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New Auction Insights!

Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆
# 1
Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆

Hello

 

Long time,hope all you guys are doing well.

 

I was going through the new feature which google has empowered its advertisers with, the "auction insights", in my account. Hence,few confusions popped in my mind for which I want your insights.

 

# 1) There are 2 absolutely identical campaigns with the only difference that one campaign targets only "mobile devices" and other targets only "desktops and laptops". Now for a search query would the ads from both the campaigns fight it out in the same auction?

 

# 2) There are 2 absolutely identical campaigns in which one campaign targets "all devices" and another one targets " only mobile". How would the ads fight it out in the auction then?

 

Also,do campaigns targeting any particular device only get any advantage on that device over a similar campaign targeting "all devices"??

 

Google says that all ads that are eligible for a search query enter the ad auction and the ineligible ads targeting other countries and ones which are dissapproved are ignored.

 

But in the above mentioned case I am taking that the ads are all eligible with the only difference that they are targeting different devices for the same search queries. 

 

Rest of the stuff would be more clear with answers to above mentioned.

 

Thanks

Mudit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1 Expert replyverified_user
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Marked as Best Answer.
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Accepted by topic author Mudit
September 2015

Re: New Auction Insights!

Top Contributor
# 5
Top Contributor

I might have misunderstood the case then. Are we talking about different advertisers (in which case my previous answer is irrelevant) or about the same advertiser?

 

Can you please define the situations in terms such as advertiser A and B and campaigns C1 and C2, or something similar?

 

Whenever judging such situations, start with the auction, or with the search. If the search takes place on a mobile device, only campaigns targeting mobile devices (or mobile + desktop) enter the auction. If it takes part on a desktop, campaigns opted into mobile devices alone do not enter the auction. And so on.

Calin Sandici, AdWords Top Contributor | Find me on: Google+ | Twitter | LinkedIn | myBlog
Was my response helpful? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer.’ Learn how here.

View solution in original post

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author Mudit
September 2015

Re: New Auction Insights!

Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆
# 10
Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆

Calin

 

And guess the last para in your post:

 

"Whenever judging such situations, start with the auction, or with the search. If the search takes place on a mobile device, only campaigns targeting mobile devices (or mobile + desktop) enter the auction. If it takes part on a desktop, campaigns opted into mobile devices alone do not enter the auction. And so on."

 

gives me the answer already. The confusion was if device targeting is one of the criteria of eligiblity to take part in the ad auction.

 

When I target only mobile devices in one of my campaigns and go and view the "auction insights" for one of my keywords i see advertisers who were for sure targeting "mobile devices" along with other devices (though this we cant say for sure but mobile devices for sure).

 

And what about the "IS" and "Average position" metrics for them? Would these figures be only for mobile phones (which I only target) or in accordance with all their campaign and targeting settings (mobile+desktops)?

 

Best

Mudit

 

View solution in original post

Re: New Auction Insights!

[ Edited ]
Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Hello, Mudit, welcome back.

 

Here's a thread clearing #1 for you: https://www.en.adwords-community.com/t5/Manage-ads/When-several-keywords-match-a-search-query/td-p/6...

 

As for #2, you're in this situation: http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cacheSmiley TongueSJ4LKqQARoJ:support.google.com/adwords/bin/answe...

 

I'm pasting a web cache link as it seems that the document is being updated, or there's an error.

 

I'll try to include the text as well:

 


When several keywords match a search query, which one is used?

Only one keyword from your account is allowed to trigger an ad per search query. The examples below describe what happens when multiple keywords in your account match a single search query at the same time.

Please note that you can use the Find Duplicate Keywords tool in AdWords Editor to check whether you have multiple identical keywords in your account. (AdWords Editor is a free, downloadable application for managing your AdWords account. Learn how to download it, if you haven't already.)

Within the same ad group, multiple keywords are similar to the search query

Within an ad group, you might have several similar keywords that match a query. For example, the broad-matched keywords "plumber course" and "plumber training course" could both match the search query "training course for plumber".

In this situation, the AdWords system uses a set of preferences to determine which of your keywords to use. The preferences rank approximately in the following order:

 

 

Use a keyword that matches the query exactly, rather than using one that doesn't

If you have a keyword that is identical to the search query, the system will prefer to use this keyword to trigger an ad. This is true even if there are other keywords in your ad group that are similar to the search query.

For example, if the query is "plumber course", and both a broad-match keyword "plumber course" and phrase-match keyword "plumber" exist in your ad group, the system will prefer to use the broad-match keyword that matches the query exactly.

 

 

When keywords are the same but have different match types, use the keyword with the most restrictive...

If you have multiple keywords that are the same, the system will prefer to use the keyword with the more restrictive keyword match type.

