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How should I go about refining keywords

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

I want to refine my keyword list and am unsure what to do with this list of keywords for example. All my ad groups start with broad match modified keywords which I then refine into phrase match, exact match, negative keywords. I'm left with lost of phrase match and broad match long tail searches and would like to know how I should ad these and whether they should be added as exact match or phrase match. Here's and example list. Any help appreciated.

 

  • covers for couches          Broad match      None
  • couch protectors              Broad match      None
  • couch cover with face hole          Phrase match    Added
  • strechy couch covers      Phrase match    None
  • couch covers uk                Phrase match    Added
  • affinity couch covers      Phrase match    None
  • couch covers cheap        Phrase match    None
  • couch cover carrier          Phrase match    None
  • osteopathic couch covers             Phrase match    None
  • teal couch cover               Phrase match    None
  • strechy couch covers at littlewoods         Phrase match    None
  • buy couch cover               Phrase match    None
  • couch covers ireland       Phrase match    None
  • wax couch cover              Phrase match    None

 

 

1 Expert replyverified_user

Re: How should I go about refining keywords

Collaborator ✭ ✭ ✭
# 2
Collaborator ✭ ✭ ✭

Hello Fraser ! Welcome to the Community !

 

"whether they should be added as exact match or phrase match"

 

First of all almost all your list is already in the phrase match, so the only question is if you should also add them in the exact match.

 

Yes you should create them also in the exact match and bid a little higher on the exact matches. If the exact matches result in a "Low search volume" you can move them in a separate ad group entitled "Low search volume" and copy the ads from the current ad group to that new ad group.

 

The main thing you should do is to install conversion tracking or configure Goal tracking from analytics, this way after a few hundred clicks you will see which keywords bring or assist conversions, and you can delete the rest of the keywords, especially after 2-3 months of testing to avoid seasonality influences on traffic.

 

This is strictly my opinion as a simple forum member, not a professional , you should wait to see what others also have to say, and decide afterwards.

Re: How should I go about refining keywords

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 3
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
Thanks Adrian,
Seems sound advice and makes sense. I shall try and see what happens.

Any other suggestions out there?

Re: How should I go about refining keywords

Top Contributor
# 4
Top Contributor

Adrian B wrote:

 

First of all almost all your list is already in the phrase match, so the only question is if you should also add them in the exact match.

 

Yes you should create them also in the exact match and bid a little higher on the exact matches. If the exact matches result in a "Low search volume" you can move them in a separate ad group entitled "Low search volume" and copy the ads from the current ad group to that new ad group.


I'll have to disagree. What Fraser seems to have pasted in there are not his keywords, but rather search terms. Those search terms matched his keywords in several ways (broad, phrase, exact).

 

I would suggest a different approach:

go through the list of search terms

sort them by impressions, descending, and have the most searched terms on top

whenever you see an irrelevant search term (which should typically have a CTR lower than your good search terms / keywords), add it as a phrase match negative. Or add only a part of it as a phrase match negative, making sure that any other search term containing that irrelevant bit will be excluded

conversely, when you see a relevant, usually higher-CTR search term, add it as a keyword, both as phrase and exact match (since you already have a keyword in broad match which triggered that term), and make sure that B < P < E, where B = bid for broad match, P = bid for phrase, and E = bid for exact.

 

Stop wherever you feel comfortable in terms of impressions, you maybe don't want to spend time on search terms which appeared three times in a week when you have others appearing a few hundred times.

 

My 2 cents, I'm sure there are other points of views as well.

 

Calin Sandici, AdWords Top Contributor | Find me on: Google+ | Twitter | LinkedIn | myBlog
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Re: How should I go about refining keywords

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 5
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
Hi Calin,

So essentially what we are saying is that for keywords derived from the original broad match modified keywords I started out with, we should ensure they are listed as broad, phrase and exact where the searches are relevant? I think that what I need to take from your comments below?

"conversely, when you see a relevant, usually higher-CTR search term, add it as a keyword, both as phrase and exact match (since you already have a keyword in broad match which triggered that term), and make sure that B < P < E, where B = bid for broad match, P = bid for phrase, and E = bid for exact."

Re: How should I go about refining keywords

Top Contributor
# 6
Top Contributor
Yes, that's my approach.

Since exact match only might not provide enough search volume, phrase match makes room for more variations which may occur. Same for broad match. Extends phrase match even further.

Of course, ideally, one should end up with an ad group with only exact matches and very relevant ads, and with enough search volume. But that never (or almost never) happens.

Here's an old post that started it all for me, regarding this approach: http://www.clickequations.com/blog/2008/12/the-match-type-series-june-2008/
Calin Sandici, AdWords Top Contributor | Find me on: Google+ | Twitter | LinkedIn | myBlog
Was my response helpful? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer.’ Learn how here.