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Why are the bidding recommendations so inconsistent?

Follower ✭ ☆ ☆
# 1
Follower ✭ ☆ ☆

I am a German>English translator. I translate many CVs as well as contracts, web sites, etc. (Most of my ads are in German with German keywords and targeted to Germany, Switzerland and Austria, but I'm writing in English to hopefully reach the most people.) Some of the "best" keywords like the German word for "translation agency" (übersetzungsbüro) will receive a bidding recommendation of approximately USD 23 in the keyword planner, but then the estimated first page, top page and top position bids will often be much lower-particularly on weekends or "off-times"-which, of course, makes sense. However, if I bid so low (perhaps even USD 5) as was recommended to me early on a Saturday morning, Google apparently is refusing to show it at all unless I bid much, much higher (in my experience, probably at least USD 15). Why all the discrepancies? Of course, if you talk to Google Adwords' customer service, they will say that there are no guarantees that you will get to the top position. Also, they will always claim that you are probably having to pay higher because your quality scores aren't good enough. I just wish I knew exactly what it would take to get to the first page, top of page and first position. Is there someplace in the Google Adwords' data where this is stated? Also, in you guys' opinion, is it good enough to get to the top page or do you really need to get to the top of page or top position? I've noticed that it seems that the first page and top of page bids tend to be rather reasonble, but first position is often dramatically more expensive. What is "high enough" to get some good results?

 

Do you have any other good suggestions about cutting costs? I thought I would, for example, cut costs by being more specific. For example:

 

[Translation Agency German English]

 

but it seemed like the "effective bid" was still quite high. Also, the number of estimated clicks from the Keyword Planner goes down dramatically.

 

Thanks.

 

 

 

2 Expert replyverified_user

Why are the bidding recommendations so inconsistent?

Participant ✭ ✭ ✭
# 2
Participant ✭ ✭ ✭

Google AdWords is not a nice, neat, linear system where a person new to it can just plug into a simulator, set a bid, and just crank away.  There is no "easy".  If it were, there would not be a good sized worldwide business of agencies managing campaigns.  Google ads are sold in real-time auction markets distributed all over the world, and vary by geographic region, several campaign parameters, competitive factors, seasonality, etc. 

 

Your best best is to choose your keywords, setup a campaign, then rely upon the three columns of bid estimate data to set your bids.  

 

on the "Keywords" tab in AdWords, use the "Columns>Modify Columns" button choice to add these three columns:
 
Est. first position bid

Est. top page bid

Est. first position bid

 

The numbers in these columns tell you, for each keyword (taking into account your Quality Score) how high you must bid to get onto the first page of Google search results, appear near the top, or appear in the first position. These are average numbers, your position may vary each time there is a search (auction).  You should bid at least as high as "Est. first page bid". 
 
hth!

Why are the bidding recommendations so inconsistent?

Rising Star
# 3
Rising Star

The Keyword Planner is very general, and is to be used as a rough guide only.

 

Once you are actually bidding in the keyword, Google takes your ad copy, website, CTR and other factors into consideration, and therefore the bid estimates will be different to the Keyword Planner.

 

Keep in mind that the suggested bids are for ads to show for 100% of all search queries that match, for all times your ads are set to to run. That is why the minimum is often higher for modified broads than exact match. 

 

Often you can run with less than the suggested bid just fine - especially for modified broad keywords. Use the suggested bid for the exact match version as a guide.

 

 

 

Why are the bidding recommendations so inconsistent?

Follower ✭ ☆ ☆
# 4
Follower ✭ ☆ ☆

Well, I have that set up to show, but it actually seems like the Keyword Planner suggestion is much more accurate than the estimated first page, estimated top of page and estimated first position bids.

 

As I said, if it is an "off-hour" or the weekend, it might even say that I can get top position for the highly-sought-after German keyword for [translation agency] if I bid USD 5, but if I use that bid, I may not get any clicks or impressions all day long-even on a Saturday where it seems like the keyword bid suggestion for this word of USD 23 seems to be closer to "the truth". That is to say, if I bid 23, I will get impressions and will get clicks (and, of course, run up quite high charges for each click).

Why are the bidding recommendations so inconsistent?