For example, if the query is "plumber", and both a broad-match keyword "plumber" and exact-match keyword "plumber" exist in your ad group, the system will prefer to use the exact-match keyword.

 

Use the keyword that has the highest Ad Rank

When several broad-match keywords in your ad group broadly match a search query, the system will prefer to use the keyword with the highest combined Quality Score and cost-per-click (CPC) bid. We call this combination "Ad Rank." Here's an example:

Query: plumber training course
Keyword 1: plumber course, Ad Rank = 1.5
Keyword 2: electrician training course, Ad Rank = 1

Keyword 1 will be preferred because it has a higher Ad Rank.

 

However, the AdWords system has some exceptions that may apply to all of the preferences listed above. The exceptions to the preference rules shown above may occur when:

 

One keyword is contained within another

When one keyword contains the entirety of another keyword, the system prefers to use the longer keyword. This is an exception to the Ad Rank rule above. Here's an example:

Query: training course for plumber
Keyword 1: plumber course
Keyword 2: plumber training course

Keyword 2 will be preferred because it contains all the words in Keyword 1

 

 

There is a cheaper keyword with a higher Quality Score and Ad Rank

On rare occasions, the system will prefer to use a keyword that is cheaper (i.e., it has a lower actual CPC), has a higher Quality Score and a higher Ad Rank. Here's an example:

Query: plumber tool
Keyword 1: plumber tools (maximum CPC bid = $0.10, Quality Score = 7, Ad Rank = 0.7)
Keyword 2: plumber tool (maximum CPC bid = $0.15, Quality Score = 4, Ad Rank = 0.6)

Ordinarily, Keyword 2 would be preferred because it matches the query more closely than Keyword 1. However, Keyword 1 is cheaper, has a higher Quality Score, and has a higher Ad Rank. Therefore, the system will prefer showing Keyword 1 in this instance.

Keep in mind that Quality Score is calculated every time your keyword matches a search query -- that is, every time your keyword has the potential to trigger an ad.

 

Keywords within multiple ad groups are similar to the search query

When multiple ad groups have keywords that match a search query, the AdWords system must make a more complex decision. This is because different ad groups might have different creatives, landing pages, and campaign settings. All of these differences can result in different experiences for users, and can result in different Quality Scores for similar keywords in different ad groups.

In this situation, the AdWords system uses a set of preferences to determine which of your keywords to use. The preferences rank approximately in the following order:

 

Use a keyword that matches the search query exactly, rather than using one that doesn't

If one keyword is identical to the search query, the system will prefer to use that keyword to trigger an ad, regardless of the ad group the keyword is in. This is true even if there are other ad groups with keywords similar to the search query.

For example, suppose the query is "plumber course". If one ad group contains the broad-match keyword "plumber course", while another ad group contains the phrase-match keyword "plumber", the system will prefer to use the broad-match keyword that matches the query exactly.

 

When keywords are the same but have different match types, use the keyword with the most restrictive...

If you have multiple ad groups with keywords that are the same, the system will prefer to use the keyword with the more restrictive keyword match type.

For example, suppose the query is "local plumber". If one ad group contains the broad-match keyword "plumber", while a phrase-match keyword "plumber" is contained in another ad group, the system will prefer to use the phrase-match keyword.

 

Use a keyword from a campaign with the most specific geographical location targeting

If you have multiple campaigns with keywords that similarly match the query, the system will prefer to use the keyword from a campaign that uses more specificlocation targeting.

For example, suppose that the search query is "plumber" and that the search is conducted within New York City. If the keyword "plumber" is within a campaign that targets the New York City metropolitan area, while another keyword "plumber" is within a different campaign that targets the entire United States, the system will prefer to use the keyword from the campaign that targets just New York City.

 

Use the keyword that has the highest Ad Rank

When several ad groups contain keywords that match a search query, the system will prefer to use the keyword with the highest combined Quality Score and cost-per-click (CPC) bid. We call this combination "Ad Rank." Here's an example:

Query: plumber training course 
Keyword from ad group 1: plumber course, Ad Rank = 1.5
Keyword from ad group 2: electrician training course, Ad Rank = 1.0

Keyword 1 will be preferred because it has a higher Ad Rank.

In rare cases, the keyword with the highest Ad Rank might seem to be less relevant to a particular search query than other eligible keywords. Because higher relevance is generally correlated with a higher Ad Rank, this will happen infrequently. To check for it, run a search term report. If you see an instance in which the less relevant keyword triggers an ad, add that search query as a negative keyword to that keyword's ad group.

