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Using Phonetics to confuse Searches

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

I have been using Adwords for 7+ months successfully for people looking for "Homes for Sale in Summerset" to target home buyers in Summerset CA.  Recently Google has started using phonetics to find similar sounding words and is presenting users search hits for Somerset.  Though I have tried using Negative Keyword and Excluded Locations - users are being shown homes for sale in Somerset South Dakota, Somerset KY, Somerset TN, and even Somerset CA. Yes, my ad is appearing, but all the rest of the ads on the page are not what the user is looking for so the user is getting confused, thinking my ad has been erronously placed when in fact my ad is a 1:1 hit and google has made the search error.  How can I get the attention of google to let them know they are giving unimportant information to their searches and reducing the effectiveness of their search engine?

1 Expert replyverified_user

Using Phonetics to confuse Searches

Badged Google Partner
# 2
Badged Google Partner

Try - Advanced targeting: Only users in my targeted location.

Tom

Re: Using Phonetics to confuse Searches

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 3
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
Already using advanced targeting and it does not prevent the ads from the
other regions appearing. There are at least 10 other Realtors in the
Summerset (community) Brentwood CA area, yet when you type in, "homes for
sale Summerset", my ad appears then all the rest are from South Dakota,
Tennessee or Kentucky. You would expect the other local Realtors would
appear over ads from 1500 to 2000 miles away.

It seems to me that Google has placed a phonetic preference in their search
to help support Google Assistant and not realized that it then negates the
negative or targeted keywords to help refine the search.

Left unchanged, searchers will start to get worse results and begin to
find other search engines that are more accurate.

Bob Lowry

M 925 709 4801
E BobLowry@gmail.com

This email should be treated Confidential and Proprietary and not forwarded
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Using Phonetics to confuse Searches

Badged Google Partner
# 4
Badged Google Partner

It sounds like your competitors don't have a clue what they are doing. Are you getting traffic from outside of your targeted market, or are you seeing ads for realtors outside of your market?

Tom

Using Phonetics to confuse Searches

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 5
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Tom, that then eliminates people outside my area who are looking in my area, a requirement in the real estate market to capture leads relocating into my market.

Using Phonetics to confuse Searches

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 6
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Tom, my competitors are the largest real estate lead generators using Google AdWords. They know what their doing and with Google using Phonetics they are messing up the search result accuracy. This is a Google issue, not an adwords user issue. Google needs to fix it.

Using Phonetics to confuse Searches

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 7
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Tom,

I am getting leads from outside my area and from inside my physical area since I selected the targeting of people in, and people looking for or having interest in my target area.  I have also created negative keywords for the areas outside with similar names in different states and even their zip codes.  That all worked fine until about 6 weeks ago when I noticed my leads dropping and all Summerset searches were returning listings from Somerset, all from Zillow, Trulia, Realtor.com advertisers. So the big paid advertisers, who understand key words have not isolated Summerset from their results and due to the phonetics of Summerset and Somerset sounding the same, Google appears not to understand the difference and is showing preference to the large advertisers for the wrong results in my area.  Hope someone in Google gets this message and corrects the algorithym before other advertisers realize the error and more importantly before other searchers realize the results are Fake Results and then look for another search engine, like FB, Bing, etc.

Using Phonetics to confuse Searches

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 8
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

This message has been sitting here with no replies for 2 weeks.  In the meantime I have seen my adwords charges double and my leads cut in half due to the changes that google made in adwords using phonetics.  If any others see the same, let's begin to share so maybe we can generate some awareness within google to correct their issue with regards to using phonetics to search instead of search phrases.

Using Phonetics to confuse Searches

Top Contributor
# 9
Top Contributor

ads and organic-search are

entirely separate systems.

 

for issues related to google-organic-search --

https://productforums.google.com/forum/#!categories/webmasters/crawling-indexing--ranking

 

[=?utf-8?Q?=F0=9F=8F=A0?=] Re: Using Phonetics to confuse Searches

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 10
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
I am very familiar with the difference between ads and organic search. My
reference is toward adwords, where users type in the phrase, "homes for
sale in Summerset" and google uses phonetics to return the results for
"homes for sale in Somerset". As you can see they are different and as an
advertiser seeking hits in Summerset you can see why I am concerned.

The same result would be if a person was entering the phrase and getting an
organic ad where phonetics were being used.

This confuses the user, ruins the search result and deflects leads from
finding my ads because google has re-directed them to another location all
together.

--
Bob Lowry - Owner
BRE # 01958003

*On Demand Realty*BRE# 01958723

M: 925 709 4801
T: 510 972 4801
O: 925 464 1006 x700
F: 866-674-1290
E: Bob@OnDemandRealty.net

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