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Order of words in a keyword

Follower ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Follower ✭ ✭ ✭

Hello!

 

Does the order of words really matter in a BROAD match like this:

 

transmission repair +North +Point

or

+North +Point transmission repair

 

Will it make sense to have both?

 

Thank you,

1 Expert replyverified_user
Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by MosheTLV (Top Contributor)
September 2015

Re: Order of words in a keyword

Participant ✭ ✭ ☆
# 2
Participant ✭ ✭ ☆
Great question, Dimitry! As far as broad match goes, both of those are essentially the same keyword so, as you suspected, you don't need both.

Hope this helps!

Re: Order of words in a keyword

Top Contributor
# 3
Top Contributor

Hi Dmitry,

 

Out of curiosity, why would you not specify that 'transmission' be a required part of search queries to match your keyword? +transmission repair +north +point for instance.

 

Is 'North Point' the most important part of that keyword? As you may already be able to determine by reviewing your search terms reports, Google has free reign when you use straight broad match terms. If you're in the business of strictly repairing/installing/rebuilding transmissions, personally, (or if that was the specific focus of a particular ad group) I would prefer to add that one extra level of control for increased relevancy in this specific ad group.

 

Broad match terms alone are great for increasing your reach and for mining new/additional keywords (and negative terms) for sure, but sometimes, they can be more detrimental than helpful. The use of the broad match modifier is a great happy medium between extended reach and maintaining some level of control.

 

Obviously, I don't know but you may already have great strategies for your campaigns/ad groups/keyword selections etc...I just wanted to offer some food for thought. Smiley Happy

 

-Tommy

Tommy Sands, AdWords Top Contributor | Community Profile | Twitter | Philly Marketing Labs
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Re: Order of words in a keyword

[ Edited ]
Follower ✭ ✭ ✭
# 4
Follower ✭ ✭ ✭

Tommy, it's pretty simple really. We started with the set of keywords for each specific service(per separate adgroup) auto repair shop usually performs (BROAD match), added and later improved negative keyword set. Got great results, great conversions.

Now we just want to broaden the set of keywords. We are obviously targeting specific areas (using target radius), but wanted to test if adding same keywords we always had but combined now with specific location names will help to increase the volume.

 

Hope this makes sense.

 

D

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by MosheTLV (Top Contributor)
September 2015

Re: Order of words in a keyword

Collaborator ✭ ☆ ☆
# 5
Collaborator ✭ ☆ ☆
When it comes to the adwords interface, they are two different keywords, they will have different statistics like different CTR and quality score ,AND AdWords will prefer to use the keyword with the highest Ad Rank when they match a search term.

However, in terms of the search quires they will match, they are the same, there is no difference, since the order of the words doesn't matter.

Re: Order of words in a keyword

Follower ✭ ✭ ✭
# 6
Follower ✭ ✭ ✭
So Ahmed, does that mean it's better to have both? Just in case? Smiley Happy

Re: Order of words in a keyword

Collaborator ✭ ☆ ☆
# 7
Collaborator ✭ ☆ ☆
In my opinion, "NO". it would not make a big difference.

Re: Order of words in a keyword

Follower ✭ ✭ ✭
# 8
Follower ✭ ✭ ✭
It made me think now - and it may become a totally different discussion but anyway...

Say it's a Auto Repair Shop in City A. Campaign is targeting 15 mi radius around lat/lng of the business location.

The way campaign is structured now is that every individual service has it's own adgroup with related set of keywords. Ad copies obviously contains City A name in them.

If I want to expand the set of keywords by adding specific names of the cities inside this 15 mi radius (say there are also cities B and C inside it), why instead of adding keywords with added city name into existing adgroups not to create additional adgroups, this time containing these extended keywords with additional city names, and create related ad copies with these cities?

Higher QS and volume, no?

D

Re: Order of words in a keyword

Collaborator ✭ ✭ ✭
# 9
Collaborator ✭ ✭ ✭

Hello Dmitry P,

 

Do you plan to use DKI with these keywords ? If yes, it will insert the keyword using the word order in the keyword.

 

Re: Order of words in a keyword

Participant ✭ ✭ ☆
# 10
Participant ✭ ✭ ☆

Hi Dimitry,

 

Just to confirm that I understand...

 

You currently have a campaign targeted to a city.  For the sake of this example, let's call it Chicago.

Within your Chicago campaign, you have ad groups for each service (a/c repair, engine repair, etc.)

 

You would like to add geo-modified keywords, such as Chicago A/C repair, Chicago engine repair and are wondering if it makes sense to add them into the current ad groups or create new, is that right?

 

If so,  I would actually create a separate campaign because your targeting might change slightly.  If searchers are using the location in their search. you may be able to loosen up your geotargeting into a further radius. This is especially true for small cities with large rural areas around them.  For example, it would be unlikely that someone 20 miles from a Chicago location would be interested in battling traffic to drive 20 miles to a repair shop.  However, if you look at a place like Bloomington, IN, it wouldn't be unrealistic for someone to drive 20 miles from a rural area to service their car.  I would also expect these campaigns to perform well, maybe even better than your current campaigns.  If you're ever in a situation where your budget is restricted, you might want to give these campaigns precedence, which you couldn't do if they were only ad groups (unless you paused the non-geo-modified ad groups).

 

Of course having separate campaigns or ad groups for these types of keywords would require a little extra negative matching to ensure that they weren't competing against their generic counter-parts.

 

Hope this helps - looking forward to hearing other opinions!