AdWords is now Google Ads. Our new name reflects the full range of advertising options we offer across Search, Display, YouTube, and more. Learn more

Ads
1.7K members online now
1.7K members online now
Improve your Google Ads performance and boost your ROI, CTR, and Quality Score
Guide Me
star_border
Reply

Interesting article on paid and organic Search

Google Employee
# 1
Google Employee

"When marketers have scrutinized Google’s research on how organic and paid search results work together — the search giant concluded that nixing the paid ads would result in a 89% drop in clicks — it’s been clear there’s more to the story. What happens if your brand is the top organic result for the keyword? Surely the results would be different than if your organic result was on the second page?"

.....

 

http://searchengineland.com/google-research-even-if-you-rank-1-organically-you-can-double-your-click...

Yes, I work at Google. I want all AdWords Advertisers to be happy and prosperous
3 Expert replyverified_user
1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions
Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author Eric
September 2015

Re: Interesting article on paid and organic Search

Rising Star
# 3
Rising Star

I wondered the same things, Eric. "Organic" search covers a huge amount of territory. As you say, page one is nothing like page two, and page one or page two are nothing like pages 3-10! And, as more and more people shift to smartphones with those tiny, little screens, page one positioning already isn't what it used to be.

 

[long rambling post deleted]

 

Summary:  These kinds of articles aren't as useful as they might appear at first glance. Searching for a product or searching for a service are different behaviors and an "impulse" search ("where shall we have lunch?") is different from a "research" search ("I want to buy a new car"). There are too many types of searches for me to find data this generic of much real value.

 


Theresa
Google AdWords Top Contributor
*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*

View solution in original post

Yep, quite a few people in my G+ stream have posted it, v...

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Yep, quite a few people in my G+ stream have posted it, very interesting. Though I've seen it for myself, as well. And a customer of mine who decided to pause campaigns for a while only took a month and a half or so to get back in full swing, because things were not at all the same withouth the paid clicks.

Calin Sandici, AdWords Top Contributor | Find me on: Google+ | Twitter | LinkedIn | myBlog
Was my response helpful? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer.’ Learn how here.
Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author Eric
September 2015

Re: Interesting article on paid and organic Search

Rising Star
# 3
Rising Star

I wondered the same things, Eric. "Organic" search covers a huge amount of territory. As you say, page one is nothing like page two, and page one or page two are nothing like pages 3-10! And, as more and more people shift to smartphones with those tiny, little screens, page one positioning already isn't what it used to be.

 

[long rambling post deleted]

 

Summary:  These kinds of articles aren't as useful as they might appear at first glance. Searching for a product or searching for a service are different behaviors and an "impulse" search ("where shall we have lunch?") is different from a "research" search ("I want to buy a new car"). There are too many types of searches for me to find data this generic of much real value.

 


Theresa
Google AdWords Top Contributor
*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*