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Wildcards keywords?

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

I am a process server and I'm surprised at some of the keyword broad matches that have a low quality score.  One that shows up is the name of the city with the words process server.  Can I change this to Anytown Process Serv ? Will that give me any variation of the word such as serving, service, server, etc?
Thanks!

2 Expert replyverified_user

Wildcards keywords?

Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆
# 2
Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆

Hi Ron

Broad matches generally have lower quality score than tight. Adding variations of words is a good idea, but also check why you get low QS. Maybe is not because of keyword but landing page experience or your ads are not relevant enough.

Wildcards keywords?

Top Contributor
# 3
Top Contributor

Close variants already included in a keyword. If you add close variants they will compete  and each (including its variants) will  be matched to a search term. The result could be overlapping of variants of the same keywords. So, my recommendation:  use the  most common form used in the business ( e.g. "Server")

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
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Wildcards keywords?

Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆
# 4
Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆

But @MosheTLV, using such common keyword for sure has expected CTR below average and will bring tons of unwanted impressions and traffic. In your example keyword "server" could be used in many different contexts. IMO it's far from precise targeting.

I also dissagree that your own keywords in  this same adgroup are competing  to each other - in my knowledge, Google is chosing only one keyword, which match to query, with the highest quality score.

Wildcards keywords?

Top Contributor
# 5
Top Contributor

@Łukasz S;

I did not mean to use "server" as a stand- alone keyword. The question was about using  a variant of a word as part of a keyword.

All keywords that can be matched to a query (either within an and the group or among ad groups ) compete.  Which keywords wins,  is a different question: Generally speaking, this would be the keyword with the highest ad-rank, but there are exceptions:

Recommended reading:

How similar keywords match to search terms

 

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer’

Wildcards keywords?

Top Contributor
# 6
Top Contributor

Hi Ron R,

You say some of the keyword broad matches have a low quality score. That's an indication of your problem right there. Unless you are using BMM, a query can match any single word within your keywords. I am assuming by "Anytown" you mean the town where you are located.

You could set up your keywords:

+Anytown +process +server

+Anytown +process +serving

+Anytown +process +service

 

I have no way of knowing whether serving and service are "close variants" of server. If you are using broad match without the modifiers (the plus signs), I would recommend you change them all to BMM. Then pay close attention to the search query reports. If you find a query that performs well, add it as either phrase or exact match, and raise your bid a bit.

 

As far as competing, both you and Moshe are correct. Similar keywords in a campaign or ad group will compete in an internal auction to find the one with the highest ad rank. That ad will then enter the general auction. They do not compete in the sense that they drive each others' costs up.

 

Best of Luck!

 

Pete

 

petebardo -- Deadhead doing AdWords