AdWords
2.5K members online now
2.5K members online now
Improve your AdWords performance and boost your ROI, CTR, and Quality Score
Guide Me
star_border
Reply

How would you do day parting?

Follower ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Follower ✭ ✭ ✭

Hi all.

 

I know that for certain industries, certain times are more likely to convert than others.

 

So my question to you...

 

Im trying to keep my CPA under $100... and here's my conversion stats for 1 campaign (for its entire duration)

 

 

 

Here's how I would day part this.

 

Go to adwords day parting... bid onl6 60-70% for hours of the day (and days of the week) where cost/conv > $100 OR have 20+ clicks but zero conversion.

 

But I heard that sometimes people need to see your ad at different parts of the day to be "effective"..

 

What do you think? How would you do it and why?

 

2 Expert replyverified_user
2 ACCEPTED SOLUTIONS

Accepted Solutions
Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by Zee (Community Manager)
September 2015

Re: How would you do day parting?

Participant ✭ ✭ ☆
# 2
Participant ✭ ✭ ☆

Hey taewoo,

I don't think you have enough data for "statistics analysis" at the moment -
but once you have 15, or more ,conversions in 30 days I would recommend you to use the Conversion optimizer to do all the calculations for you :-)

 

learn more: http://www.google.com/ads/conversionoptimizer/

 

Cheers,
Asaf

View solution in original post

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by Zee (Community Manager)
September 2015

Re: How would you do day parting?

Badged Google Partner
# 3
Badged Google Partner

I would agree with asafpaz. Getting to that point is the hard part though. There's more effective ways to accomplish your objective other than day parting. I usually only use day parting (& bid adjustments) when - It's a local service business, where calls during operating hours are the primary goal, or, an online shopping cart (24/7) business that has months or years of historical data to obviously demonstrate the need for day parting or bid adjustments.

 

A couple of observations that stand out to me when I look at the data are:

 

The hours 0-4 are interesting. You have the lowest CTR's, and the fewest clicks, but yet, 0-1 has the lowest cost per conversion, and highest conversion rates. Hmmm.... Don't know If I would exclude those hours....

 

5-9 OK, now we got something going here. All the kpi's are fairly consistent, and you have a profitable cost/conversion.

 

10+ There is still some consistency with all the KPI's except the cost/conversion. So what's different? It looks like this is where the impressions really increase. If you have a consistent CTR, then you will get more clicks, and accrue more costs. If the conversion rates are not consistent, then the CPA is going to fluctuate. Using only time of day as the only optimization possibiblity, I would say maybe you only advertise from 5-9 or 0-9. BUT...

 

This ain't all there is to it. Smiley Happy What about the big head first.

Search or display, Google search only, or google and search partners?

Which devices give you the best CPA? 

Which combination of ad copy and landing page provide the most conversions, for what exact match terms?

Location targeting, ad rotation settings, delivery method, bid, pos., etc. are all factors. From what I am seeing, the day parting data is just not conclusive. Ideally, you would want enough data to have at least three conversions in each column, just for the sake of establishing an average baseline in every stat category.

Tom

View solution in original post

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by Zee (Community Manager)
September 2015

Re: How would you do day parting?

Participant ✭ ✭ ☆
# 2
Participant ✭ ✭ ☆

Hey taewoo,

I don't think you have enough data for "statistics analysis" at the moment -
but once you have 15, or more ,conversions in 30 days I would recommend you to use the Conversion optimizer to do all the calculations for you :-)

 

learn more: http://www.google.com/ads/conversionoptimizer/

 

Cheers,
Asaf

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by Zee (Community Manager)
September 2015

Re: How would you do day parting?

Badged Google Partner
# 3
Badged Google Partner

I would agree with asafpaz. Getting to that point is the hard part though. There's more effective ways to accomplish your objective other than day parting. I usually only use day parting (& bid adjustments) when - It's a local service business, where calls during operating hours are the primary goal, or, an online shopping cart (24/7) business that has months or years of historical data to obviously demonstrate the need for day parting or bid adjustments.

 

A couple of observations that stand out to me when I look at the data are:

 

The hours 0-4 are interesting. You have the lowest CTR's, and the fewest clicks, but yet, 0-1 has the lowest cost per conversion, and highest conversion rates. Hmmm.... Don't know If I would exclude those hours....

 

5-9 OK, now we got something going here. All the kpi's are fairly consistent, and you have a profitable cost/conversion.

 

10+ There is still some consistency with all the KPI's except the cost/conversion. So what's different? It looks like this is where the impressions really increase. If you have a consistent CTR, then you will get more clicks, and accrue more costs. If the conversion rates are not consistent, then the CPA is going to fluctuate. Using only time of day as the only optimization possibiblity, I would say maybe you only advertise from 5-9 or 0-9. BUT...

 

This ain't all there is to it. Smiley Happy What about the big head first.

Search or display, Google search only, or google and search partners?

Which devices give you the best CPA? 

Which combination of ad copy and landing page provide the most conversions, for what exact match terms?

Location targeting, ad rotation settings, delivery method, bid, pos., etc. are all factors. From what I am seeing, the day parting data is just not conclusive. Ideally, you would want enough data to have at least three conversions in each column, just for the sake of establishing an average baseline in every stat category.

Tom

Re: How would you do day parting?

Rising Star
# 4
Rising Star

*cough*

 

The hours 0-4 are interesting. You have the lowest CTR's, and the fewest clicks, but yet, 0-1 has the lowest cost per conversion, and highest conversion rates. Hmmm.... Don't know If I would exclude those hours....

 

For what it's worth, the midnight hour is the "catch-all" slot for performance data that (for whatever reason) was not able to be linked to any specific hour. Just because a lot of conversions are showing up there doesn't mean a lot of conversions took place at midnight. Doesn't mean they didn't, either, but that's not a time of day to risk the bank on.

 

Many users use a number of tools and techniques to block their search data from being tracked. There's always going to be gray areas in any data.


Theresa
Google AdWords Top Contributor
*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*

Re: How would you do day parting?

Badged Google Partner
# 5
Badged Google Partner

Ah, very interesting... Thanx for that Theresa!

Tom

Re: How would you do day parting?

Top Contributor
# 6
Top Contributor

My advice would be to be careful not to block "discovery" impressions. If somebody sees your ad at work, then back at home searches again, sees your ad again and converts, the conversion would be attributed to the time of the last click. But without the first impression, the searcher might have clicked on a competitor's ad. 

 

Go to Tools and Analysis - Conversions - Search Funnels - Path length and see how many conversions happen after more than one click, and if you have almost all of them happening after the 1st click, you can give day parting a shot. Otherwise you'll have to compare past to current data and see if day parting does not hurt more than it heals. It's pretty known that, for instance, sometimes weekend clicks seem useless and then on Monday - Tuesday sales happen.

Calin Sandici, AdWords Top Contributor | Find me on: Google+ | Twitter | LinkedIn | myBlog
Was my response helpful? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer.’ Learn how here.