AdWords
5.3K members online now
5.3K members online now
Improve your AdWords performance and boost your ROI, CTR, and Quality Score
Guide Me
star_border
Reply

Does Phrase And Exact Match Types Raise Cost?

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

I've been extremely frustrated with adwords since the day I started. The type of business I have depends on google ads get the most attention in our industry. I've set up adwords with broad match and and with $4 bid limit with "Enhanced Bidding" checked. After a while, I did start to get a few leads a day with $45 spent each day. One day google "conversion specialist" called and "helped" me optimize my campaign with different settings and conversion tracking and all of that. Hours and hours were spent and a month later, HORRIBLE results, not one conversion is tracked and leads went form few a day to few a week at the same time while spending $45 per day. But then I learned as much as I could about adwords and set up very well organized campaigns and phrase match and some broad and exact match keywords I took from search terms from my broad match campaign that was actually working. I used same ad copy and even added a couple more on top. Put $5 bid limit with "enhanced" and maximize clicks with $25 day limit. I got a few impressions and no clicks a day. A month later a few clicks and a few hundred impressions and 20 clicks but not one lead, $7.73 per click average vs $3.26 per click on a broad match campaign that actually generated clicks. What could this possibly be? Am I missing something? How much should the cost go up for phrase and exact match keywords?

1 Expert replyverified_user
1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions
Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author Aziz M
January

Re: Does Phrase And Exact Match Types Raise Cost?

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Hi @Aziz M there's no hard and fast rule that links Keyword match type to cost per click.  The cost of an individual click is decided by the auction process so the only influence match type has is that it will (probably) influence the auctions that your Keyword can enter, and therefore the competitors you may be bidding against.  For example, if one of your competitors only uses phrase matches, it's likely your phrase match Keywords will meet that competitor in an auction more often than a broad match Keyword.  If the competitor has a higher Max CPC, those Phrase match Keywords may then end up costing more, but the reverse is also true.

 

In terms of getting leads, you said you've had "a few hundred impressions and 20 clicks but not one lead".  20 clicks from "a few hundred" impressions is probably not a bad CTR (depending upon how many "a few" is), but 20 clicks probably isn't really enough to expect a lead yet.  Conversion rates vary from business to business, but a conversion rate of 5% would probably be considered healthy for many.  At a 5% conversion rate, after 20 clicks you'd only just be expecting a single conversion, and since conversions don't come along at regular intervals, precisely matching number of clicks, it's not unreasonable to see no conversions after 20.  No conversions after 100, and I'd start to be concerned, after 200, I'd be very worried.

 

Jon

AdWords Top Contributor Google+ Profile | Partner Profile | AdWords Audits

View solution in original post

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author Aziz M
January

Re: Does Phrase And Exact Match Types Raise Cost?

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Hi @Aziz M there's no hard and fast rule that links Keyword match type to cost per click.  The cost of an individual click is decided by the auction process so the only influence match type has is that it will (probably) influence the auctions that your Keyword can enter, and therefore the competitors you may be bidding against.  For example, if one of your competitors only uses phrase matches, it's likely your phrase match Keywords will meet that competitor in an auction more often than a broad match Keyword.  If the competitor has a higher Max CPC, those Phrase match Keywords may then end up costing more, but the reverse is also true.

 

In terms of getting leads, you said you've had "a few hundred impressions and 20 clicks but not one lead".  20 clicks from "a few hundred" impressions is probably not a bad CTR (depending upon how many "a few" is), but 20 clicks probably isn't really enough to expect a lead yet.  Conversion rates vary from business to business, but a conversion rate of 5% would probably be considered healthy for many.  At a 5% conversion rate, after 20 clicks you'd only just be expecting a single conversion, and since conversions don't come along at regular intervals, precisely matching number of clicks, it's not unreasonable to see no conversions after 20.  No conversions after 100, and I'd start to be concerned, after 200, I'd be very worried.

 

Jon

AdWords Top Contributor Google+ Profile | Partner Profile | AdWords Audits