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How to decrease Bounce Rate

[ Edited ]
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

I have nearly 100 percent Bounce rate

How to decrease it?

1 Expert replyverified_user

How to decrease Bounce Rate

Participant ✭ ☆ ☆
# 2
Participant ✭ ☆ ☆

Hi @Sachin W

 

Big question with a lot of possible answers. In the simplest form, i reccomend ensuring all keywords, ads, and landing pages are as relevant as possible for the user

 

https://support.google.com/adwords/answer/1722089?hl=en-GB

 

Here is the google support page for relevance. If you follow these tips, you are on your way to decreasing bounce rate i would suggest (assuming all other things equal)

 

Good luck 

 

James

How to decrease Bounce Rate

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 3
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Thanks James for giving your precious time and showing concern on my problem but I did not find any problem with the  relevancy factor which you tell. I also chat with Google Manager. But they did not found fault with my ads, keywords and landing page

How to decrease Bounce Rate

[ Edited ]
Participant ✭ ✭ ✭
# 4
Participant ✭ ✭ ✭

Can you share the mix of traffic coming into your page from PPC vs organic?  I'm assuming you have Google Analytics connected to AdWords in order to share the engagement data?

 

Usually for this sort of situation, if you share the landing page the community can provide you valuable feedback.  Since this is a public forum on the www, if you want to share it but don't want it indexed just provide it something like this:   {mylandingpageurl} with a dot net at the end

 

hth

How to decrease Bounce Rate

Top Contributor
# 5
Top Contributor

Bounce rate can be misleading...

 

Because of the way Google tracks time spent on a site and the number of pages viewed the last page a visitor is on is always counted as zero time on page - this is because Google has a timestamp for whern the visitor lands on the page but does not have one for when they leave... only when the visitor navigates to another page on the same domain does Google get another timestamp and thewn knows that the visitor has been on two pages and has spent however long on the site - wich is the amount of time spent onm the first page - i.e. the difference between the first timestamp and the second.

 

Let's suppose you have a great landing page. All the information your visitor is looking for is on that page along with a contact form and a phone number. your visitor spends half an hour reading all the information on the page and then either calls you or completes the contact form (of the sake of this illustration, let's also suppose that you don't have a "thank you" page that a visitor is taken to after the form completion.

 

Completely satisfied with your page and having the contact with you that they need they leave the page. That visit would be zero minutes and one page - a bounce.

 

Sometimes, depending upon the structure of your site and the landing page in question a bounce may simply be what you wanted a visitor to do.

 

Think about this another way - a visitor lands on your site and visits 25 pages before leaving.... is this a happy visitor - or could they simply not find what they were looking for and eventually left, frustrated?

 

There is more to engagement (and especially bounce rate) than meets the eye.

 

As @Steve B suggests, a great place to start is with a comparison between paid and organic traffic. If there are big differences between the engagement numbers of each then there is often something amiss.

How to decrease Bounce Rate

Participant ✭ ✭ ✭
# 6
Participant ✭ ✭ ✭

That's some good info @stickleback, I did not know Google computes "time on page" using timestamp differentials like that.  Very useful insights.

How to decrease Bounce Rate

Top Contributor
# 7
Top Contributor

It's important because if the last page a visitor is on is the page they entered the site (i.e. they go nowhere else) then it's a bounce and zero time on site no matter how long they were there. If you have a single page website all your visitors will be bounces at zero seconds.....

How to decrease Bounce Rate

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 8
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Steve thanks for reply on my question and showing concern on my problem. According to your reply one page website are not good for Adword marketing, there should at least 2-3 buttons or tab in the website on which user can click. But I would talk to my Adword account manager she suggested me to describe information on landing page as much as you can. So I can't understand which is the right solution for me. But overall Thanks for your reply. 

How to decrease Bounce Rate

Top Contributor
# 9
Top Contributor

No - that's not what I said... single page websites can work well - however, if you have a single page website you will have a 100% bounce rate.

 

Sometimes we get very hung up on what we read online and - in general - people will tell you that a high bounce rate is "a bad thing" - but it may not be in specific cases.

 

In your case, your concern with your high bounce rate may be unfounded.

 

This said, there will be a number which is important to you. If you are running ads to drive people to your landing page then you want them to do something when they get there - this may be to buy your product, sign up for your newsletter, call you, email you, etc. etc.

 

You should be tracking this (these) actions as conversions and your conversion rate is something you should focus on.

 

Imagine for a moment a landing page with no navigation on it - just a call to action driving people to call your business. Let's assume that you had a 50% conversion rate - i.e. 50% of visitors called you. I imagine you'd be very happy. But your bounce rate would still be 100%

 

Get your conversion tracking in place and work towards improving that. 

How to decrease Bounce Rate

[ Edited ]
Participant ✭ ✭ ✭
# 10
Participant ✭ ✭ ✭

@stickleback is correct - imo those are some very good insights for you @Sachin W.

 

Also i would add this about "landing pages":

 

Short-form landing pages with no links are "in vogue" the past couple of years, and clearly they work for some products and services. However, they are not suitable for everything - imho they are best for products or services where a quick decision on making an inquiry is likely -- e.g. for a home inspector, a plumber; or to download a white paper. 

 

There is also a "long-form" version of a landing page, more of a parallax-style page which the visitor can scroll down on; they often resemble a long-form sales letter.  Because they convey a lot more information approaching a full website, those can work better for more involved products and services which may not be well suited to "a snap decision".

 

For many products or services, a longer-form landing page or a full website is going to work better.  There is a need to more thoroughly engage the visitor and to build trust/credibility over time.  e.g. a dentist, a training firm, or a website developer would be three examples which come to mind.

 

Regarding putting links on a landing page. Currently it's in vogue to not have any links, they are derided as "conversion leaks".  However, in some situations (per above) it is beneficial for the site visitor to find more pages and information.  Per above, not everything is well suited to a quick, short, one-page "sale" or conversion. 

 

The other advantage of having links on your page is, Google will see them, follow them, and take what they find into account when assessing the quality of user experience and assigning a quality score.  I have seen a lot of single-page, short-form landing pages struggle to attain good quality scores and I believe that is one of the major reasons. Some landing page hosts offer "dynamic headline text" and other tricks to try and circumvent this, but Google is smarter than that imho. 

 

hth