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Excluding IP addresses using subnet masks

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Hello,

 

I read in the reference that it's only possible to use the wildcard for IP exclusions https://support.google.com/adwords/answer/2456098?hl=en.

The problem is that I want to add a whole subnet using the format 1.2.3.4/15 for example and when I enter it on the IP exclusions in my settings the settings are saved so I don't understand whether it's support or not.

I read all the other posts in this forum talking about regex filtering but I would like to understand whether that's really necessary.

 

Thank you.

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Accepted by Mini-CM (Community Manager)
November 2015

Re: Excluding IP addresses using subnet masks

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor
HI Stefano F,

As far as I know, regex is the only way to do it. I researched this for another forum member last week. 1.2.3.4/15 is being accepted as a regular expression because it's a valid statement, but it won't do what you want it to do. (BTW, I have idea what it would actually do, but I know it won't filter the way you want.)

Regex's are in Perl format. What that says is:

1 followed by any single character followed by 2 followed by any single character followed by 3 followed by any single character followed by 4.

I would expect the next slash to terminate the regular expression. My best guess is it only blocks 1.2.3.4, but I don't really know without testing.

Best of Luck!

Pete
petebardo -- Deadhead doing AdWords

View solution in original post

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by Mini-CM (Community Manager)
November 2015

Re: Excluding IP addresses using subnet masks

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor
HI Stefano F,

As far as I know, regex is the only way to do it. I researched this for another forum member last week. 1.2.3.4/15 is being accepted as a regular expression because it's a valid statement, but it won't do what you want it to do. (BTW, I have idea what it would actually do, but I know it won't filter the way you want.)

Regex's are in Perl format. What that says is:

1 followed by any single character followed by 2 followed by any single character followed by 3 followed by any single character followed by 4.

I would expect the next slash to terminate the regular expression. My best guess is it only blocks 1.2.3.4, but I don't really know without testing.

Best of Luck!

Pete
petebardo -- Deadhead doing AdWords

Re: Excluding IP addresses using subnet masks

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 3
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Thanks for your prompt answer.

 

Now the problem is that I cannot even enter "123\.1\.211\.[0-2]{1,3}" as excluded ip, so it seems no regex is accepted. This makes me even more confused because there are a lot of posts in this forum suggesting to use regexps.