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Exact statistics for Sitelinks

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Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

How could I find out the exact number of clicks and converions for a single sitelink? For example, in my Adwords campaings on the coulumn "Clicks" appears the same numbers of clicks, 50 clicks, and conversions, 1 conversion, for all those 3 sitelinks. Moreover, all the statistics are the same for all the sitelinks. Is there a solution for my problem?Untitled.jpg

3 Expert replyverified_user

Re: Exact statistics for Sitelinks

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Hi;

Statistics about extension performance  is available per extension. e.g  overall sitelinks perfromnce - not per a single sitelink.

 

Read more:

Measure ad extension performance

 

-Moshe

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
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Re: Exact statistics for Sitelinks

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 3
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
Ok, and how could I find out if one user converted through a click on a sitelink or through a search query?

Re: Exact statistics for Sitelinks

Top Contributor
# 4
Top Contributor
Check the article I linked;
Detailed instructions are given
Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
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Solution
Accepted by topic author The George
September 2015

Re: Exact statistics for Sitelinks

Collaborator ✭ ✭ ✭
# 5
Collaborator ✭ ✭ ✭

Hello Gabriel O,

 

As far as I know you can see exact statistics for each sitelink by clicking the Segment button and choosing "This extension vs other". On the rows "this extension" AdWords will show you individual sitelink performance such as clicks and conversions.

 

sitelinks-performance.png

Re: Exact statistics for Sitelinks

Top Contributor
# 6
Top Contributor

Adrian;

I don't think this data is reliable.

I have long been trying to understand what is   "other" in terms of sitelinks. (They are always on the top... Are  they not?)

 

And the main reason, as your own screenshot shows, is that sitelinks CTR is about the same for all sitelinks (I double checked also in my campaigns).

And the reason is that sitelinks give "presence" to the ad. Sitelinks make the ad bigger / more noticeable. But, once a user decides to click, it would not be based on the text of the a sitelink. A user would randomly click on any part of the ad.  The data (even yours) supports that. (In your data: CTR is 6.4 - 6.7)

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
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Accepted by MosheTLV (Top Contributor)
September 2015

Re: Exact statistics for Sitelinks

Top Contributor
# 7
Top Contributor
The reason that the sitellink CTR is is about the same for all stielinks is (I believe) due to the fact that if a sitlelink appears and a user clicks on the ad - wherever they click on the ad - the sitleink gets a CTR credit.

so if an ad is shown with 4 sitelinks 4 times and there is one click then the ad, and each of the sitelinks gets a 25% CTR.

Where differences come in is where either fewer than 4 sitelinks are shown in some cases - or where a user has more than 4 sitelinks and these are rotating...

so if in the previous example on two occasions two sitelinks are shown four times and two are only shown twice - and lets also assume that the click was on one of the ads where all four sitelinks were showing, then two of the sitelinks (the ones showing four times) would have a 25% CTR and the ones that only showed twice would have a 50% CTR.... if the click came on one of the ads where only two sitelinks had been displayed then the CTR's would be 25% and 0%, respectively.

This in itself, as @MosheTLV explains, makes the data unreliable since the sitelinks are present but may not be what the user clicked on.

The other related issue is that since sitelinks only appear at the top of the search results and, in general, ads in the top positions get a better CTR in any case, the CTR's for sitelinks are going to be well above average in most cases.

Re: Exact statistics for Sitelinks

Collaborator ✭ ✭ ✭
# 8
Collaborator ✭ ✭ ✭

Dear experts, Steve and Moshe, I think you are both viewing data from the perspective of the CTR from the rows of the extension title, while you should be looking at the data just from the rows "this extension" , offered by the segmentation.

 

I know that there was a time when the segment "This extension vs other" was not available but since it is now, why not using it to rethink what you knew about sitelinks CTR ?

 

@MosheTLV : you are mentioning the larger values of the CTR which appear on the row of the extension. That CTR of 6.37 % is a CTR of the entire Ad space when that extension received an impression. Of course the CTR of the AD when each extensions receives an impression is almost the same, but that is not the point. That >6% CTR is not the extension CTR, that is why google later made this segment "this extension vs other"

 

What the segmentation "This extension vs other" does, is to dig deeper in the statistics and it shows us on the row "This extension" the more detailed CTR of each particular sitelink which is as tiny as 0.02-0.15 % (look at the CTR column, inside the rows highlighted by red, to find the extension CTR, not above)

 

About "I have long been trying to understand what is   "other" in terms of sitelinks. (They are always on the top... Are  they not?)

 

My understanding is that "other" represents clicks on the headline or on other sitelinks for the selected time-frame.  If you have a single extension in an ad group and the row "this extension" shows 5 clicks and "other" shows 95 clicks, than the entire ad group must have a total of 100 clicks for that time-frame.

 

About

"as your own screenshot shows, is that sitelinks CTR is about the same for all sitelinks "  

and

"The data (even yours) supports that. (In your data: CTR is 6.4 - 6.7)"

 

My screenshot does not show this. The CTR of the first sitelink is 0.15% ( 12 clicks from 8159 imp) , the second sitelink has a CTR of 0.04% ( 3 clicks from 7933 imp) , the 3rd sitelink has a CTR of 0.02% ( 2 clicks from 8366 impression) etc etc

 

Bottom line is that reporting for individual sitelink exists in that segment and each extension gets very few clicks.

Re: Exact statistics for Sitelinks

Top Contributor
# 9
Top Contributor

Steve. @stickleback ;

I did not know that sitelinks share the credit, proportional to  the number of sitelinks shown...

Very valuable info!

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
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Re: Exact statistics for Sitelinks

Collaborator ✭ ✭ ✭
# 10
Collaborator ✭ ✭ ✭

Why are you people writing about the "sitelink CTR" when it is in effect the AD CTR in your examples ?

 

@Stickleback, please rethink the whole picture.

 

"lets also assume that the click was on one of the ads where all four sitelinks were showing, then two of the sitelinks (the ones showing four times) would have a 25% CTR and the ones that only showed twice would have a 50% CTR" -

 

A single click can be attributed to two sitelinks, As if the person has clicked in 2 places at the same time  ?

Or is it a confusion between the CTR of the AD (when those sitelinks received an impression) and the actual CTR on the sitelink text , which is only revealed by the segment "this extension vs other" ?

 

My opinion : it is not the "sitelinks text" that have 25% CTR in your example , it is the general area of the AD , when those sitelinks were displayed.

 

It can be confusing because the CTR is on the same row as the sitelink name (Before using the segmentation) but we shouldn't compare apples with oranges.