AdWords
2.3K members online now
2.3K members online now
Improve your AdWords performance and boost your ROI, CTR, and Quality Score
Guide Me
star_border
Reply

Top AdWords tip to improve sales suggested by Community members

[ Edited ]
Zee Community Manager
Community Manager
# 1
Zee Community Manager
Community Manager

Hi Community!

 

 

I'd like to ask you this week a simple question: What is your top AdWords tip to improve online and/or offline sales? We'd like each one of you to share one so we can get a chance to others to share their tips with us. Don't be shy if the tip was already mentioned, we want to hear from all of you.

 

So let me go first. I believe that the most important step to improve online sales for any user (whether the person is using AdWords or not) is a website. Mainly, how easy it is to navigate and find things on your site and how fast it loads. Personally, I think I can't beat Jon's article on the importance of your site. Yes, Jon you are the master of words! For all of you who are interested in learning more, read his article.

 

Now it's your turn! What is your tip to improve sales and why?

Zee
G+
2 Expert replyverified_user

Re: Share with us: What is your top AdWords tip to improve sales?

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

I feel like I've just been introduced by an MC, thank you Zee and I hope you don't mind if I make the first reply here (I promise to keep it short!).

 

My tip would be:  Advertise what you sell.  Pretty silly and obvious, huh?  But many advertisers don't do this; sure they advertise the sort of things they sell, but they are nowhere near focused enough to get great sales.  Let's say you run an online electrical goods store, just like the one in my article.  What I see a lot of people doing is selling "Electrical Goods" in their Ads.  Be more precise, sell TVs, Blu-Ray Players, Hi-Fis and Ipod docks as separate tasks.  You can go further; advertise LED TVs, Plasma TVs, 3D TVs.  And further; 40" LED TVs, 46" LED TVs - you see where I'm going here.

 

The more tightly focused your advertising is, the easier it is to attract people who are looking for exactly that product.  Once you've found that person, making a sale is just down to the usual stuff, price, your website and so on.

 

You'll need to think carefully about your Adwords structure and you'll need to monitor results at various "levels" (for example, it may be that the Group for TV sizes is too tightly focused and you get more conversions by just advertising at the next level up).

 

That's it!

 

Jon

AdWords Top Contributor Google+ Profile | Partner Profile | AdWords Audits

Two Ways to Advertise

[ Edited ]
Follower ✭ ✭ ☆
# 3
Follower ✭ ✭ ☆

This is just my humble opinion.

 

From Marketing 101 we all learned that there are basically two ways to promote your products and services, differentiation and price.   When most online retailers are selling a lot of the same products, most resort to price.

 

The most difficult problem to deal with in the retail industry today is MAP (minimum advertised price) pricing.  Most of the manufacturers, from Sony to BMW, all have a MAP policy.  Most of the consumer electronic manufacturers are trying to 'cleanse' the industry of internet-only retailers by really stepping up the enforcement of their MAP policies.  There have been very large retailers in the past six months cut off by manufacturers for breaking MAP policy. 

 

So, how do we (retailers and advertisers) deal with MAP while using the 'advertise by price' model?  

 

1.  We can report MAP violators and hope the manufacturers will do something about the violation. I have written a number of programs that price shop all of our competitors and produce reports of MAP violations.   But unfortunately this is like playing wack-a-mole.

 

2.  We can come up with clever ways of gettting around MAP.  

 

a) Add to Cart to see price seems to be a way most retailers are dealing with this, but I have seen in new MAP policies from vendors that this is no longer allowed.   

 

b) My personal favorite right now is "instant" quote.  There are a number of retailers doing this. Basically you click on a link on the product page and fill in your email address and you are instantly sent an email with a link to that product with a lower price.  The link has a life of usually 1 hour.  I have actually seen this done from Google Shopping as well.

 

c) You can always resort to "call for price", but there was a great write up about call for price in user articles.  The big problem with this is people in general DON'T like talking to sales people. And most people don't realize that if you call you can save a lot of money.  (I just ordered a new Alienware Desktop and saved $300.00 by just calling in instead of ordering online.)

 

I have submitted ideas to the people at Google Shopping about implementing a way to display "add to cart to see price" and "call for price".