However, the AdWords system has some exceptions that may apply to all of the preferences listed above. The exceptions to the preference rules shown above may occur when:

 

A campaign is limited by budget

Campaign daily budget can affect each of the scenarios above. If a keyword is in a budget-restricted campaign -- meaning that the campaign's budget isn't high enough to accrue all possible traffic -- the keyword won't always be able to trigger an ad even if it otherwise could. This helps prevent the campaign from exceeding its budget.

For example, let's look at how a budget-restricted campaign would affect keyword use when multiple keywords are the same but have different match types:

Suppose you have the exact-match keyword "plumber" in Campaign 1 and the broad-match keyword "plumber" in Campaign 2. All else being equal, the exact-matched keyword would trigger an ad for the search query "plumber".

If Campaign 1 were budget-restricted, however, then the exact-matched keyword would sometimes be unable to trigger an ad. This would allow the broad-matched keyword in Campaign 2 to trigger an ad instead.

Learn how to figure out the daily budget needed for a campaign to capture all possible traffic.

 

There is a cheaper keyword with a higher Quality Score and Ad Rank

On rare occasions, the system will prefer to use a keyword that is cheaper (i.e., it has a lower actual CPC), has a higher Quality Score, and has a higher Ad Rank. Here's an example:

Query: plumber tool 
Keyword from ad group 1: plumber tools (maximum CPC bid = $0.10, Quality Score = 30, Ad Rank = 3.0)
Keyword from ad group 2: plumber tool (maximum CPC bid = $0.15, Quality Score = 4, Ad Rank = 0.6)

 

Ordinarily, the keyword from ad group 2 would be preferred because it matches the query more closely than the keyword from ad group 1. However, the keyword from ad group 1 is cheaper, has a higher a Quality Score, and has a higher Ad Rank. Therefore, the system will prefer showing the keyword from ad group 1 in this instance.

In rare cases, the keyword with the highest Ad Rank might seem to be less relevant to a particular search query than other eligible keywords. Because higher relevance is generally correlated with a higher Ad Rank, this will happen infrequently. To check for it, run a Search Query Performance report. If you see an instance in which the less relevant keyword triggers an ad, add that search query as a negative keyword to that keyword's ad group.

 

An ad group contains a YouTube Promoted Video

YouTube Promoted Videos are preferred over text ads on YouTube. Here's an example:

Query conducted on YouTube: plumber tool 
Keyword from ad group 1: plumber tool (and is associated with a text ad)
Keyword from ad group 2: plumber tools (and is associated with a YouTube Promoted Video)

 

Ordinarily, the keyword from ad group 1 would be preferred because it matches the query more closely than the keyword from ad group 2. However, the keyword from ad group 2 is associated with a YouTube Promoted Video, and the query was conducted on YouTube. Therefore, the system will prefer showing the keyword from ad group 2 in this instance.


Calin Sandici, AdWords Top Contributor | Find me on: Google+ | Twitter | LinkedIn | myBlog
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Re: New Auction Insights!

Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆
# 3
Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆

Hi Calin

 

I guess my query is not relevant to the links you mentioned. I as well as other advertisers can segment the same campaign or duplicate the same campaign for 2 different devices in the same account (lets say the same campaign for desktops/laptops and  for mobile devices differently).

 

In this case a same keyword present in both campaigns would trigger the ads but for different targetings settings.Now if this is true this means that the eligibility criteria which google talks about in case of "ad auction" takes into account "device targeting" as one of the eligibility criterias.

 

And more importantly what would happen in the case there are 2 duplicate campaigns in 2 different accounts targeting different devices,one targeting desktops/laptops and the other targeting mobile devices. Would the ads from both such accounts take part in the same auction?

 

Thanks

Mudit

 

 

Re: New Auction Insights!

Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆
# 4
Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆

Hi Calin

 

I guess my query is not relevant to the links you mentioned. I as well as other advertisers can segment the same campaign or duplicate the same campaign for 2 different devices in the same account (lets say the same campaign for desktops/laptops and  for mobile devices differently).

 

In this case a same keyword present in both campaigns would trigger the ads but for different targetings settings.Now if this is true this means that the eligibility criteria which google talks about in case of "ad auction" takes into account "device targeting" as one of the eligibility criterias.

 

And more importantly what would happen in the case there are 2 duplicate campaigns in 2 different accounts targeting different devices,one targeting desktops/laptops and the other targeting mobile devices. Would the ads from both such accounts take part in the same auction?

 

Thanks

Mudit

Hi Calin

 

I guess my query is not relevant to the links you mentioned. I as well as other advertisers can segment the same campaign or duplicate the same campaign for 2 different devices in the same account (lets say the same campaign for desktops/laptops and  for mobile devices differently).

 

In this case a same keyword present in both campaigns would trigger the ads but for different targetings settings.Now if this is true this means that the eligibility criteria which google talks about in case of "ad auction" takes into account "device targeting" as one of the eligibility criterias.

