanks Cobnut.

 

Having dealt with AdWords for close to 2 months (and one round of account suspension), it has been my gut feel that Budget has a huge influence on proceedings. Of course, the amount you bid is another factor. 

 

I have one more observation & I would like to get reactions from all the learned people.

 

I have a keyword which pulls in very nice long tail queries at a very healthy CTR (close to 9%). But what mystifies me is that none of that translates to a good reading of my landing page. I have tried to develop my landing page with lots & lots of info. about my little consultancy, but despite such a good match between the query, keyword and my landing page, people are hardly spending any time on it.

 

Now, I have two theories regarding this:

a) I come from India, where people generally are averse to reading (as opposed to long verbal discussions), and that too long reading in English.

b) When people come from search network, they are generally in a hurry to have a "quick fix" solution. Why I am saying this is whenever people come to my site through organic search, they spend a lot more time.

Re: adwords budget

Top Contributor
# 5
Top Contributor

Hi Vineet, interesting question, and theories; I think there's some truth in all of them.

 

I certainly advocate shorter, punchier content for a landing page - going as far as actually using bullet points in some cases.  I always recommend having landing pages that contain the "key points" of the topic and that these then have links to longer content the visitor can choose at will.

 

It's interesting that you have a variance between paid and organic visits.  When this happens (in any metric) it usually indicates that the paid Ads are being shown to a different audience and/or that this audience is expecting something different. It would be worthwhile analysing (if possible) the Keywords that bring people in organically with the better visit time.

 

I'd just also say that time is very short on the Internet.  A visit time of 30 seconds may not seem like long but as an average that might actually be quite good for a web page.  Make sure you're not reading too much into what appears to be a short time but which is actually OK.

 

Jon

AdWords Top Contributor Google+ Profile | Partner Profile | AdWords Audits