 

So you are probably asking yourself, "what does this have to do with adwords?".  With the emergence of PLA's you are not getting the chance to differentiate yourself with text anymore. (besides the "promotion" box in which everyone puts free shipping).  Google is trying to do the differentiation for us with Trusted stores, but once everyone is a trusted store, what's the point?

 

So my advice would be: Stay on top of your pricing and your competitors prices. You do not want to buy PLAs for products that your are not even close in pricing.  It is a waste of time and resources.

 

 

 

Re: Two Ways to Advertise

[ Edited ]
Zee Community Manager
Community Manager
# 4
Zee Community Manager
Community Manager

@Cobnut: Jon's best tip is: Be specific in your ad text.

 

 

@ComputerBob: It's a more of a future tip how to stay on top with PLAs. I really enjoyed reading it. The tip in the conclusion was: Stay on top of your pricing and your competitors prices.

 

 

Who's up to take a turn in our tip-sharing post?

Zee
G+

Re: Two Ways to Advertise

[ Edited ]
Explorer ✭ ✭ ✭
# 5
Explorer ✭ ✭ ✭

Jon is absolutely right. I can't tell you how often I see ads or take on clients who advertise the generic term (ie electrical goods) instead of the specific. I can show you lots of stats that show generic campaigns are much less profitable.

 

It's the same for almost any other type of business. A potential client calls and says they are a law firm, how much to create and manage a campaign. Well, what areas of law do you do? If you do only criminal law (which could in itself be a big campaign) it will cost more than if you do only divorce cases.

 

A lot of Adwords advertisers will take the lazy route and do a quick and dirty approach. Many seem they don't want to be bothered with it. But that's a mistake.

 

>> there are basically two ways to promote your products and services, differentiation and price.

 

Differentiation, yes. You must be different somehow and tell your prospects that you are and how. You can't have ads that are the same or nearly so as everybody else's. Once they click, your page must continue in that direction.

 

Price however is not always a factor. If you can show how different you are and convince them that you are the better value, people will often buy the more expensive item. Unfortunately, most people think they have to be the cheapest and that is not true. Just show you are the best value. That means you have to sell, not simply say you have the item and here's the price.

 

Re: Two Ways to Advertise

[ Edited ]
Follower ✭ ✭ ☆
# 6
Follower ✭ ✭ ☆

I totally agree, it was much simpler back in the day to show value when there were brick and mortar stores.  Neil Ashe (President of Walmart.com) told me that the age of the retailer is far, far gone.  It is the age of the consumer.   When the consumer has unlimited access to pricing engines like Google Shopping and Bing, it's just a race to the bottom.  

 

It used to be that you did business with a company because of the training that the employees went through. I was with Circuit City Inc. in the early 2000s and Best Buy Inc. in the 1990s.  I watched both of those companies get hit by the realities of the age of the consumer.    The value of those stores was the knowledge that was provided through very expensive training.   Well today that expensive training is only an Internet forum away (weird, sorta like the one were on now)!

 

Even product presentation isn't even a way to differentiate anymore.  I was desktop shopping last week and there are eRetailers out there that have amazing photos and awesome site search comparison engines.  I surely used these tools on their sites and then I went straight to Google Shopping to find the lowest price.  (The worst part is, I am a software engineer that worked on SOLR Enterprise Search, so I know how much time it takes to develop these tools.)

 

As to PLAs being the future, I am pretty sure the future is now.  I think PLAs accounted for almost 30% of all product related search clicks in 2012.  I am seeing PLA ROAS of 17x-20x.  And from the experiments I have seen Google doing with PLAs on SERPS, I would spend as much time as you can figuring out how to best do maintenance on PLA campaigns.

 

 All my experience is in enterprise level ecommerce, so it is not necessarily applicable to law firms, etc.

Re: Two Ways to Advertise

[ Edited ]
Zee Community Manager
Community Manager
# 7
Zee Community Manager
Community Manager

@Lucid_Marketing: Great points. be specific - differentiate - it doesn't always have to cost you a lot. 

 

 

 

@ComputerBob: Very nice post. I hope you were able to buy a good destop. And your tip: PLAs are the future. 

 

Thanks all. I'm really enjoying this discussion. 

Zee
G+

Re: Share with us: What is your top AdWords tip to improve sales?

