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Question About Advanced Location Options

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Hi All, 

 

I have a client who runs a cleaning service. He operates in four states: Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, and Tennessee. Up until now he has been running 4 campaigns each targeted to a state subdivided by job type: Office Cleaning, House Cleaning, etc. It was set up using Phrase Match and I have been encouraging him to use Modified Broad Match. Keywords include general "office cleaning companies" and location specific "office cleaning companies in Georgia". 

 

Here's my question: I've suggested we simplify the account by creating only two campaigns: Cleaning Services (creating Ad Groups from job type as before) and using the general keywords (i.e. +office +cleaning +companies) and a Location Specific (broken down by State) and using location specific keywords (i.e. +office +cleaning +companies +Georgia). The difference would be that the general kw campaign would be targeted using Physical Location Only and the location specific campaign would be targeted using Search Intent only.

 

My thinking is that I could then provide job type specific ads and destination urls to people searching generally and location specific ads and destination urls for those searching for services in a specific location. Additionally, I could better control cost as the more specific keywords tend to have a higher bid rate.

 

My concerns are:

  1. I will lose years of historic data by introducing new campaigns and ads. Also, if you use an existing kw phrase in a new campaign, does its positive (or negative) karma travel with it? Or would it be reborn anew? And, could I circumvent this by leaving the old campaigns running and phasing the budgets over gradually?
  2. If a location specific kw phrase shows "Low Search Volume" will the general kw trigger an ad, i.e. if someone in Mississippi searched for "office cleaning companies in Memphis" would the keyword "+office +cleaning +company" trigger an ad or would the client miss the impression?
  3. We have been losing CTR for location specific kw phrases such as "house cleaning Atlanta" getting high impressions and no clicks. I am hoping to isolate this so that I can deal with it on a location by location basis.
  4. Am I wasting my time and the client's money? 

 

Any and all help is very appreciated. These are probably simple questions but I've been mentally chasing my tail for weeks!

1 Expert replyverified_user
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Marked as Best Answer.
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Accepted by Liz (Follower ✭ ✭ ☆)
September 2015

Re: Question About Advanced Location Options

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Hi Scott,

 

I think your plan would be a mistake. The 4 geo-targeted campaigns are probably a better idea. Do you have separate landing pages specifically for the different locations and services? If not, I would recommend that.

 

Thing is, if you combine all campaigns, it will not be as immediately clear to the user that the service is available in their local area. If you lived in Georgia and searched for "office cleaning companies", would you be more likely to click on the ad that says "Office Cleaning in Georgia", or the ad that says "Southeast US Office Cleaning". I would think the one with Georgia in it would get more clicks. And if you were located in Atlanta, wouldn't an ad that says "Atlanta Office Cleaning" be even more enticing.

 

The usual recommendation is to go more granular with multiple geo-targeted campaigns and tightly focused ad groups. You're planning on going the opposite direction. You can make up your keyword lists as shared resources and easily apply to multiple campaigns. So, work on one state and get all the keywords and ad groups set up the way you want, then copy that structure to each of the other campaigns.

 

I would even recommend targeting smaller areas, like the major metropolitan areas in each state (be sure to exclude those areas from the state-wide campaign) so you can show more localized versions of your ad.

 

On some of your questions:

 

1. You don't lose the history, it just stays where it is. It is always available for review. Its "karma" will travel with it to a certain extent. When you first enter the keyword, QS is determined by comparing to the text of your ad, the copy on your landing page (and maybe a few others) and the past performanc of the keyword in your account, for your domain and accross all advertiser accounts.

 

2. Low Search Volume means that it will not trigger your ad if only one person or a few, your ad will not be triggered. Google considers that a privacy risk for the user. If someone in Mississippi searched for "office cleaning companies in Memphis" could the keyword "+office +cleaning +company" trigger an ad.

 

3. When the user searches for "house cleaning Atlanta", are you showing yoru ad for house cleaning? Check with the ad preview tool. Set your location to Atlanta, enter the search query. Is it the ad for house cleaning? If not, you have some work to do, like adding negatives to your office cleaning group. As I mentioned above, Atlanta may be better served with a campaign of its own including "Atlanta" in the headline or the copy or both.

