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Which ad position can give maximum clicks in a fixed budget?

Follower ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Follower ✭ ✭ ✭

I can vie for the no-1 ad position to get maximum clicks. But the no-1 position cost too much.

 

So in experience which ad position( or multiple positions) can provide value for money?

1 Expert replyverified_user
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Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by MosheTLV (Top Contributor)
September 2015

Re: Which ad position can give maximum clicks in a fixed budget?

Badged Google Partner
# 2
Badged Google Partner

The "old school" wisdom, is that generally speaking, an average position of 2 - 2.2, pencils out in the analysis to be the best value for the money. Of course, every situation is different...

 

What are you measuring as fr as performance/value? Clicks, conversions? Know what your goal is, and whatever position provides the best goal value is the best value for your situation. 

 

So, everything depends, but the 2-ish posistion, generally speaking, is till a "better value" than the below 3-ish positions. As you already know, that #1 pos. ain't always a winner. Smiley Happy Makes you wonder whether or not the competitors EVER consider the actual ROAS of their advertising...

Tom

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Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by MosheTLV (Top Contributor)
September 2015

Re: Which ad position can give maximum clicks in a fixed budget?

Badged Google Partner
# 6
Badged Google Partner

Top or side, is a thing of the past. You don't know what the SERP page format actually looks like unless you regularly preview your ads. Even then, who knows... Things are always changing.

The #1 pos. could be on the top of the page, it could be on the side, or ot could be at the bottom of the page. No matter how the page is laid out, a position of 1, is the "first" ad, as you scroll from the top (address bar) of the page down. Avg. pos. is not where the ad is on the page, it's where the ad "ranks" in comparison to other ads, wherever ads are shown on the page.

 

The thinking behind the #2 pos. theory, is that you are still close to the "top" position, but you don't have to pay the top costs. Remember, this is average position though, so it's not so cut and dry. Sometimes you could be #1, sometimes #10, and average a 2 position. Maybe the 10 pos. is where you get all your clicks, but the average position lies, and looks like it's the #2 pos. that's the best.

 

The key to knowing which position is the best value, is knowing what your advertising goal is, and focusing all of your decisions on trying to accomplish more of those goals. If clicks are the goal, try segmenting your campaigns, adgroups, kw's, ads by top vs. other, and see where you get the most clicks, for the best value.

 

 

Tom

View solution in original post

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by MosheTLV (Top Contributor)
September 2015

Re: Which ad position can give maximum clicks in a fixed budget?

Badged Google Partner
# 2
Badged Google Partner

The "old school" wisdom, is that generally speaking, an average position of 2 - 2.2, pencils out in the analysis to be the best value for the money. Of course, every situation is different...

 

What are you measuring as fr as performance/value? Clicks, conversions? Know what your goal is, and whatever position provides the best goal value is the best value for your situation. 

 

So, everything depends, but the 2-ish posistion, generally speaking, is till a "better value" than the below 3-ish positions. As you already know, that #1 pos. ain't always a winner. Smiley Happy Makes you wonder whether or not the competitors EVER consider the actual ROAS of their advertising...

Tom

Re: Which ad position can give maximum clicks in a fixed budget?

Follower ✭ ✭ ✭
# 3
Follower ✭ ✭ ✭

No-2 ad position is which one? Side ad or the top one?

 

What'll be the bid difference between the no-1 or no-2 ad positions? I mean we can control using automated rules so that our bid is just less than the top ad position bid.

Re: Ad position numbering

Top Contributor
# 4
Top Contributor

utilitiesindia;

 

Here you are: position numbering ;

http://support.google.com/adwords/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=1722122


utilitiesindia wrote:

No-2 ad position is which one? Side ad or the top one?

 

What'll be the bid difference between the no-1 or no-2 ad positions? I mean we can control using automated rules so that our bid is just less than the top ad position bid.



Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
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Re: Ad position numbering

Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆
# 5
Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆

I mean we can control using automated rules so that our bid is just less than the top ad position bid.

 

Yes you can (more or less)

 

raise bid by 10 % if lower than 3

lower bid by  5% if better than 2

(unfortunately you can't use integers)

 

( and you could repeat this sometime during the day, using different % (e.g. 5% and 2%)

 

Mind you, you will also be shown on nr 1 and 3 positions during the day, but this is as close as you can get (to my knowledge)

 

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by MosheTLV (Top Contributor)
September 2015

Re: Which ad position can give maximum clicks in a fixed budget?

Badged Google Partner
# 6
Badged Google Partner

Top or side, is a thing of the past. You don't know what the SERP page format actually looks like unless you regularly preview your ads. Even then, who knows... Things are always changing.

The #1 pos. could be on the top of the page, it could be on the side, or ot could be at the bottom of the page. No matter how the page is laid out, a position of 1, is the "first" ad, as you scroll from the top (address bar) of the page down. Avg. pos. is not where the ad is on the page, it's where the ad "ranks" in comparison to other ads, wherever ads are shown on the page.

 

The thinking behind the #2 pos. theory, is that you are still close to the "top" position, but you don't have to pay the top costs. Remember, this is average position though, so it's not so cut and dry. Sometimes you could be #1, sometimes #10, and average a 2 position. Maybe the 10 pos. is where you get all your clicks, but the average position lies, and looks like it's the #2 pos. that's the best.

 

The key to knowing which position is the best value, is knowing what your advertising goal is, and focusing all of your decisions on trying to accomplish more of those goals. If clicks are the goal, try segmenting your campaigns, adgroups, kw's, ads by top vs. other, and see where you get the most clicks, for the best value.

 

 

Tom

Re: Which ad position can give maximum clicks in a fixed budget?

Follower ✭ ✭ ✭
# 7
Follower ✭ ✭ ✭

tomhalejr what is the bid difference between 1st ad and 2nd ad position in percentage?

 

I'd like to know the bid increment steps between each ad position.

Re: Which ad position can give maximum clicks in a fixed budget?

[ Edited ]
Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆
# 8
Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆

Depends on what your competitors are bidding (and their QS) and is different per keyword.

If you use the up and downgrade methode  as I mentiond before you wil eventually get the desired (average) position.

Re: Which ad position can give maximum clicks in a fixed budget?

Badged Google Partner
# 9
Badged Google Partner

It all depends, as Moshe and Marketsharer point out. But, generally speaking, #2 can/may be cheaper than  #3 Pos. for the amount of profitable clicks generated, due to the ad auction system. The #1 pos. tends to be the most competitive (costly), in general. Maybe, you make more money in the most costly pos., maybe you lose money in that position. Unfortunately, it all depends. Smiley Happy

 

I looked at a few accounts, and there are so many qualifications to the avg. Pos. data, that I (I'm sure we all) would feel dishonest to make any specific assumptions, about any other account, based on another accounts avg. pos. In my experience, if a competitor for example, is bound and determined to out bid you for pos. for all/most of your overlapping competitive terms, they are probably not as smart as they think they are. Smiley Happy Generally speaking, don't get into bidding wars, and don't follow best practices if they don't "work" for you. 

 

Outside of our opinions, and personal experience, there's not a lot of honest advice or help we can offer in this forum. The best advice, I think all of us regular contributors can agree on, is to always keep your advertising goal in mind, with all the decisions you make. Smiley Happy

 

 

 

 

Tom