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Same keywords with/without modifiers

Follower ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Follower ✭ ✭ ✭

Can anybody tell me what will happen in this scenario:

 

I've 4 keywords:

1) hello world

2) +hello world

3) +hello +world

4) hello +world

 

if somebody enters broad term "hello world" in google search, then which keyword will be triggered - in case of very new campaign and also in case of already running campaigns ?

1 Expert replyverified_user

Re: Same keywords with/without modifiers

Follower ✭ ✭ ✭
# 2
Follower ✭ ✭ ✭

Hi utilitiesindia,

 

As per my understanding, Google triggers keywords with the tightest keyword match variation.

So, in this case +hello +world should trigger as it's the most tightest keyword match type in the given keywords list.

 

 

~Rehan

Re: Same keywords with/without modifiers

Top Contributor Alumni
# 3
Top Contributor Alumni

1) hello world : This will be eligible to trigger ads for any search query that contains "hello" or "world"

2) +hello world: This will be eligible to tirgger your ads for any search query that contains "hello"

3) +hello +world: This will be eligible to tirgger your ads for any search query that contains "hello" and "world"

4) hello +world: This will be eligible to tirgger your ads for any search query that contains "world"

This is what I know theoratically I have never used +sign with just one word in phrase as i belive that will generate a lot of irrelevant traffic

Hope this helps

Regards

Nik

 

Regards, Nik
LinkedIn  |   @nikhilparachure | My Blog
Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author utilitiesindia
September 2015

Re: When Several Keywords Match a Search Query, Which One is Used?

Top Contributor
# 4
Top Contributor

Hi utilitiesindia;

 

This is not an easy question.  The decision made by the system involves several parameters and in different scenarios. The underlying rule  breaks into 3:

  • A keyword that most closely matches the query;
  • The most restrictive match type
  • The highest ad-rank

 

Understanding  how these work together, requires some learning. Here is a 3 part article on this topic:

  1. When Several Keywords Match a Search Query, Which One is Used? - Part 1
  2. When Several Keywords Match a Search Query, Which One is Used? - Part 2
  3. When Several Keywords Match a Search Query, Which One is Used? - Part 3

(Many details involved. Make yourself a cup of coffee, and have some time without interruptions, before you dig into these articles Smiley Surprised)

 

-Moshe

 

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer’

Re: When Several Keywords Match a Search Query, Which One is Used?

Explorer ✭ ✭ ✭
# 5
Explorer ✭ ✭ ✭

Follow Up Sir MosheTLV: Having been said that the above question is not easy, have you ever tried that technique? This might be an overlooked niche if proven effective on a case to case scenario. Smiley Happy

More Power,
Loraine

Re: When Several Keywords Match a Search Query, Which One is Used?

[ Edited ]
Follower ✭ ✭ ✭
# 6
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I talked to Google Adwords helpline and I was told similar explanation as given by Moshe.

In fact I did see it in action when I added a non-broad-modifier version keyword along with already running broad-modifier keyword, and to my surprise it was the broad modifier version got the clicks.

 

So it looks like Ad rank, quality score and/or restrictive match are considered.

 

I see a good potential to save money using such keyword combinations.