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With Dynamic Keyword Insertion, is using Exact match only the safest/best way?

[ Edited ]
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Also, does one recommend seperating DKI keywords into their own separate ad group, or is it ok to group them with the other keywords in a targeted ad group?

 

And will the Search Terms report show which search queries triggered DKI's if using match types other than exact?

 

Thanks

1 Expert replyverified_user
3 ACCEPTED SOLUTIONS

Accepted Solutions
Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author dogtown
September 2015

Re: With Dynamic Keyword Insertion, is using Exact match only the safest/best way?

Badged Google Partner
# 2
Badged Google Partner

You got it right. I would suggest exact matched ad groups for DKI. That is the best way to control what you are showing the searchers. You will then dynamically insert only the keywords you have in your keyword set. Big companies like Amazon, Target, and eBay still run into issues with embarrasing DKI matches, so it's best to be careful about how you set this up.

 

I would also suggest testing your DKI ad with a static ad. I have seen performance differ from campagin to campaign, and ad group to ad group. DKI isn't always the right...or wrong answer.

 

Also, don't forget your "keyword" capitalization / camelcase options below:

 

  • keyword:="red shoes"
  • Keyword="Red shoes"
  • KeyWord="Red Shoes"
  • KEYWord="RED shoes"  *works for things like GE Healthcare
  • KEYWORD= "RED SHOES"

And yes, your search query report would still show the matching searches. So if you do use something other than Exact, you can build out your negative keyword list by using the search query report.

View solution in original post

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author dogtown
September 2015

Re: With Dynamic Keyword Insertion, is using Exact match only the safest/best way?

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 3
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

safest way - maybe

the most profitable - I don't think so

see details on dynamic keyword insertion

View solution in original post

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author dogtown
September 2015

Re: With Dynamic Keyword Insertion, is using Exact match only the safest/best way?

Top Contributor
# 4
Top Contributor

Hi Dogtown,

 

This something a lot of advertisers get wrong. DKI inserts the keyword on which you bid, not the search query entered by the user. Exact match is not necessary in order for your keywords to show exactly as you entered them.

 

I absolutely (and Google) recommend separating DKI ads/keywords from your non-DKI ads. In the DKI group, you only want to include keywords that will go well with the ad copy. In a non-DKI ad group, this is not an issue. If you have DKI ads in a group with keywords longer than will fit within the length limits of a line, those keywords will not be substituted and could be disapproved--put them in the non-DKI group. If you have keywords that would violate Google policies if included in the ad copy, put them in a non-DKI group.

 

Best of Luck!

 

Pete

 

petebardo -- Deadhead doing AdWords

View solution in original post

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author dogtown
September 2015

Re: With Dynamic Keyword Insertion, is using Exact match only the safest/best way?

Badged Google Partner
# 2
Badged Google Partner

You got it right. I would suggest exact matched ad groups for DKI. That is the best way to control what you are showing the searchers. You will then dynamically insert only the keywords you have in your keyword set. Big companies like Amazon, Target, and eBay still run into issues with embarrasing DKI matches, so it's best to be careful about how you set this up.

 

I would also suggest testing your DKI ad with a static ad. I have seen performance differ from campagin to campaign, and ad group to ad group. DKI isn't always the right...or wrong answer.

 

Also, don't forget your "keyword" capitalization / camelcase options below:

 

  • keyword:="red shoes"
  • Keyword="Red shoes"
  • KeyWord="Red Shoes"
  • KEYWord="RED shoes"  *works for things like GE Healthcare
  • KEYWORD= "RED SHOES"

And yes, your search query report would still show the matching searches. So if you do use something other than Exact, you can build out your negative keyword list by using the search query report.

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author dogtown
September 2015

Re: With Dynamic Keyword Insertion, is using Exact match only the safest/best way?

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 3
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

safest way - maybe

the most profitable - I don't think so

see details on dynamic keyword insertion

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author dogtown
September 2015

Re: With Dynamic Keyword Insertion, is using Exact match only the safest/best way?

Top Contributor
# 4
Top Contributor

Hi Dogtown,

 

This something a lot of advertisers get wrong. DKI inserts the keyword on which you bid, not the search query entered by the user. Exact match is not necessary in order for your keywords to show exactly as you entered them.

 

I absolutely (and Google) recommend separating DKI ads/keywords from your non-DKI ads. In the DKI group, you only want to include keywords that will go well with the ad copy. In a non-DKI ad group, this is not an issue. If you have DKI ads in a group with keywords longer than will fit within the length limits of a line, those keywords will not be substituted and could be disapproved--put them in the non-DKI group. If you have keywords that would violate Google policies if included in the ad copy, put them in a non-DKI group.

 

Best of Luck!

 

Pete

 

petebardo -- Deadhead doing AdWords

Re: With Dynamic Keyword Insertion, is using Exact match only the safest/best way?

[ Edited ]
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 5
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

It seems that petebardo is right

Re: With Dynamic Keyword Insertion, is using Exact match only the safest/best way?

Follower ✭ ✭ ☆
# 6
Follower ✭ ✭ ☆

Hi Pete,

 

my question is. If you would add a replacement text for keywords that wouldn't fit dynamically {keyword:Replacement Text Goes here} there would not be a reason for Adwords to disapprove the ad and/or keyword correct?

 

Thank you,

Re: With Dynamic Keyword Insertion, is using Exact match only the safest/best way?

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 7
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

No. If I got Pete right, he means that Google has trademark policy concerning keywords and ads. In some countries, you may bid for brand keyword, for example "sony vaio". But if you mention it in the ad text, than it will be a violation.

 

If you add a replacement text for keywords that wouldn't fit dynamically (for example, if they are too long), then google will just insert the default one.

 

Re: With Dynamic Keyword Insertion, is using Exact match only the safest/best way?

Follower ✭ ✭ ☆
# 8
Follower ✭ ✭ ☆

Thanks for clearing this up Bondov. Makes perfectly sense.

Re: With Dynamic Keyword Insertion, is using Exact match only the safest/best way?

Top Contributor
# 9
Top Contributor

You guys got it right. If the keyword (phrase) is too long to fit the line lenght limits, the default text will show. The trademark is a good example, if you're in a country that prohibits using another company's trademark in the ad copy. Your ad need to meet certain editorial policies as well. If the keyword insertion would violate those editorial policies, it could be disapproved.

 

 

petebardo -- Deadhead doing AdWords

Re: With Dynamic Keyword Insertion, is using Exact match only the safest/best way?

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 10
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

"Your ad need to meet certain editorial policies as well. If the keyword insertion would violate those editorial policies, it could be disapproved."

 

I just wanted to add an example that using keyword misspellings are fine, but will land you into trouble if these are in the DKI ad group since they would violate the editorial policies of proper punctuation and grammar in the ad copy.