 

And more importantly what would happen in the case there are 2 duplicate campaigns in 2 different accounts targeting different devices,one targeting desktops/laptops and the other targeting mobile devices. Would the ads from both such accounts take part in the same auction?

 

Thanks

Mudit

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author Mudit
September 2015

Re: New Auction Insights!

Top Contributor
# 5
Top Contributor

I might have misunderstood the case then. Are we talking about different advertisers (in which case my previous answer is irrelevant) or about the same advertiser?

 

Can you please define the situations in terms such as advertiser A and B and campaigns C1 and C2, or something similar?

 

Whenever judging such situations, start with the auction, or with the search. If the search takes place on a mobile device, only campaigns targeting mobile devices (or mobile + desktop) enter the auction. If it takes part on a desktop, campaigns opted into mobile devices alone do not enter the auction. And so on.

Calin Sandici, AdWords Top Contributor | Find me on: Google+ | Twitter | LinkedIn | myBlog
Was my response helpful? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer.’ Learn how here.

Re: New Auction Insights!

Top Contributor Alumni
# 6
Top Contributor Alumni

HI Mudit

If you can elaborate your issue with example it would help a great deal in getting perfect solution


Regards, Nik
LinkedIn  |   @nikhilparachure | My Blog

Re: New Auction Insights!

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 7
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

I JUST GOT WHAT PROBLEM YOU ARE FACING ACTUALLY . ALTHOUGH I HAVE NEVER FACED ANY PROBLEM LIKE THAT AS MY PRODUCT DONT REALLY TARGET MOBILE USERS . BUT I WOULD ALSO LIKE TO ASK GOOGLE THAT WHY HAVE THE SEGMENETED THE ADS ON THE BASES OF USERS (MOBILE / LAPTOP) WHILE THEY DONT HAVE ANY SEGMENTATION IN AD BIDDING ON THE SAME BASES . THEY SHOULD MAKE IT CLEAR THAT WHAT BID WE ARE PLACING FOR PHONE DEVICE USERS AND THE BID FOR LAPTOP USERS BECAUSE ACCORDING TO WHAT MUDIT IS SAYING I GUESS SEARCH RESULTS WOULD BE DIFFERENTS FOR BOTH THE DEVICE USERS . 

 

PLEASE COMMENT ....

VIPUUL MISHRA 

Re: New Auction Insights!

Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆
# 8
Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆

Hi Vipul

 

In this case what you can do is just segment the same campaign for different targeting devices ie. desktops/laptops and mobile devices.

 

Google gives advertisers enough stats in the "keyword tool" for all device targetings already, so if you want to get an approximation of how a particular keyword would fair on just "mobile devices" you can very well do so.

 

When you duplicate the same campaign (keeping the bids and budget different) on different targeting devices you can monitor and thus optimize both the campaigns for 2 different devices. Allot different budgets to both the campaigns, work on the bids, monitor the output,avg CPC and positions.

 

I guess its more than clear,if any issue feel free to correspond further.

 

Best

Mudit

 

PS- This is not an issue which I am originally discussing in this thread.

Re: New Auction Insights!

Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆
# 9
Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆

Hi Calin

 

SITUATION 1)  Different adveritsers:

 

* Identical Campaigns C1 and C2, but C1 in account A1 targeting only mobile phone and C2 in account A2 targeting only desktops/laptops.

 

* C1 in A1 targeting only mobile devices and C2 in A2 targeting all devices.

 

SITUATION 2) Same advertiser:

 

*C1 targeting only mobile phones and C2 targeting only desktops/laptops.

 

*C1 targeting only mobile phones and C2 targeting all devices.

 

Hope its a bit more clear from beforeSmiley Happy

 

Thanks

Mudit

 

 

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author Mudit
September 2015

Re: New Auction Insights!

Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆
# 10
Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆

Calin

 

And guess the last para in your post:

 

"Whenever judging such situations, start with the auction, or with the search. If the search takes place on a mobile device, only campaigns targeting mobile devices (or mobile + desktop) enter the auction. If it takes part on a desktop, campaigns opted into mobile devices alone do not enter the auction. And so on."

 

gives me the answer already. The confusion was if device targeting is one of the criteria of eligiblity to take part in the ad auction.

 

When I target only mobile devices in one of my campaigns and go and view the "auction insights" for one of my keywords i see advertisers who were for sure targeting "mobile devices" along with other devices (though this we cant say for sure but mobile devices for sure).

 

And what about the "IS" and "Average position" metrics for them? Would these figures be only for mobile phones (which I only target) or in accordance with all their campaign and targeting settings (mobile+desktops)?

 

Best

Mudit