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Still very confused about match types

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# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

I have several questions regarding match types and I will just use examples to make it easier to understand and answer. I'm working on a Google Ads account for a company that specializes in induction heating. 

 

1. If you have two phrase (or BMM) match keywords, which are basically the same other than a slight variation on ONE of the words, should you just keep the keyword with the most general variation of that phrase?

Example: "induction heat services" and "induction heating services" -- Will these two ultimately end up competing against each other and could you just delete "induction heating services"? Will the word "heating" still show up as a variant of "heat"? Same question would apply if I'm using BMM like +induction +heat +services -- Should I also add +induction +heating +services or will +induction +heat +services cover all variations of the word "heat"?

2. It seems like using BMM and putting pluses in front of all the words in your keyword almost always seems like a better option than phrase match so why do so many people use phrase match almost exclusively? Why do I seem to never hear about BMM/why isn't BMM more popular or more talked about as a good match type option?

Example: "induction heating specialists" is perfectly acceptable, but why not just make it +induction +heat +specialists so that you know all your relevant terms will be included, but you also won't have to worry about the order people type in the words or if they throw some other words in between your "plus sign" keywords? I want to make sure I'm not missing a very important point or reason why I should use phrase match over BMM. Of course I understand that sometimes if other words are thrown in, it could really make your ads irrelevant, which is a good instance to use phrase match. However, it seems like people use phrase match too much therefore making a lot of their keywords more restrictive than necessary. 

3. With BMM, I'm not quite sure I really understand the point of ever having any of your keywords NOT have a plus sign. 

Example: If I want +induction +heating +services to be a keyword, why would I remove the plus sign from, say, "services"? If I want to do that, shouldn't I just make the keyword +induction +heating? In other words, if I'm using BMM, how is value assigned to any words that DON'T have a plus sign? 

 

I've been in digital marketing for 7+ years, but I've never spent tons of time working in Google Ads (formerly AdWords). It has just never been a big part of any position that I've held until now so I really want to take the time to understand the subtleties of the interface in order to be certain that I'm using best practice strategies when working on client accounts. 

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Accepted by topic author Danielle K
1w

Still very confused about match types

Follower ✭ ✭ ☆
# 3
Follower ✭ ✭ ☆

Hi Danielle,

 

I hope this helps. The plus sign in broad match modifier means that word (or it's close-match variants) must be included in the search. For instance, "+induction +heating +services" adds will only show if the words "induction," "heating" and "services" are included in the users search.

 

When you remove the "+" it means that a synonym for the word could be included instead. To use the same example, if your keyword was "+induction +heating +services" and someone searched: "induction heating company" your ad would not be triggered since the user's search did not contain the word "services."

 

I hope that helps!

Patrick

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Re: Still very confused about match types

[ Edited ]
Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Hi Danielle,

 

These are all great questions so I will do my best to provide succinct answers:

 

  1. No, you do not need to keep just one keyword. Having keywords that are slight variations will not have a negative impact on the account. While these keywords will compete with each other in terms of which one triggers the ad, this will not impact your CPC since only one ad from your account can show. Here is an article that describes how this process works. Also, "heating" will be a variant of "heat" - more information on how variants work at the bottom of this article.
  2. I have consulted and worked at around 10 search agencies and in my experience phrase match is not more popular than broad modified. The reason that people may prefer phrase match is that it casts a narrower net than BMM so will typically perform better. For example, take the two keywords "buy nike shoes" and +buy +nike +shoes. The BMM version can show on a lot of poor performing terms like "buy returned lots of nike shoes", "buy super cheap nike shoes", "buy shoes with fake nike swoosh", etc. A typical strategy is to use all match types for each keyword and set bids based on the performance of those match types (commonly this will cascade down from exact to phrase to broad). You don't need to just use one or two match types.
  3. Adding the + sign in front of a word requires that the word, or a close variation of the word, must be somewhere in the search query. If you remove the plus sign then that word or a synonym of the word must be in the search query (how regular broad match works). For example, "+induction +heating services" would trigger an ad on the search "induction heating amenities", whereas "+induction +heating +services" would not trigger an ad.
Jim Vaillancourt, AdWords Top Contributor, LinkedIn
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Accepted by topic author Danielle K
1w

Still very confused about match types

Follower ✭ ✭ ☆
# 3
Follower ✭ ✭ ☆

Hi Danielle,

 

I hope this helps. The plus sign in broad match modifier means that word (or it's close-match variants) must be included in the search. For instance, "+induction +heating +services" adds will only show if the words "induction," "heating" and "services" are included in the users search.

 

When you remove the "+" it means that a synonym for the word could be included instead. To use the same example, if your keyword was "+induction +heating +services" and someone searched: "induction heating company" your ad would not be triggered since the user's search did not contain the word "services."

 

I hope that helps!

Patrick

Still very confused about match types

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 4
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Thank you so much! This is incredibly helpful information!

Still very confused about match types

Badged Google Partner
# 5
Badged Google Partner

You never "compete" within an account.

 

Based on your questions, it seems like you are perhaps not taking the actual search queries of each adgroup into consideration. The broader your KW's, the more potential queries the targeted KW's in the ad group can match to. If you are getting too many irrelevant queries, restrict your match types, and add negatives.

 

KW's are just a targeting method. It's the end user query that matters in regards to matching the "right" ad to the "right" query.

Tom