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Quality Score - Expected CTR, AD Relevance, Landing Page

Follower ✭ ✭ ☆
# 1
Follower ✭ ✭ ☆

Hello,

I install a Adwords script from Karooya to analyse quality score in detail. I think it is a good script.
1 - One of the things the script gives us, it decomposes the Quality Score in their components: Expected CTR, Ad Relevance and Landing Page Experience.
Well, one of the things I don't know how to optimze it is the Expected CTR. What parameters hould I look or change in the account to optimize this component of quality score (if it's below the average)?
2 - The other thing I don't quite understand why I get a below average Expected CTR and Ad Relevance n some keywords when this KW "allow" the ad to be is the first position?
3 - The same happens when I only get the Expected CTR below average.

Anyone to clarify this. ThanksScreen Shot 2017-03-28 at 11.08.31.png

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Accepted by topic author João M
April 2017

Quality Score - Expected CTR, AD Relevance, Landing Page

Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆
# 4
Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆

Hi

Optimizing ads you can get better Ad Relevancy factor, not Expected CTR.

If you have "Below Average Expected CTR" but "Above Average Ad Relevancy" means you have done almost everything to get better Quality Score on AdWords. You can also improve Landing Page Experience factor if you need.

 

Changing bids it's totally different question, not related to your Quality Score. My quick advice - change strategy to maximize ROI or Revenue. But it's long story to explain that with details.

 

According to my experience, you cannot optimize Expected CTR, I don't care about this, but if my Quality Score is low, it's a reason to pause this keyword. At least, with "Below Average Expected CTR" you can get Quality Score about 7, or maybe 8 - so tough.

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Quality Score - Expected CTR, AD Relevance, Landing Page

Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆
# 2
Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆

Hi João!

First of all expected CTR is not your real CTR. You can use keyword with "below average" and get CTR about 10% and vice versa.

 

1 expected CTR is based on historical performance of this keyword and it's precision. General words have usually lower expected CTR than very precise ones.

For example word "windows" is general, may be used in many contexts and topics and probably it's expected CTR will be below average. But if use a keyword "white windows to kitchen", it's much more specific and users more likely to click it, so expected CTR will be averege or above average. Also matching type plays a key role to determine this factor. You can see that on your picture too.

 

2, 3 You can use low quality keywords but exceed your ad rank by your bids or poor competitors.

Quality Score - Expected CTR, AD Relevance, Landing Page

Follower ✭ ✭ ☆
# 3
Follower ✭ ✭ ☆

@Łukasz S Hi!

Expected CTR Optimization: Considering the "Expected CTR" definition I probably have to look for poor ads and optimize them/thight them to the keyword. But what about if I have "Below Average Expected CTR" but "Above Average Ad Relevancy". Doesn't make much sense going to optimize the ads.

Should I raise my bids or lower them? And if my bid strategy is max clicks and the Max CPC is in Auto?

Any suggestions on how to optimize the Expected CTR? Should I even care for that parameter in the Quality Score?

Thanks.

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author João M
April 2017

Quality Score - Expected CTR, AD Relevance, Landing Page

Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆
# 4
Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆

Hi

Optimizing ads you can get better Ad Relevancy factor, not Expected CTR.

If you have "Below Average Expected CTR" but "Above Average Ad Relevancy" means you have done almost everything to get better Quality Score on AdWords. You can also improve Landing Page Experience factor if you need.

 

Changing bids it's totally different question, not related to your Quality Score. My quick advice - change strategy to maximize ROI or Revenue. But it's long story to explain that with details.

 

According to my experience, you cannot optimize Expected CTR, I don't care about this, but if my Quality Score is low, it's a reason to pause this keyword. At least, with "Below Average Expected CTR" you can get Quality Score about 7, or maybe 8 - so tough.

Quality Score - Expected CTR, AD Relevance, Landing Page

Top Contributor
# 5
Top Contributor

The key here is  that all scores are relatives. So even if your CTR is high, it has to be much higher than most other advertisers are bidding for the same keyword in order to be above average.

In competitive verticals this could be somewhat tough.  Currently you  win the first position because of a  much higher bid. 

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer’

Quality Score - Expected CTR, AD Relevance, Landing Page

Top Contributor
# 6
Top Contributor

@Łukasz S; I respectfully disagree; 

"First of all expected CTR is not your real CTR.", "Optimizing ads you can get better Ad Relevancy factor, not Expected CTR"

Expected CTR is a calculation  of  clicks on the ad. Clicks on the ad are in direct correlation to ad-copy. Hence optimizing the ad-copy can improve CTR.

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer’

Quality Score - Expected CTR, AD Relevance, Landing Page

Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆
# 7
Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆

@MosheTLV I know it's sounds odd, but

  • This expected clickthrough rate is a prediction, so it's different from the actual clickthrough rates shown in the "CTR" column of your account. Unlike the "CTR" column, this status considers how the keyword performs both within your account and across all other advertisers' accounts. This status has also been adjusted to eliminate the influence of ad position and other factors that affect visibility, such as extensions.
  • It's possible for a keyword to have a high Quality Score and low expected clickthrough rate (or vice versa) because AdWords looks at a number of different quality factors when determining Quality Score. Even if your overall Quality Score is high, looking at the individual factors can help you identify potential areas for improvement.

https://support.google.com/adwords/answer/1659696?hl=en

 

Quality Score - Expected CTR, AD Relevance, Landing Page

Top Contributor
# 8
Top Contributor

@Łukasz S

I re-read the question: it  was about improving the CTR (regardless  of the technical definition). So  I disagree with your statement that improving  the  ad cannot improve the CTR (either the "expected" or the reported). Also note, that there is not much difference between the 2: the difference is that the expected takes into  account only clicks in which the search term exactly matches the keyword.

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
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Quality Score - Expected CTR, AD Relevance, Landing Page

[ Edited ]
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# 9
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Hi, I'm curious (as I am in the situation of having "Above Average Ad Relevancy" while having "Below Average Expected CTR"). How do you explain - in simple words - to a client that such scores mean that you have done everything you can? Here I ask the question but I know that, in my specific case, there is room for improvement as far as landing-pages go.

Quality Score - Expected CTR, AD Relevance, Landing Page

[ Edited ]
Top Contributor
# 10
Top Contributor

@Adrien O;

Improving the CTR  does require some work by the advertiser and it can be improved (e.g match types, negative keywords, ad-copy etc....)

Landing page experience is a machine learning statistical algorithm. And this is far from  being perfect. So, the client should understand that you are working to improve the CTR, but if the landing page meets the guidelines and yet gets a score of an  "average" - this could happen in statistics.

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer’