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Improving Key Word Performance

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

I'm having trouble understanding the whole picture around keyword performance and how to improve it.  (Most of the "help" articles I've read are not very helpful...they tend to be incomplete as if they were written by someone in a hurry.  But that's a topic for another post.)

 

First, here's my site   www.heritagtable.com

 

I have ads that use the terms bbq sauce, stone ground corn meal, and stone ground grits.  Each of those ads lands on the page directly related to the product it advertises.  I use the terms above (and others that are closely related) as keywords.

 

And still I have CTR below 2% and below 1% in many cases.

 

I recently learned about the different match types.  I'm still not quite sure how I should be setting up my match types and I haven't read anything that offers much of a guide.

 

I'm thinking that, for each ad, I should list each keyword three times and put a different match type to each.  (So I'd have stone ground grits as a broad match, as an exact match, and as a phrase match, for example.  Same, then, for the other keywords.)

 

What do you think?

2 Expert replyverified_user
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Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author ohiorick
September 2015

Re: Improving Key Word Performance

[ Edited ]
Participant ✭ ☆ ☆
# 5
Participant ✭ ☆ ☆

Hey OhioRick,

 

First, Bondov is right, you should make sure that you are only targeting Google and Search Partner network. By default, AdWords will include the display network as well, which can dramatically decrease your click-through rate.

 

Secondly, understanding the differences between keyword match types is very important. If you are targeting the keyword 'bbq sauce' with a broad match, you will capture search queries such as 'recipes for bbq sauce', 'bbq restaurants', 'sauces', and so on. The point being that it is difficult to control the type of searches that your ad will appear for. If you are running broad match keywords, you need to continue to view the actual search queries that searchers are using and add negative keywords appropriately (this another match type you need to be aware of.) As a rule of thumb, the broader the keyword the tighter the match type should be.

 

http://support.google.com/adwords/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=6100

 

Also, targeting more descriptive keywords could possibly help, such as 'bbq sauce for sale', 'oder bbq sauce online' and 'buy bbq sauce'. Have you performed keyword research? This will help discover additional keywords that you might not have thought of previously.

 

http://support.google.com/adwords/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=160320

 

Lastly, there is one additional match type that Google has yet to add to their support article. It is 'modified broad' match, which is a hybrid between broad and phrase match. It allows you to have a little more control over the broader keywords in your adgroup but capture more searches that phrase match allows.

 

http://support.google.com/adwords/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=175280

 

So to conclude, opt out of the Display Network targeting, get a grasp on the keyword match types, add negative keywords, the broader the keyword the tighter the phrase match should be, discover new keywords with the keyword tool, and try testing action keywords such as buy, order, for sale, etc.

 

Thanks,

 

BlueIon

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Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author ohiorick
September 2015

Re: Improving Key Word Performance

Top Contributor
# 9
Top Contributor

Interesting discussion here. The original question here, from the way I read it, was how to improve CTR on keywords.

 

While it is a great idea to separate your search and display network campaigns, it is a wrong assumption that running a campaign using both networks will cause your keywords to show a low CTR. That's just not true at all. Keywords in a Display Network campaign do not accrue impressions or clicks and have absolutley no effect on the CTR data for the individual keywords.

 

Low CTR can be caused primarily by 2 things--poorly targeted keywords and poorly written ad copy. Keywords that are too broad will show your ad to people who aren't the least bit interested. Check your search terms often and add negative keywords as appropriate.

 

If your keywords are good and you show a poorly written ad, your CTR will suffer. Always write at least 2 ads for each ad group. Watch the results for long enough to get significant data, then get rid of the poorly performing ad, keep the well performing ad and write a new one to try to beat the "control". I have a couple ad groups where multiple ads perform virtually the same, so I keep both so they will rotate. But I keep writing new ads to try to beat their performance.

 

And then there is the ad position. Ads in top-of-page positions get more clicks as a rule than ads shown on the side, (not always true, but usually), but they might not convert as well as click from side position ads. It could be that your ads are showing in a low position on the side and not getting click because of that. Take a look at where your ads are showing up. With products that sell for a price between $5 and $10, you may not have enough leeway to bid higher on your keywords. That's an option you'll have to examine for yourself based on customer behaviour. If most of your customers continue to buy your products after the first purchase, it's a good idea to calculate or estimate the average lifetime value of a new customer. That might allow you to spend a bit more to bring the customer in as a sort of "loss leader".

 

Best of Luck!

 

Pere

 

petebardo -- Deadhead doing AdWords

View solution in original post

Re: Improving Key Word Performance

[ Edited ]
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 2
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

The first thing you should check - if you're running your ads at search network only. If youre target both - search and GDN, then your avarage CTR will be decreased by low GDN CTR, which use to be in the range of 0.05%-0.5%.

Re: Improving Key Word Performance

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 3
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Can anyone translate that reply for me?

Re: Improving Key Word Performance

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 4
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

translate into what language? Smiley Happy 

 

GDN is Google Display Network

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author ohiorick
September 2015

Re: Improving Key Word Performance

[ Edited ]
Participant ✭ ☆ ☆
# 5
Participant ✭ ☆ ☆

Hey OhioRick,

 

First, Bondov is right, you should make sure that you are only targeting Google and Search Partner network. By default, AdWords will include the display network as well, which can dramatically decrease your click-through rate.

 

Secondly, understanding the differences between keyword match types is very important. If you are targeting the keyword 'bbq sauce' with a broad match, you will capture search queries such as 'recipes for bbq sauce', 'bbq restaurants', 'sauces', and so on. The point being that it is difficult to control the type of searches that your ad will appear for. If you are running broad match keywords, you need to continue to view the actual search queries that searchers are using and add negative keywords appropriately (this another match type you need to be aware of.) As a rule of thumb, the broader the keyword the tighter the match type should be.

 

http://support.google.com/adwords/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=6100

 

Also, targeting more descriptive keywords could possibly help, such as 'bbq sauce for sale', 'oder bbq sauce online' and 'buy bbq sauce'. Have you performed keyword research? This will help discover additional keywords that you might not have thought of previously.

 

http://support.google.com/adwords/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=160320

 

Lastly, there is one additional match type that Google has yet to add to their support article. It is 'modified broad' match, which is a hybrid between broad and phrase match. It allows you to have a little more control over the broader keywords in your adgroup but capture more searches that phrase match allows.

 

http://support.google.com/adwords/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=175280

 

So to conclude, opt out of the Display Network targeting, get a grasp on the keyword match types, add negative keywords, the broader the keyword the tighter the phrase match should be, discover new keywords with the keyword tool, and try testing action keywords such as buy, order, for sale, etc.

 

Thanks,

 

BlueIon

Re: Improving Key Word Performance

[ Edited ]
Top Contributor
# 6
Top Contributor

Hi Ohiorick,

 

Keyword match types are going to be really important in trying to improve your Click Through Rates.

 

Sounds like you already have the structure down - Adgroups built around themes that land visitors on the landing page most relevant to the adgroup theme.  Now sounds like you are using only broad match which can lead to your ads being shown on irrelevant search queries or queries that are just not related enough to the adgroup theme.

 

Have you looked at a search query report yet? If not it will be a real eye opener.  Visit your KEYWORDS tab.  Set the date range to the last 30 days and then find the See Search Terms button.  Select all to see everything and then run the report.  This report will tell you detail on exactly what was typed as a search query leading to your ads being served.   Use this report to identify new keywords to add to your account as well as identify negative keywords to add to your account.

 

Try adding your keywords in all three match types.  The goal will be for you to take traffic on the three match types and continue to watch the phrase and broad match keywords search terms report.  Keep adding negatives and eventually you will see the CTR lift on the phrase and broad match keywords.

 

Search Terms Report: http://support.google.com/adwords/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=108218

 

Keyword Match Types: http://support.google.com/adwords/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=6100

 

Negative Kyewords: http://support.google.com/adwords/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=63235

 

 

 



Kim Clink, AdWords Top Contributor | Community Profile | Twitter | Clink Digital Marketing
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the 'Best Answer.'

Re: Improving Key Word Performance

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 7
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Thanks, bondov.  Didn't mean to bust your chops. 

Re: Improving Key Word Performance

Follower ✭ ☆ ☆
# 8
Follower ✭ ☆ ☆

The broad match with modifier seems to be a great tool to weed out unrelated searches while retaining the reach of broad match. I have also added a large amount of negative keywords in the accounts that I manage. Both have boosted our clicks (while keeping them relevant) as well as our sales. We were using phrase match for a while, but when you are using phrase match for 5,000 products, the lists get a little out of hand. The searched term list has been a huge help with knowing what to add to our keywords as well as what to add to our negative keyword lists. I cannot stress enough the importance of negative keywords when using broad and phrase match.As for having them set as all three match types can  cause more issues. I will always pause the type after the new match type has been running for a day or so to give it a chance to build a higher quality score without competing against my own words. 

 

Others have posted links to help explain how to use the tools I have mentioned. I mostly wanted to let you know that their advice is great and that it has taken me almost a year to learn what works for us.

 

Another thing is that Google is constantly evolving, so once you think you have it all figured out, they introduce new features. This community has helped a bunch. I also recommend that you research info on blogs not supported by Google. Both have great information available, it just takes investing time into the research. 

 

The Google Display Network was an issue for me as well in the beginning. It killed my CTR. The most important thing is to make sure that your ad content is going to not only attract quality clicks, but to make sure it weeds out irrelevant ones. If I have a broad term that only applies to some of the people searching the term, I do not want a high CTR, I want a good Conversion rate. It's a balance. You cannot use one area of measurement for the success of your campaigns. Find what works for you and adjust as needed.

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author ohiorick
September 2015

Re: Improving Key Word Performance

Top Contributor
# 9
Top Contributor

Interesting discussion here. The original question here, from the way I read it, was how to improve CTR on keywords.

 

While it is a great idea to separate your search and display network campaigns, it is a wrong assumption that running a campaign using both networks will cause your keywords to show a low CTR. That's just not true at all. Keywords in a Display Network campaign do not accrue impressions or clicks and have absolutley no effect on the CTR data for the individual keywords.

 

Low CTR can be caused primarily by 2 things--poorly targeted keywords and poorly written ad copy. Keywords that are too broad will show your ad to people who aren't the least bit interested. Check your search terms often and add negative keywords as appropriate.

 

If your keywords are good and you show a poorly written ad, your CTR will suffer. Always write at least 2 ads for each ad group. Watch the results for long enough to get significant data, then get rid of the poorly performing ad, keep the well performing ad and write a new one to try to beat the "control". I have a couple ad groups where multiple ads perform virtually the same, so I keep both so they will rotate. But I keep writing new ads to try to beat their performance.

 

And then there is the ad position. Ads in top-of-page positions get more clicks as a rule than ads shown on the side, (not always true, but usually), but they might not convert as well as click from side position ads. It could be that your ads are showing in a low position on the side and not getting click because of that. Take a look at where your ads are showing up. With products that sell for a price between $5 and $10, you may not have enough leeway to bid higher on your keywords. That's an option you'll have to examine for yourself based on customer behaviour. If most of your customers continue to buy your products after the first purchase, it's a good idea to calculate or estimate the average lifetime value of a new customer. That might allow you to spend a bit more to bring the customer in as a sort of "loss leader".

 

Best of Luck!

 

Pere

 

petebardo -- Deadhead doing AdWords