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Regarding Keywords

Follower ✭ ☆ ☆
# 1
Follower ✭ ☆ ☆

Hi All,

 

I have a doubt while I was creating new keywords. If I have a keyword like red +running +shoes and +running +shoes for sale, will they be competing against each other?

 

Because both the keywords has +running +shoes as BMM, and are common, can I use these two keywords in the same adgroup?

 

Let me know your thoughts.

 

Thanks,

 

Rajashree

 

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1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions
Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author Sheema T
September 2015

Re: Regarding Keywords

Participant ✭ ✭ ✭
# 5
Participant ✭ ✭ ✭
Hi Rajashree,

That is what I was talking about in my post regarding separate ad groups and embedded negatives. If you are going to be targeting those keywords, then they are different enough to justify separate ad groups.

Just make sure that you add negatives to the other ad groups (embedded negatives) so that the search query gets matched to the correct keyword and therefore ad. Just be aware of what you are doing, and to have a 'general' type ad group.

For example if you have an ad group for 'red running shoes' and one for 'running shoes for men' and so you put red as a negative in the men group and men as a negative in the red group then the search query 'red running shoes for men' will not be able to match anywhere and thus you will loose out on that search query.

The other option is to loosen up the themes of your ad groups but in order to get a more tailored ad to your audience (eg. Red Running Shoes as a headline for that search query) then you can use DKI in your ad. (I personally don't like DKI as I feel it is the lazy approach and tends to lend to choice fatigue on the SERP, but it does have its merits)

A third option is to just be more liberal with your modifier, namely add the keyword +red +running +shoes (BMM the red as well). This will make for better search query matching but your keywords need be carefully thought out and again I would advise a 'general' type ad group with less restrictions so that you are able to catch all the traffic you do not think about and add to your account at a later stage.

At the end of the day, there are many ways to set up your account and it is best to do it the way you feel most comfortable. Each have their own merits as well as pit falls, but as long as you understand how it all fits together you can usually avoid most of the pit falls.

I would suggest reading the article I linked to get a full understanding of how keywords are triggered and matched and then make a personal choice of which structure works best for you.

Hope this helps

View solution in original post

Re: Regarding Keywords

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Hello,

 

Please note that at one time, only single keyword per account will be triggering ad for the search query being searched online in Google AdWords.

 

Rest it all depends upon what type of search queries you are getting and which keywords are best in providing better results for you in terms of ROI.

 

I would suggest you to read this help center article on how similar keywords are matched to the search terms: https://support.google.com/adwords/answer/2756257?hl=en

 

I hope this helps!

Pankaj

Re: Regarding Keywords

[ Edited ]
Participant ✭ ✭ ✭
# 3
Participant ✭ ✭ ✭

Hi Rajashree,

The simple answer is yes. Those 2 keywords can be triggered by the same search query.

They will not compete with each other at an auction level but rather Google will select the best 'fitting' keyword according to the users search query and other related factors (such as session based data) and this keyword will then enter the auction. If they are in the same ad group this will be less problematic for you as they will both serve the same ads.

But given the specificity of the keywords I would consider having them in separate ad groups with embedded negatives. 'Red' and 'for sale' are different enough that it may be beneficial to send users to different pages and serve them different ads. For sale, and Red can have different user intent behind the searchers, such as the person searching for sales may have more of a buyers intent, as an example.

Learn how keywords are matched here:
https://support.google.com/adwords/answer/2756257?hl=en

Hope this helps

Re: Regarding Keywords

Follower ✭ ☆ ☆
# 4
Follower ✭ ☆ ☆
Hi Clynton and Pankaj,

What if running shoes is a mandatory keyword for our business, and we have it as Broad match modifier along with other keywords. Our Adgroups are divided theme wise but each adgroup has running shoes eg. Adgroup - Running Shoes, Keywords - +Running +shoes for trekking, red +running +shoes, +running +shoes for men etc.

Is the structure of the Adgroup ok ?

Let me know your thoughts,

Thanks,

Rajashree

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author Sheema T
September 2015

Re: Regarding Keywords

Participant ✭ ✭ ✭
# 5
Participant ✭ ✭ ✭
Hi Rajashree,

That is what I was talking about in my post regarding separate ad groups and embedded negatives. If you are going to be targeting those keywords, then they are different enough to justify separate ad groups.

Just make sure that you add negatives to the other ad groups (embedded negatives) so that the search query gets matched to the correct keyword and therefore ad. Just be aware of what you are doing, and to have a 'general' type ad group.

For example if you have an ad group for 'red running shoes' and one for 'running shoes for men' and so you put red as a negative in the men group and men as a negative in the red group then the search query 'red running shoes for men' will not be able to match anywhere and thus you will loose out on that search query.

The other option is to loosen up the themes of your ad groups but in order to get a more tailored ad to your audience (eg. Red Running Shoes as a headline for that search query) then you can use DKI in your ad. (I personally don't like DKI as I feel it is the lazy approach and tends to lend to choice fatigue on the SERP, but it does have its merits)

A third option is to just be more liberal with your modifier, namely add the keyword +red +running +shoes (BMM the red as well). This will make for better search query matching but your keywords need be carefully thought out and again I would advise a 'general' type ad group with less restrictions so that you are able to catch all the traffic you do not think about and add to your account at a later stage.

At the end of the day, there are many ways to set up your account and it is best to do it the way you feel most comfortable. Each have their own merits as well as pit falls, but as long as you understand how it all fits together you can usually avoid most of the pit falls.

I would suggest reading the article I linked to get a full understanding of how keywords are triggered and matched and then make a personal choice of which structure works best for you.

Hope this helps