 

4. Are you wasting your time? Not by asking question here first before taking such drastic action with the account. I do believe you will get better results by adding more campaigns and ad groups rather than combining all into one big campaign. Get more sepecific and use the ad preview tool extensively to make sure you are getting the results you and your client need.

 

Best of Luck!

 

Pete

 

petebardo -- Deadhead doing AdWords

View solution in original post

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by Liz (Follower ✭ ✭ ☆)
September 2015

Re: Question About Advanced Location Options

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Hi Scott,

 

I think your plan would be a mistake. The 4 geo-targeted campaigns are probably a better idea. Do you have separate landing pages specifically for the different locations and services? If not, I would recommend that.

 

Thing is, if you combine all campaigns, it will not be as immediately clear to the user that the service is available in their local area. If you lived in Georgia and searched for "office cleaning companies", would you be more likely to click on the ad that says "Office Cleaning in Georgia", or the ad that says "Southeast US Office Cleaning". I would think the one with Georgia in it would get more clicks. And if you were located in Atlanta, wouldn't an ad that says "Atlanta Office Cleaning" be even more enticing.

 

The usual recommendation is to go more granular with multiple geo-targeted campaigns and tightly focused ad groups. You're planning on going the opposite direction. You can make up your keyword lists as shared resources and easily apply to multiple campaigns. So, work on one state and get all the keywords and ad groups set up the way you want, then copy that structure to each of the other campaigns.

 

I would even recommend targeting smaller areas, like the major metropolitan areas in each state (be sure to exclude those areas from the state-wide campaign) so you can show more localized versions of your ad.

 

On some of your questions:

 

1. You don't lose the history, it just stays where it is. It is always available for review. Its "karma" will travel with it to a certain extent. When you first enter the keyword, QS is determined by comparing to the text of your ad, the copy on your landing page (and maybe a few others) and the past performanc of the keyword in your account, for your domain and accross all advertiser accounts.

 

2. Low Search Volume means that it will not trigger your ad if only one person or a few, your ad will not be triggered. Google considers that a privacy risk for the user. If someone in Mississippi searched for "office cleaning companies in Memphis" could the keyword "+office +cleaning +company" trigger an ad.

 

3. When the user searches for "house cleaning Atlanta", are you showing yoru ad for house cleaning? Check with the ad preview tool. Set your location to Atlanta, enter the search query. Is it the ad for house cleaning? If not, you have some work to do, like adding negatives to your office cleaning group. As I mentioned above, Atlanta may be better served with a campaign of its own including "Atlanta" in the headline or the copy or both.

 

4. Are you wasting your time? Not by asking question here first before taking such drastic action with the account. I do believe you will get better results by adding more campaigns and ad groups rather than combining all into one big campaign. Get more sepecific and use the ad preview tool extensively to make sure you are getting the results you and your client need.

 

Best of Luck!

 

Pete

 

petebardo -- Deadhead doing AdWords

Re: Question About Advanced Location Options

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 3
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Thanks for the responses! Would you mind clarifying further?

 

The reason I even proposed such a change was that the general kw phrases "office cleaning", "house cleaners", etc. are duplicated in every state campaign. Less competition in some markets means better performance than in others. We run into a problem where our core kw phrases aren't showing ads in our prime markets because the same kw in another campaign outranks it. This is why I wanted a central all encompassing campaign for the general kws -- to eliminate kw duplication between campaigns.

 

1. So if I create a new account with the kw phrase "office cleaning service" it starts fresh, even though that same keyword has been active in another campaign for five years?

 

2. My question is if I have "+Mississippi +house +cleaners" in one campaign exclusively targeted to Mississippi but it has low search volume and "+house +cleaner" in another campaign also targeted to include Mississippi, will a search for "house cleaners in Mississippi" trigger an ad from "+house +cleaner" kw phrase or will the low search volume kw phrase cancel it out?

