AdWords
5K members online now
5K members online now
Improve your AdWords performance and boost your ROI, CTR, and Quality Score
Guide Me
star_border
Reply

Usage of Modifier on broad search terms

Follower ✭ ☆ ☆
# 1
Follower ✭ ☆ ☆

Hello I have an query regarding how modifer works . 

 

Recently I have setup a campaign with  keywords :

1)              +shoes +at  London ,

2)               +shoes +nearby +london

3)                +shoes in +London

 

I found in months report that all the keywords got impression and clicks.

 

But one of my collegue says that  "if a modifer is to be used it should be mentioned at all words on a keyword" and he says that the 2nd one only is the correct format.

 

Does my collegue wordings are correct ? , If so then how I could have clicks and impressions for the wrong mentions of 1 and 3 ?

 

thanks in advance for your replies.

 

 

 

 

 

1 Expert replyverified_user
1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions
Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author Billy T
September 2015

Re: Usage of Modifier on broad search terms

Participant ✭ ✭ ✭
# 2
Participant ✭ ✭ ✭
Hi Billy T

No That is not necessary to put modifier on all the words.The words that are preceded by a modifier (+) sign must appear in the user’s keyword phrase exactly or as a close variation.

Thanks

View solution in original post

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author Billy T
September 2015

Re: Usage of Modifier on broad search terms

Participant ✭ ✭ ✭
# 2
Participant ✭ ✭ ✭
Hi Billy T

No That is not necessary to put modifier on all the words.The words that are preceded by a modifier (+) sign must appear in the user’s keyword phrase exactly or as a close variation.

Thanks

Re: Usage of Modifier on broad search terms

Top Contributor
# 3
Top Contributor
Hi Billy,

While Santosh is correct, I would agree with your colleague, if you're going to be using BMM, you're looking for more control over how you're keywords are matching search terms.

By designating terms with the + sign, you're requiring them to be part of the search query. In your example +shoes + london would cover all three examples. I would then use more restrictive match types on longer tail keywords that you can mine from your SQR.

My couple cents Smiley Happy

-Tommy
Tommy Sands, AdWords Top Contributor | Community Profile | Twitter | Philly Marketing Labs
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer.’