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When do I "" [] and + ?

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# 1
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Typically I start my keywords with a reaonsable list of broad match terms. Sorth through ideas for negatives and let simmer. At what point do I want to start adding Phrase, Exact and Modified Broad? 

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Re: When do I "" [] and + ?

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# 2
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Hi oneano,

You'll probably find varying perspectives on this. Some answers will be based on your overall goals etc. I personally start campaigns using multiple match types per keyword to determine my best performing options. This is not a good long term strategy though. Short answer, use variations in match types immediately and narrow down to the best performers.

-Tom
Tommy Sands, AdWords Top Contributor | Community Profile | Twitter | Philly Marketing Labs
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Re: When do I "" [] and + ?

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# 3
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I love the complexity of AdWords, there is not just one way to do it. . . to make a odd reference it is like playing a game of Starcraft, there are many ways to acheive the same goals using the ruleset of the game. 

 

I typically start a campaign off with a few hundred keywords, Im guessing that the best bet is to gather data to see what the top performing keywords are and then begin split testing "" + [] 

 

 

Re: When do I "" [] and + ?

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# 4
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I like to go more targeted.

 

A list of relevant keywords, in exact and phrase. Plus some broad match modified, to catch any variation which meets a precondition (having a certain trigger keyword in it which clearly denotes the fact that it is clearly related to that product / page).

 

Phrase and exact take care of relevant search terms, broad match modified gather some more keywords which I haven't previously thought of.

 

If, after a short while, I see that I'm knee deep in "Low search volume", I know it's time to use a bigger net Smiley Happy.

 

I also like to mine Google Analytics and Webmaster tools historical data and gather relevant keywords. Google Analytics gives me keywords people have already reached me through them, and I can also judge the engagement of those visitors. That is, of course, when there is historical data.

Calin Sandici, AdWords Top Contributor | Find me on: Google+ | Twitter | LinkedIn | myBlog
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Re: When do I "" [] and + ?

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# 5
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I fall somewhere between everyone else Smiley Happy

 

I like to use the new modified broad types in new campaigns as, for me, they're the ideal start that's more targeted than plain broad but not as restrictive as phrase or exact.  Of course it does depend on the product/service being advertised.  There are often obvious phrase/exact matches you can throw in from day one (even if perhaps on day 20 you throw them out again).

 

In short, I don't think there's any rule, but I do like the +.

 

I would perhaps also say that "start(ing) off with a few hundred keywords" seems like an awful lot to me.  I'm a big fan of short lists, tight focus, and for many campaigns with limited budgets there's rarely any sense in having a 1000 keywords when 5 of them account for 95% of all clicks/conversions.  In new campaigns/groups, I usually start with about 10 or 15 keywords and work from there.

 

Again, there will be campaigns where you know from day one that you'll need a long keyword list, but for me they're rare.

 

Jon

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Re: When do I "" [] and + ?

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# 6
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Hey oneano - how you doing?

 

For me I actually start out with the more restrictive match types Phrase and Exact and then loosen things up with broad or broad match modified.  I am noticing for myself at least that Broad Match Modified is letting in lots and lots of irrelevant traffic lately.  It seemed to be more restrictive when first rolled out but getting looser over the months - maybe I am crazy but I am falling out of love with Broad Match Modified Smiley Wink

 

This approach allows me to get off to a really good start with CTR.  Also since it takes time to collect enough data to give you a strong search query report this way you are not potentially doing poorly before you even know it. i.e. you dont have to wait a week or two to get your search query report and see that you have been showing up on irrelevant search terms.



Kim Clink, AdWords Top Contributor | Community Profile | Twitter | Philly Marketing Labs
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Re: When do I "" [] and + ?

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# 7
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Well, one thing we all seem to agree on is that we wouldn't usually start with "simple" broad matches.

 

For me, the only time I'd use a simple broad match is if the keyword is so specific it can't possibly be mistaken for anything else and that usually means a model number, or very specific name (and bear in mind even model names often have other meanings - look at the difference between a Ford "Focus" and a Ford "Mondeo").  Even relatively specific terms can be the source of widely different search intentions, so even with something like a printer or TV model number, unless the company operates with that model in all possible ways (sales, servicing, parts, etc.) you'll probably need to tighten the focus (sorry) to make the triggers more relevant.

 

Location targeting can help with this focusing.  For example, the broad match of taxi might be OK if combined with a very restrictive location target.  Interestingly, clearly a lot of companies don't appreciate this; I've just searched for "taxi" and seen 5 ads for London taxi firms.  Not a lot of good to me here in the Yorkshire Dales, 250 miles away.

 

Jon

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