 

3. Each job type has its own landing page ( /office-cleaning.htm) as does each state ( /cleaning-geogia.htm). I am using ad text such as "Professional Office Cleaning" for general kw phrases and "{KeyWord:Alabama Office Cleaning}" for location specific terms within each state campaign. Clicks on the general ad would go to the house cleaning or office cleaning or whatever appropriate landing page, whereas clicks on the location specific ad would take the user to the state specific page.

 

Again thanks for the help! I'm afraid I've overthought this about 200%.

 

 

 

 

Re: Question About Advanced Location Options

Top Contributor
# 4
Top Contributor

Hi Scott,

 

Let's take a look at some of your questions here.

 

"We run into a problem where our core kw phrases aren't showing ads in our prime markets because the same kw in another campaign outranks it." That shouldn't be happening if you are properly geo-targeting your campaigns  If each campaign is properly targeted at one state and only one state, your keywords do not compete between campaigns. If you have 2 campaigns targeted at the same area, that could be a problem. Instead, you might want one campaign for the area with 2 or more ad groups targeting the different parts of your business.

 

"1. So if I create a new account with the kw phrase "office cleaning service" it starts fresh, even though that same keyword has been active in another campaign for five years?" That's not exactly true. The data will start fresh in the new campaign/adGroup, but the history of that keyword performance remains with the original adGroup. The keyword's past performance in your account and for your domain and across all accounts is part of the Quality Score.

 

"2. My question is if I have "+Mississippi +house +cleaners" in one campaign exclusively targeted to Mississippi but it has low search volume and "+house +cleaner" in another campaign also targeted to include Mississippi, will a search for "house cleaners in Mississippi" trigger an ad from "+house +cleaner" kw phrase or will the low search volume kw phrase cancel it out?" In your campaign exclusively targeted at Mississippi, if the campaign is set to include "search intent" and the query is "house cleaners in Mississippi" would enter the auction for your keyword "+house +cleaner" in the Mississippi group. Running two campaigns targeting the same state is probably not the optimal organization in your case. Say in the one campaign you have only "+Mississippi +house +cleaners" and in the other group you have "+house +cleaners". The group with "+Mississippi +house +cleaners" shows low search volume and will not trigger any ads.

 

"3. Each job type has its own landing page ( /office-cleaning.htm) as does each state ( /cleaning-geogia.htm). I am using ad text such as "Professional Office Cleaning" for general kw phrases and "{KeyWord:Alabama Office Cleaning}" for location specific terms within each state campaign. Clicks on the general ad would go to the house cleaning or office cleaning or whatever appropriate landing page, whereas clicks on the location specific ad would take the user to the state specific page."

 

Oh, are you using DKI  and trying to get it to trigger when location specific keywords are included in the query? That's a whole different story. I'm not a big fan of DKI. Others on this forum will disagree. I am particularly not a fan of DKI for this purpose. It's just not necessary and it is terribly complex and often produces unexpected results. I would suggest you combine your state campaigns (not all of them, just state-by-state). Place two or more ads in each ad group. At least one of the ads should have the headline "Professional Office Cleaning" and one ad "Alabama Office Cleaning".

 

Set them to rotate evenly, then give it a little time (100 clicks or so, depending on how long it takes to get that many clicks) to accrue some data in a head-to-head test, all other variables being somewhat equal. See which performs better. I'm betting on "Alabama Office Cleaning".

 

This is also why I suggested targeting specific metropolitan areas within the states (and excluded from the state-wide campaign), so you would have a campaign for Mobile with a headline "Mobile Office Cleaning". If I were in Mobile, that would be much more attractive than an ad that says "Alabama Office Cleaning". I would suggest this strategy for the major metro areas in each state. You might start with separating out campaigns for just the largest metro area in each state.

 

In summary, one campaign per state, separate ad groups for office and home cleaning, multiple test ads in each group with tightly focused keywords, drop DKI for now.

 

I hope this helps,,

 

Best of Luck!

 

Pete


petebardo -- Deadhead doing AdWords