AdWords
6.4K members online now
6.4K members online now
Improve your AdWords performance and boost your ROI, CTR, and Quality Score
Guide Me
star_border
Reply

Help finding a good account structure

[ Edited ]
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

We're a boiler installation company. We've just moved from having an agency run our Adwords to taking care of it in-house.

 

The account is a mess, no proper structure and terrible naming conventions, masses of wasted ad spend. What I want is a scalable structure.

 

There are various considerations that are making it difficult for me to decide upon a good structure.

 

  • We want to target individual towns through both geo target and search intent as separate campaigns.
  • We offer services to both domestic and commercial sectors and these should be in different campaigns (I think).
  • Three different types of boilers; gas, oil and LPG.

 

One idea is to have 6 main campaigns 

  • Gas Domestic
  • Oil Domestic
  • LPG Domestic
  • Gas Commercial
  • Oil Commercial
  • LPG Commercial

And then within those campaigns have ad groups such as 

[Campaign] Domestic_Gas Boiler > [AdGroup] Bournemouth_Gas Boiler_BMM > [keywords] +Gas +Boiler +Install +Bournemouth

 

Then the geo campaign would be [Campaign] Domestic_Gas Boiler > [AdGroup] Bournemouth GEO_Gas Boiler_BMM > [keywords] +Gas +Boiler +Install with Bournemouth as a negative keyword -Bournemouth

 

But that ultimately means within the Domestic_Gas Boiler, there will be perhaps 1,000 ad groups made up of 10 sub categories x 100 towns. Messy?

 

Any ideas would be warmly welcomed.

1 Expert replyverified_user

Re: Help finding a good account structure

[ Edited ]
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 2
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

It might also be useful to remove the whole locations by intent for now and have focus on GEO targeting. That would mean no complication for now from town/county names.

Then perhaps this structure would make sense

[Campaign] Domestic_Gas Boiler > [AdGroup] Gas Boiler_BMM > [keywords] Gas Boiler Install

I think I've been starring at this for too long now and am likely over-complicating things.

Re: Help finding a good account structure

Top Contributor
# 3
Top Contributor
Hi GG_HE,

I actually manage an account in this space and when I first read your thoughts about including every town as a possible ad group, I cringed at the amount of work involved when considering what the outcome would likely be. Your second option is likely a much better place to start.

Structure is very important but what you want to consider is how you want to be able to review/report your data (what's important to you) as well as what makes the most sense regarding topics, services and available relevant landing pages on your site.

You definitely don't want to over-complicate it, the return, especially for a local business could be very difficult to justify. Also, bear in mind,as you may know, that geo-targeting is only available at the campaign level.

As I'm sure you're aware, and something I work on all the time is deciphering what the end users will actually be searching for (search queries) - you technically understand your business as boiler installation, does your customer? What level of heater/heating related terms do you want to consider as relevant? What about HVAC related terms?

Another thing to consider is your negative keyword research and use. Did you know there is such a thing as a pasta boiler? Also, you need to think about whether or not you're providing maintenance, clean-outs, tuneups, service, repairs etc...these are all high volume search terms that can be caught in your broad match keywords.

The final thing I would suggest is to ensure you have great conversion tracking in place so you can accurately attribute your leads/sales to your campaigns. If phone calls are as or more important to you as web forms etc...than you may want to consider investing in phone call tracking.

It seems you're on the right track for sure, just wanted to share a little experience and some things I've come across in the past.

If you have any further issues/questions, don't hesitate to ask.

-Tommy
Tommy Sands, AdWords Top Contributor | Community Profile | Twitter | Philly Marketing Labs
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer.’

Re: Help finding a good account structure

[ Edited ]
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 4
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Hey Tommy, thanks for sharing your insights.

At time of taking over the account, it was a mess. But I've managed to clean it up somewhat. I've enabled call tracking and also events for the various forms and also for the live chat I installed.

Currently we're focusing on boiler installations vs repairs, so have repairs and of course other words such as "pasta" added as negatives. The agency had wasted a huge amount of money on "Boiler Room" which is a nightclub. The majority of our keywords are now BMM.

Using towns as the campaign level definitely isn't going to be manageable.

So I guess my only question is this;

If I were to go with the second option, how would you add in the searchers with intent e.g. Boiler Installation Bournemouth. I guess the above campaign would still pick it up, but I'd not have the opportunity to insert the keyword? 

 

So maybe I could setup a new campaign and set to whole of UK. Then create all town related ad groups and ads that utilise the town keyword? Then add the town keywords as negatives to the geo campaign? 

Re: Help finding a good account structure

Top Contributor
# 5
Top Contributor
Hi,

Well, personally (and not that others will not disagree), I don't very often go after location based terms unless I can show/prove added value. I'll sneak in bigger cities or frequently searched cities/towns when I can see that they're indeed performing well and have attached search volumes. By using BMM you'll likely capture these search queries without including the location terms in your keywords.

You can sprinkle them right in with your other ad groups but if you're steadfast on including them in your ad copies, you're back to a similar dilemma you faced earlier. Where do you draw the line, how many campaigns/ad groups do you dedicate. With DKI only the keyword is inserted so a broad match keyword may not always make sense.

FWIW, Location search intent is built into the AdWords targeting system.

If you review this page and expand the 3 options, you'll see some great examples of how keywords without location intent are triggered.

https://support.google.com/adwords/answer/1722038?hl=en

Wish I could provide you some better suggestions here...without data, it's hard for me to say. Have you run your Search Details reports to see if all of these cities/towns warrant being included in your keywords/ad copies? You always can use terms like local and neighborhood or counties (larger geographic areas) "serving (larger geographic area) and beyond" to capture the same essence without having to use the city/town specifically. It's a bit tough to say without knowledge as to how large of an area you're targeting, how many cities you're considering and what the historic data shows.

Hopefully, you can find some level of useful info from my ramblings. Smiley Happy

-Tommy
Tommy Sands, AdWords Top Contributor | Community Profile | Twitter | Philly Marketing Labs
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer.’

Re: Help finding a good account structure

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 6
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
Hi Tommy,

You're right. The data doesn't really warrant going after each town/service with a unique ad. Instead I should focus on Geo and use terms like "Local" to entice those specifically looking for local companies.

In my experience, I found that if somebody searches specifically for "Boiler install bournemouth", the CTR on the ad is higher if the term bournemouth is included. I think these searchers are aware of big nationwide companies such as British Gas, but are looking for a smaller, local company. But with that said, there are other, less complex ways of achieving that.

Removing the towns out of the equation infinitely simplifies the campaign structure and of course the growth.

When we expand to cover a new county, I can simply add that right in to the location target and all of the ads within that campaign will now include the new location.

I think this is the right way to go.

Thanks for the replies, they've been very useful.