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Using phase match and broad match modifiers in same ad group

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Confused over agroup set up

 

Adgroup set up Example (All in the same adgroup)

 

"Driving Instructor Warrington"

[Driving Instructor Warrington]

+Driving +Instructors +Warrington

 

I know +Driving +Instructors +Warrington will cover all the above but would having each as a seperate keyword like above improve there quality score if they're doing good rather than being covered under the board match modifier?

 

Is this correct below or could the Board Match Modifier keyword get the credit for all

Someone typing in Driving Instructor Warrington would go under keyword [Driving Instructor Warrington]

Someone typing in Driving Instructor in Warrington would go under keyword +Driving +Instructors +Warrington

Someone typing in Cheap Driving Instructor Warrington would go under keyword "Driving Instructor Warrington"

 

Will the above conflict or compete against each other in the same ad group?

 

An adwords guy told me that if set up like above "Warrington Instructor Driving" it wouldn't show as "Driving Instructor Warrington" would stop it but I didn't know if that was right as I thought +Driving +Instructors +Warrington would make it show, but he said they'd conflict?

 

Close keyword variations

Do I have to use keyword instructor and instrustors or will google always show both if I just say instructor?

1 Expert replyverified_user
1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

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Marked as Best Answer.
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Accepted by topic author Joey2012
September 2015

Re: Using phase match and broad match modifiers in same ad group

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Hi @Joey2012 first off, don't worry about "conflict".  Keywords in an Account never "conflict" with each other because Google has sophisticated algorithms to work out which one should be given the match; there's no fighting and no damage possible by having multiple Keywords that can match a search query, and it's very common for this to be the case within Campaigns.  So don't worry about "conflicts".

 

In terms of what will match what, I think you've got it right.  [Exact] and "Phrase" matches are word order sensitive so if the order of the words in the Keyword is A, B, C, they'll need to be A, B, C in the search query for the match to happen.  Modified Broad Matches don't care about word order so +A +B +C can match to a search query for C B A (or whatever).

 

The typical use of multiple matches within an Ad Group is the process of optimisation and discovery.  With a new Campaign you'd tend to use broader matches to attract more data and gather information on the sort of search queries that attract useful clicks.  Once you see significant data for a particular search query you might then add that term as a Keyword in its own right.  Since this Keyword will now match the search query exactly, it's likely to have a higher Quality Score and you can adjust its bids individually to get the best performance.  So, typically (but not always), you might find an Ad Group starts out with all Modified Broad Matches, then over time you'd add a number of Phrase and Exact matches.  If you find a lot, you may break those tighter matches out into their own Ad Group so you can make the Ads very specific.  You may even, after quite some time, find you no longer need the broader match and can pause it.

 

Does this help?

 

Jon

AdWords Top Contributor Google+ Profile | Partner Profile | AdWords Audits

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Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author Joey2012
September 2015

Re: Using phase match and broad match modifiers in same ad group

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Hi @Joey2012 first off, don't worry about "conflict".  Keywords in an Account never "conflict" with each other because Google has sophisticated algorithms to work out which one should be given the match; there's no fighting and no damage possible by having multiple Keywords that can match a search query, and it's very common for this to be the case within Campaigns.  So don't worry about "conflicts".

 

In terms of what will match what, I think you've got it right.  [Exact] and "Phrase" matches are word order sensitive so if the order of the words in the Keyword is A, B, C, they'll need to be A, B, C in the search query for the match to happen.  Modified Broad Matches don't care about word order so +A +B +C can match to a search query for C B A (or whatever).

 

The typical use of multiple matches within an Ad Group is the process of optimisation and discovery.  With a new Campaign you'd tend to use broader matches to attract more data and gather information on the sort of search queries that attract useful clicks.  Once you see significant data for a particular search query you might then add that term as a Keyword in its own right.  Since this Keyword will now match the search query exactly, it's likely to have a higher Quality Score and you can adjust its bids individually to get the best performance.  So, typically (but not always), you might find an Ad Group starts out with all Modified Broad Matches, then over time you'd add a number of Phrase and Exact matches.  If you find a lot, you may break those tighter matches out into their own Ad Group so you can make the Ads very specific.  You may even, after quite some time, find you no longer need the broader match and can pause it.

 

Does this help?

 

Jon

AdWords Top Contributor Google+ Profile | Partner Profile | AdWords Audits

Re: Using phase match and broad match modifiers in same ad group

[ Edited ]
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 3
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Hi Jon

 

Do I need to do

Driving Instuctor Warrington and

Driving Instructor's' Warrington

Or should the first keyword show up for every instance

Re: Using phase match and broad match modifiers in same ad group

Top Contributor
# 4
Top Contributor

Hi @Joey2012, all match types automatically include plurals and simple variations so there's no need to have both.

 

Jon

AdWords Top Contributor Google+ Profile | Partner Profile | AdWords Audits