[ Edited ]
Top Contributor
# 8
Top Contributor

Hi Zee,

 

There could be some overlap between the following post and some previous thoughts shared but I have been picking away at this for a couple days now. Smiley Happy

 

I would like to add on to your "website" suggestion with one simple word: TRUST.

 

Imagine you owned a brick and mortar store for a moment. A customer walks through the door. My guess is that most folks in that position would do everything in their power and ability to ensure that customer was greeted with a smile, treated well and helped to secure what they're in search of. Duplicating the experience online is strongly based on TRUST.

 

Establishing TRUST with customers online should be at the top of every business' list of goals; especially when you add an e-commerce website to the mix. If a customer is comfortable using your site, feels confident purchasing from you and is convinced that you will stand by your products, you're ensuring a positive experience. Chances are good that this customer will TRUST your business, recommend it to others and return in the future.

 

Here are a few suggestions on how you can establish TRUST online. I understand this is not a complete list and some of these suggestions go without saying but I think they're worth a mention:

 

T - Transparent - Disclose as much information as you can and that makes sense for your site. Be open and honest about your business practices, your locations and provide all necessary contact information. Stay away from additional fees, sneaky shipping charges or any other non-disclosed charges or inconveniences; they will always leave a bad impression on customers.

 

 

R - Reliable - Be responsible and keep your site updated and updated often. Run SPELL CHECK, simple things can turn potential customers away before you have an opportunity to make a sale. Customers need to know that your pricing and availability are accurate, proper shipping will occur on time as promised. They also want to know that support is available when needed and is delivered in a kind, caring and helpful manner.

 

 

U - User Friendly - A website should represent your business in a professional manner. This starts with the look and feel and continues through all pieces of the puzzle. Content, Page load speed, navigation and readability are just a few areas of focus. The idea is to make the experience memorable for positive reasons as well as reflecting your personality. Finding the happy medium can be challenging but no one said you only have one chance, make improvements when you can and test test test.

 

 

S - Security - I think it goes without saying that security is a major element in online commerce and needs to be taken very seriously. Many people are still cautious about online transactions. Make certain that you have proper SSL certificates, a secure checkout and protect customer data. Security is really a twofold idea: actual security vs. perceived security. You could have the most secure servers on the planet but if the customer can not verify or cannot visibly determine this, all the effort is for naught.

 

 

T - Testimonials - Put yourself at the mercy of your customers. Share your testimonials, use the powers of the social sphere and make use of ratings. If you do right by your customers, they will want to share their experiences and will do so, let them promote your business as well.

 

 

TRUST is only established when proper measures are taken from the moment of conception for a business. It all starts from day 1. These same measures should be taken and considered when presenting your company online. Leave customers no option but to come back.

 

I'd love to expand upon this so please share any thoughts you may have.

 

-Tom

Tommy Sands, AdWords Top Contributor | Community Profile | Twitter | Philly Marketing Labs
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer.’

Re: Share with us: What is your top AdWords tip to improve sales?

[ Edited ]
Explorer ✭ ✭ ✭
# 9
Explorer ✭ ✭ ✭

Bob, while it's true it's "the age of the consumer" because they can easily get the information they want/need without leaving home and at any time of day, you can still make the sale with higher prices. Again, it's about convincing the prospect that you offer more, thus provide more value. Of course, some will only shop on price. But the age of the consumer can work both ways too: it's for them to get information and your chance to show you provide the best value. And building trust. If everyone shopped only on price, we'd all be driving Ladas.

 

Someone has to tell me what PLA stands for. I'm sure it will be obvious to me when someone mentions it but right now, I'm in the dark. This business is starting to have too many acronyms.

 

Re: Share with us: What is your top AdWords tip to improve sales?

[ Edited ]
Follower ✭ ✭ ☆
# 10
Follower ✭ ✭ ☆

>>If everyone shopped only on price, we'd all be driving Ladas.

 

That's an abductive argument.  Are you saying that when you go luxury car shopping you don't shop for price?  All of the dealerships offer basically the same perks (within the same lines) dictated by the manufacturer. 

 

With that said, do you have a way to differentiate an online retailer through adwords that will improve sales?  A actionable item. 

 

PLA - Product Listing Ad (Google Shopping)