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When Keywords are Part Numbers - Match Type Advice

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Hello all,

 

I'm launching a campaign for my company that distributes electronic components (7 million of them). My budget is going to be small for the first month, sort of like a testing phase.  My gut says I should use exact match since every keyword is a specific part number. I will probably lose out on some traffic but my CPAs and costs will most likely be lower.  There is a good search volume for people entering specific part numbers into Google.

 

I will start out with 10,000 - 15,000 keywords/part numbers first due to my small daily budget.  Each part number will take the user to a specific landing page.  Should I start out with exact match first or use both exact match and phrase match?  If I did the latter, what should the bidding strategy be? Maybe bid phrase match 30% lower than exact? Unfortunately, there is not a whole lot of information out there on part numbers.  The Google traffic estimator doesn't work for them so I'm going to have to do some trial and error.  

 

Any advice would be greatly appreciated.  

 

2 Expert replyverified_user

Re: When Keywords are Part Numbers - Match Type Advice

Collaborator ✭ ✭ ✭
# 2
Collaborator ✭ ✭ ✭

Hello Vikrant !

 

1) Use the keyword planner to search for exact match traffic for your keywords. 

 

2) Try to create multiple campaigns targeting different locations for optimisation, for example if your best sales are in region 1, you can bid higher on that region.

 

3) To find out how much traffic the phrase match can bring you vs. the exact match, you can use the "Review estimates" button in the keyword planner. It is somewhat of a hidden option. The default interface only shows estimates for the exact match even if you type the phrase or bmm matches. You can write about some part numbers and the location you are targeting and I can post some print-screens on how to make this research in the keyword planner.

 

4) " Should I start out with exact match first or use both exact match and phrase match?  " . I'd say start with the exact match and perhaps use exact match keywords including part number and words like "price" in a "price search" ad group.

 

5) Make use of sitelink extensions. If a part belongs to a category, include many sitelinks to other expensive parts in that category. You will occupy more advertising space and direct users to more useful products at the same time.

 

6) "I will start out with 10,000 - 15,000 keywords/part numbers first due to my small daily budget. " , if every keyword receives 2 clicks for 0.5 $ per click, perhaps you should consider a daily budget of over 10.000 $ per day for adwords ? For this amount google should give you at least a  dedicated account manager ? Try to ask for this option, give them a call using this phone no :

 

https://support.google.com/adwords/answer/8206?hl=en&hlrm=en

 

7) " If I did the latter, what should the bidding strategy be? Maybe bid phrase match 30% lower than exact? "

 

The QS of all the match types for a keyword is the same so simply bidding for a phrase match even 1 cent lower, makes it have a lower ad rank, and lose the competition against the exact match . There are also exceptions listed here :

 

https://support.google.com/adwords/answer/2756257?hl=en

Re: When Keywords are Part Numbers - Match Type Advice

Top Contributor
# 3
Top Contributor

Hi Vikrant, if the part numbers are sufficiently complex, there's really no reason why you shouldn't just use Simple Broad Matches.  The Simple Broad Match type is inappropriate for most actual words because it's far too broad but if we're talking about part numbers that are a decent length - say at least 6 characters - and are a mixture of numbers and letters, there will be very few matches that aren't relevant to your business and you'll avoid the need for very complex Keyword analysis.  

 

Please note what Adrian has said about your budget because I know I've covered this with you before in your earlier posts.  If you're looking at 15,000 Keywords then you will need a very substantial daily budget to see any kind of realistic performance and there is certainly no point in doing any kind of "test" with a budget less than 5 figures per day - as Adrian has suggested - in my opinion.

 

You've said you're going to start with a small daily budget as a test.  I'd say this is the wrong approach.  You need to test with a budget that allows all your Keywords to have a fair chance at performing to the best of their ability.  This means a large budget for a test, not a small one.  If you use a small budget for a test you won't have any real idea of how your Keywords could perform when they're allowed to match every possible impression.

 

It is much better to test with a large budget then, using the data from that test, you can remove Keywords that appear unlike to perform well and your working budget will be lower.

 

I'll echo Adrian's other comment as well - and again, I know I've said this to you before - if you are truly looking at the sort of size of project you appear to be you should hire a professional to manage it on your behalf.  One single error could cost you thousands of dollars per day and "trial and error" really doesn't sound like a very sensible approach with a substantial budget.

 

Jon

AdWords Top Contributor Google+ Profile | Partner Profile | AdWords Audits

Re: When Keywords are Part Numbers - Match Type Advice

Top Contributor
# 4
Top Contributor
Adrian,

You wrote, "The QS of all the match types for a keyword is the same so simply bidding for a phrase match even 1 cent lower, makes it have a lower ad rank, and lose the competition against the exact match ."

This is not exactly true. The QS you see in the UI is always based on exact match, but QS is not static. It is calculated each and every time the keyword is eligible. Besides, in most cases, if both phrase and exact match are eligible, you would want the exact match to trigger, not the phrase match. The purpose of phrase match is to pick up queries that include the keyword plus other terms. In most cases, when there is a tie, the more restrictive match type keyword will be triggered.

Pete
petebardo -- Deadhead doing AdWords

Re: When Keywords are Part Numbers - Match Type Advice

Collaborator ✭ ✭ ✭
# 5
Collaborator ✭ ✭ ✭
So he should bid .... how much less for phrase ?

Re: When Keywords are Part Numbers - Match Type Advice

Collaborator ✭ ✭ ✭
# 6
Collaborator ✭ ✭ ✭

I remember now that vikrant talked about the usage of PLA in an eariler post. Just a warning : in a PLA campaign the keyword tab does not influence the PLA bids. It is there just to help you run also text ads without creating another campaign for this purpose. If you plan on using keywords just for listing products just do not make this effort.

Re: When Keywords are Part Numbers - Match Type Advice

Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆
# 7
Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆
Normally, people don't search on part numbers. But there are always exceptions and the electronic component industry is one.

For example, I have a client selling power tools parts. At first, he asked to create keywords based on part numbers. But hardly anybody searches that way in that industry. Instead, they'll search on "air filter for" and the make and model of their tool.

As I'm familiar with electronics, I'll use examples that may be indeed be the case of what you're doing. Don't use only the part number, use the full name such as "2n2222 transistor" or "555 timer", although 2n2222 is long and specific enough to use as a one-word broad match. But do use all three types. In the case of "555", it would be too vague and could trigger for all sorts of things. Definitely don't use one-word keywords like "transistor".

As you are beginning, you are in the discovery phase. Use exact and phrase, even on just the part numbers. Use broad modified carefully and find out how people actually search for parts. Use longer tails for broad modified.

I'm not one to bid differently for different match types. The vast majority of the time, one bid will not make a big difference in position or much else for each match type. Again, you are starting, let the data tell you how you should approach things. But as I said, I rarely set different bids at the keyword level and I don't ever recall basing the decision on the match type.

I advise to carefully structure the account. In your case, likely Semiconductors, Integrated Circuits and the like as campaign names. Create a group naming convention and stick to it. Have a mix of most popular components and lesser ones, maybe 50/50 and see what happens. This could be valuable data to have.

Have some more generic terms like "general purpose transistor" and see if people search that way. Maybe you have such a top-level page or land on the most appropriate component page.

Obviously, managing thousands of parts can be problematic and time consuming, never mind once you get into the millions. What is your plan and long-term strategy? Do you have tools to help? Hiring an account manager may be the way to go.

Hope that helps and good luck.