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Weird Search Queries

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Hello

I've just been doing a search query for a client and keep finding &amp as part of the search query. (These particular search queries are often very long too). What does the &amp mean? Thanks

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions
Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by Eric Gehler (Badged Google Partner)
December 2015

Re: Weird Search Queries

Participant ✭ ✭ ✭
# 2
Participant ✭ ✭ ✭

Hey Leadgenerators, how are things?

 

The term "&amp" is the same as the symbol "&". So if you have something in your report that looks like "Blue &amp Yellow", the user query was "Blue & Yellow".

 

The symbol "&" is often user on HTML markup and specially on URLs, but there's a problem in that: That symbol is known for creating Entities, which are symbols like "©". That symbol can be created by using "&copy" on the HTML, so you can imagine what can happen when we use  "&" on the URLs. If you happen to have a URL like this: myboobs.com?chapter=1&section=2&copy=3&lang=en, the URL will break because "&copy" will be converted to ©.

 

For that, "&" is often converted to "&amp" for things not to break, depending on the program/software/browser/etc being used.

 

Hope this helps.


Leandro Martinez | Basta1Click

View solution in original post

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by Eric Gehler (Badged Google Partner)
December 2015

Re: Weird Search Queries

Participant ✭ ✭ ✭
# 2
Participant ✭ ✭ ✭

Hey Leadgenerators, how are things?

 

The term "&amp" is the same as the symbol "&". So if you have something in your report that looks like "Blue &amp Yellow", the user query was "Blue & Yellow".

 

The symbol "&" is often user on HTML markup and specially on URLs, but there's a problem in that: That symbol is known for creating Entities, which are symbols like "©". That symbol can be created by using "&copy" on the HTML, so you can imagine what can happen when we use  "&" on the URLs. If you happen to have a URL like this: myboobs.com?chapter=1&section=2&copy=3&lang=en, the URL will break because "&copy" will be converted to ©.

 

For that, "&" is often converted to "&amp" for things not to break, depending on the program/software/browser/etc being used.

 

Hope this helps.


Leandro Martinez | Basta1Click