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Duplicate Keywords with Different Match Types - Good or Bad?

Follower ✭ ✭ ☆
# 1
Follower ✭ ✭ ☆

If you have the following keywords in an Ad Group advertising for a product, let's for example call it "target" product

 

[target product]

"target product"

+target +product

 

I've found that the exact match keyword has the highest conversion rate in almost all circumstances.  So it would make sense to have a higher max bid on the exact match then phrase or broad batch.  Even with lots of negative search terms to maximimize conversion on the broader matches, if the bid is the same as exact match, the cost per conversion will be much higher (too high.)

 

However in chatting with an Adwords Support Rep (on a different matter) they stated after looking through my account at the end of the chat:

 

" duplicate keywords will impact on quality score. your all keywords will compete with each other"

 

However many of the ad groups in question these duplicate keywords have quality score of 9 and 10.  So obviously if there is an effect it seems it may be minimal.

 

I thought it was pretty common for people to bid higher on more exact match and lower on more broad match.  What's the real story here?  Was this support rep not seeing the big picture?

 

2 Expert replyverified_user

Duplicate Keywords with Different Match Types - Good or Bad?

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Generally, with all other tings being equal, Google will serve the ad to the most restrictive keyword possible - so if someone runs a search for target product, then the exact match keyword should trigger the ad.

 

The rep is right insofar that the keywords "compete" with one another, but this is not a problem to worry about as this "competition" is internal i.e. the system decides which of your keywords should go forward into the wider auction with your competitors - see : https://www.en.advertisercommunity.com/t5/Articles/Are-Your-Keywords-Knights-or-Squires/ba-p/464922

 

This doesn't - as the rep may have implied - push up your cpc... 

 

There is a way to get around this and these are outlined in the article - but essentially you can set up an ad group with your exact match keywords and then have another ad group with your phrase match and add the exact version as a negative. This forces the system to use the exact ad group for the query.

 

You see, if you can get the system to recognise the exact match you might be able to actually lower your bids on the exact match without affecting your clicks and conversions. You cannot do that if the higher bid on the phrase match version is going to steal the click because the bid is higher on phrase than on exact.

 

Hope the article helps - if not post back and we can discuss further...

Duplicate Keywords with Different Match Types - Good or Bad?

Follower ✭ ✭ ☆
# 3
Follower ✭ ✭ ☆

This is more or less confirming what my educated guess was.  I actually posed the idea of having match related Ad groups and the rep said they would still compete against each other. Either way, there's no effect or significant effect on CPC as you point out, otherwise there would be a lot more people screaming about a flaw in the the auction regarding bidding on different match types.

 

So the next question becomes, how much of an actual benefit would be achieved in having separate ad groups for match types.  This obviously in a large account can significantly complicate administration so the question becomes is the benefit worth the extra complication of the account structure?  I would guess you can only answer this by actually trying it for a subset of Ad Groups as it may largely depend on how competetive the space is and the volume/cost of the clicks on the account.

Duplicate Keywords with Different Match Types - Good or Bad?

Follower ✭ ✭ ☆
# 4
Follower ✭ ✭ ☆

Hi Jeff, 

 

I agree with @stickleback.  [target product], +target +product,  "target product" - These keywords are not the same and not considered duplicate. One example of duplicate keywords - Target Product & TARGET PRODUCT. It is true that duplicate keywords compete with each other internally. Good idea is to pause/remove the duplicate keywords. 

 

In your case to achieve quality leads or quality conversions based on campaign goals, the best practice is to have the above-mentioned keywords in separate adgroups. 

 

Thanks,

Sakthi

Duplicate Keywords with Different Match Types - Good or Bad?

Rising Star
# 5
Rising Star

We had the same question earlier this month, and the response was unfortunately the same - the Google rep has got it wrong.

 

I'd love to know the source of this, whether it is just misinformation, or if Google is trying to shift advertisers towards using just broad keywords (more matching searches = more ad revenue). I say this because in AdWords Editor you get a soft warning when you have "duplicate keywords" even though they have different match types.

 

This goes against the understanding of most AdWords experts. While there are advocates for single keyword ad groups, and others like myself happily put all three in the same ad group, we all agree that you should run every match type that is profitable. 

 

 

Duplicate Keywords with Different Match Types - Good or Bad?

Top Contributor
# 6
Top Contributor

It's an interesting debate... and it seems to boil down to how much value there is in the keyword compared to the amount of work required to set up the more complex campaigns.

 

There is little doubt that the closer you can get to the searcher's intent the more likely you are to get a conversion (whatever that may be, a sale, a sign up, etc.) This is to be expected, if a person searches for something and your ad appears with exactly their search in the headline which then takes them to a landing page which has their search term in the heading, etc. then you're giving yourself a much better chance than if your ad copy and landing page are more generic; trying to be relevant to a group of keywords.

 

But setting up the ad campaign and the landing page takes time and if this is to be done for only a handful of searches a year then it may not be worth giving yourself the extra work. Equally, you have to see how much of a difference there is between the more complex structure and the simpler more inclusive structure. If the conversion rate on the broader approach is 4% and the more complex structure gets you 4.25% then, again, the extra work may not be worth doing.

 

My approach tends to be running a fairly broad keyword set to begin with and then cherry picking those keywords that perform well and putting them into their own ad group. I can then write ads that resonate really well with the keyword. If I can then see a further improvement this is the point at which I would determine that a dedicated landing page would be a good next move.