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Spaces and Plurals in Keywords Duplication

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# 1
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I have inherited a number of accounts and campaigns.  All have overlapping keywords. For example, 

 

  • dream park
  • dream parks
  • dreampark
  • dreams park

All broad match. I agrue that these are repetitive, and could be narrowed down to one keyword. Each of these has brought in traffic due to exact match queries, for example someone searched Dream Park, and trigged that keyword, and other have used Dreampark, and that term was triggered. But am I correct in saying that both of those search queries would still fall under Dreams Park (the correct phrase)?

 

Additionally, keeping these broken out like this is splitting the traffic and possibly handicapping the CTR?

 

Assuming consolidating is the correct route, how do you decide which to keep? One has a higher CTR but with low impressions and no conversions, another has conversions but a lower CTR. 

 

Sidenote - My Keyword Match Option is set to include plurals, misspellings and other close variants. Althought it sounds like these options apply to exact and phrase match.  Broad match assumes this is the case I presume. 

 

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Accepted by topic author Kayla W
September 2015

Re: Spaces and Plurals in Keywords Duplication

Top Contributor
# 3
Top Contributor
Hi Kayla,

I will disagree with Leury. Keywords don't really compete, although the one with the highest ad rank will be selected to compete in the general auction.

Often, the difference between singular and plural searches will be intent. Plurals tend to indicate intent to purchase. Singular tend to indicate search for more information rather than intent to purchase. I would take a close look at both the CTR and conversion rates for each of the keywords. If they are profitable, keep them. You may want to bid differently on the singular and plural versions of the same keyword, and that would be the reason for keeping them as separate keywords.

Now, "dream park" and "dream park" are roughly equivalent. Google ignores spaces when matching stuff up. "Dream parks" and "dreams parks" are not the same.

One last word of advice on this: trust the data and make your decisions based on that. Every case (account/campaign/adGroup) will be different.

Best of Luck!

Pete
petebardo -- Deadhead doing AdWords

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Re: Spaces and Plurals in Keywords Duplication

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 2
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
Hey Kayla,

You are correct with your assumptions. Especially, if you have plurals, misspellings and other close variants on.

If I am not mistaking, what the current set up would do is make these keywords compete against each other. This in turn, will affect CTR and traffic like you stated. As for consolidation, the easiest to drop would be the one that are plural, since you already have the singular variant.

I would image keeping “dream park” would make the most sense, since that is the main Keyword that is being targeted? By keeping this one, it should also show up for the other variants that are currently in that ad group as well.
Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author Kayla W
September 2015

Re: Spaces and Plurals in Keywords Duplication

Top Contributor
# 3
Top Contributor
Hi Kayla,

I will disagree with Leury. Keywords don't really compete, although the one with the highest ad rank will be selected to compete in the general auction.

Often, the difference between singular and plural searches will be intent. Plurals tend to indicate intent to purchase. Singular tend to indicate search for more information rather than intent to purchase. I would take a close look at both the CTR and conversion rates for each of the keywords. If they are profitable, keep them. You may want to bid differently on the singular and plural versions of the same keyword, and that would be the reason for keeping them as separate keywords.

Now, "dream park" and "dream park" are roughly equivalent. Google ignores spaces when matching stuff up. "Dream parks" and "dreams parks" are not the same.

One last word of advice on this: trust the data and make your decisions based on that. Every case (account/campaign/adGroup) will be different.

Best of Luck!

Pete
petebardo -- Deadhead doing AdWords