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Does adding keyword misspellings increase keyword matching?

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# 1
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Hello,

 

New to adwords, but been reading a lot and I still don't understand one concept: While google corrects for misspellings and stemming, plurals, etc., it also says it ranks keyword matching by exactness as the first priority (as in this article: http://support.google.com/adwords/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=2756257&from=66292&rd=1).  

 

So here's my question in an example.

My Keywords:

1.  hotel accommodations

2.  hotel accomodations

 

Now I understand that my Ad would pop up regardless of how the user spelled "accommodations", as again, google corrects for such things.  BUT, since google also matches for exactness of keyword search, would my misspelled keyword be a better match than my correct keyword in the case that the user misspells the search?

 

I hope that made sense.

 

Thanks!

1 Expert replyverified_user
Marked as Best Answer.
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Accepted by Zee (Community Manager)
September 2015

Re: Does adding keyword misspellings increase keyword matching?

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

 Hello Tudor; Welcome

Quote:

>>"would my misspelled keyword be a better match than my correct keyword in the case that the user misspells the search?

 

In general, ( though some exceptions) the answer is yes. The system tries to match the more specific keyword. 

 

Read more about the process of matching similar  keywords to a search term in this article:

 

How similar keywords match to search terms

http://support.google.com/adwords/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=2756257&from=66292&rd=1

 

However; be advised, that for exact match and phrase match  keywords, you can now mark the option of "misspelling". (There is a check box for that). So, the system  considers misspelling as variants of the keywords, and checks a matching with a given search term:

 

Read  more:

Using keyword matching options:

http://support.google.com/adwords/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=2497836

 

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
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Re: Does adding keyword misspellings increase keyword matching?

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# 3
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Thanks for the references and quick answer, Moshe.

 

I hope you don't mind that I add another element:

 

When a user misspells a search query, Google automatically shows search results for the proper spelling.  However, it seems that the resulting ads are triggered by the original misspelled query.

 

So although the organic search results are the same regardless of spelling, the adverts are different.  Therefore, I assume, that although google does a whole bunch of "corrections", the advertisers that reach the top are still the ones that bid on misspelled keywords.  Am I correct in my observation?

 

thanks,

 

Tudor

Marked as Best Answer.
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Accepted by topic author SEM_SAM
September 2015

Re: Does adding keyword misspellings increase keyword matching?

Top Contributor
# 4
Top Contributor

Hello again Tudor;

You are partially correct;

 

The Google search uses a prediction (Google instant) algorithm, while the AdWords applies a "matching" algorithm between a search query and a keyword. (A different question would be: which keywords triggers the ad if a number keywords match the search query.)

Both algorithms can identify misspelling: While the Google instant tries to interpret the correct meaning /intent (of a search query), AdWords tries to match the best keyword to trigger an ad.

 

 

Read more:

How similar keywords match to search terms

 

 

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
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Re: Does adding keyword misspellings increase keyword matching?

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# 5
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Thanks Moshe! That gives me better context of how this works.