Participant ✭ ✭ ✭
# 5
Participant ✭ ✭ ✭

"it actually seems like the Keyword Planner suggestion is much more accurate than..."

 

No, as Rob said that is incorrect.  The keyword planner is only intended as a coarse pre-planning tool. I'd refer you back to his post.

Why are the bidding recommendations so inconsistent?

Follower ✭ ☆ ☆
# 6
Follower ✭ ☆ ☆

Well, I read what he wrote. But I have tried to use exactly the estimated first page, estimated top of page and estimated first position rates and oftentimes I don't even get impressions. If it says USD 5 will get me first position and I use it, I probably won't even get any impressions whereas if I bid substantially higher, I will probably at least get some. I suppose if it's a Saturday or early morning on a weekday, there simply may be very few people searching???

Why are the bidding recommendations so inconsistent?

[ Edited ]
Participant ✭ ✭ ✭
# 7
Participant ✭ ✭ ✭

If you are bidding well above the first position bid and not getting any impressions, then likely you are bidding on a long tail keyword which has little or no search volume in your targeted geography. 

 

Here's another thing to try:  on your campaign management page, select the "Keywords" tab; then use Details > Keyword diagnosis.  See what Google tells you in that report.  The messages are not always accurate; but it also might provide valuable insights.

Why are the bidding recommendations so inconsistent?

Rising Star
# 8
Rising Star

If there is a mantra in this business it is test, test, test.

 

Run your bids for a week at $5 and see what happens. Look to see if you get more impressions at nights or weekends (there could be less competition then because your competitors know that ads convert better during business hours).

 

If you need more clicks/impressions, bid higher for a week, and see what happens. 

 

Predictive tools will never provide more accurate data than actually running live ads. 

How to "make peace" with a high-performing, but expensive and highly-competitive keyword?

Follower ✭ ☆ ☆
# 9
Follower ✭ ☆ ☆

I am a German>English translator. I translate many CVs as well as contracts, web sites, etc. (Most of my ads are in German with German keywords and targeted to Germany, Switzerland and Austria, but I'm writing in English to hopefully reach the most people.) 

 

Based upon lots of use of the keyword planner, by far the most popular keyword for my industry is:

 

[translation agency]   in German: übersetzungsbüro

 

[übersetzungsbüro] gets an estimated 4400 hits per month in Germany, Switzerland and Austria-almost as many as all other relevant keywords combined (translation service, translation company, etc.)

 

So it seems like one has to use it somehow or is missing out on lots of searches. However, as it is presumably quite effective, it's also predictably quite expensive-apparently even "stratopherically" expensive during the work day in Germany, Switzerland and Austria. I have tried everything to make this word work. I've tried to make it more precise to get more relevant clicks and/or better prices:

 

for example:

 

[translation agency german english]

 

or

 

[translation agency prices]

 

or tried to use modified broad instead of exact match (phrase match didn't seem to work so well as people were searching with their local cities and I couldn't put in the name of every one of the 10,000 tiny villages in Germany as a negative keyword!).

 

I've even tried to bid at "off-times" for better results. Unfortunately, if it's the end of the work day in Germany, the "party" seems to be over and everybody has gone home (not a lot of results). The same with early in the morning on a weekday or on the weekends. Not a lot of searches.

 

I've even tried to bid on other terms with less searches like:

 

[translation service]

 

etc. hoping that there would be less competition, lower prices and thus better overall results. But it seems like if you ignore this one keyword, it's hard to get anywhere.

 

About the only success I have had is with modified broad 

 

e.g. +CV +translation +german +english

 

or

 

+CV +translation

 

etc. The prices are generally lower and the type of translation service being offered is quite specific which can be beneficial. However, the number of impressions, clicks and jobs is so low that I get a "drop in the bucket" of results, not a "torrential downpour" of results.

 

Any creative suggestions? Thanks.

How to "make peace" with a high-performing, but expensive and highly-competitive keyword?

[ Edited ]
Top Contributor
# 10
Top Contributor

@Rls1020;

Please refrain from multiple discussions on the same topic. This could be confusing, and we might find ourselves replying to questions already replied. Please   Ask any follow up question  within the initial discussion.

I merged this discussion with  your initial query on the topic;

Thank you;

 

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
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