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Do long tail keywords actually help adwords?

Follower ✭ ☆ ☆
# 1
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For example,

 

If I was selling baking soda powder, one of my main keywords would be "baking soda".  However, would long tail keywords where people may search for "does baking soda actually work for cleaning?" in google, if I were to add that to my keyword list, would it help in anyway? It seems the short keyword "baking soda" would capture that search as well, but is it possible that CPC cost maybe lower if it matches the long tail instead of the short keyword or any other possible benefits of having long tail to begin with?

 

Appreciate any help! Smiley Happy

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Re: Do long tail keywords actually help adwords?

Participant ✭ ✭ ☆
# 2
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Hi Philip,

Longtail normally does help, however, I wouldn't suggest bidding on questions that aren't directly answered with your product/site. For instance, someone that is searching for how baking soda works for cleaning is probably looking for DIY blogs, etc. It doesn't really mean that they want to buy baking soda. The value is in keywords like "where to buy baking soda online" and similar terms. Those types of searches are directly answered by your site where (I assume) they can buy baking soda online. Generally, if you can think of some long tail keywords, there might not be as much competition so they can be cheaper. Plus, the searcher has indicated that they are ready to buy so the conversion rate should be pretty good on those types of terms.

Hope this helps!

Re: Do long tail keywords actually help adwords?

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# 3
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I understand your logic as far as marketing purposes go. As far as how AdWord works, if I just had the term "baking soda" , then when people search "where to buy baking soda", my ad should show up just fine as well right? Would there be any advantage to adding in the long tail keyword "where to buy baking soda" and having that pickup vs the "baking soda"? (i.e. cheaper CPC?)

Re: Do long tail keywords actually help adwords?

[ Edited ]
Top Contributor
# 4
Top Contributor

When users search for "where to buy baking soda" it will not necessarily  be matched to a keyword "baking soda". Primarily, it depends on the match type, and on the other keywords on your list. (I do not want to divert the discussion to this topic, since it's a  broad one. Search the community for:  "which keyword triggers the ad")

 

As for your initial question; there is no straight answer. I would suggest  starting with the "search terms report":  check the keywords which trigger your ad. This would be the tool to analyze if long tail queries are useful for your campaign.

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
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Re: Do long tail keywords actually help adwords?

Rising Star
# 5
Rising Star

Hi Philip,

 

Hello Again!

 

To answer your 1st question : As far as how AdWords works, if I just had the term "baking soda" , then when people search "where to buy baking soda", my ad should show up just fine as well right?

 

Yes, If you target just the keyword 'baking soda' in Phrase or Broad matchtype it should trigger your ad for a query such as the one you just mentioned above. You only need to use the right matchtype to ensure this happens and also to ensure that only relevant queries trigger your ads.

 

Now the 2nd Question: Would there be any advantage to adding in the long tail keyword "where to buy baking soda" and having that pickup vs the "baking soda"? (i.e. cheaper CPC?)

 

If you do target such a long tail keywords, there are two scenarios you can face. One where such a long tail keyword does not receive too much traffic as the search volumes for the same could be low. And second, if your long tail keyword does manage to receive a good amount of traffic, it can cost you less ( this again depends on the matchtype you use and the bid you set for the keyword) but the quality of the leads recorded will be a major issue.

 

I would suggest you use the long tail keywords in your account but in restrictive matchtypes like Exact or Phrase but not in Broad, as it will improve your chances of recording better quality leads. You can also test the keyword with higher or lower bids depending on the traffic volumes you see for the keyword.

 

Hope this helps!

 

Cheers!

 

Shashank

Cheers,
Shashank Singh, AdWords Rising Star |
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Re: Do long tail keywords actually help adwords?

Top Contributor
# 6
Top Contributor

Hi Philip,

 

Just a small addition to above informative posts, you are most welcome to add the long tail keywords, but if those long tail keywords have Low Search Volume, you should either pause them or wait for sometime till those keywords become eligible to show on Google Search Network.

 

Also as Moshe pointed above, it will depend upon keyword matching option  which you are using when we talk about using baking soda as a keyword.

 

I would also suggest you to read this help center reference explaining how similar keywords match to search terms: https://support.google.com/adwords/answer/2756257?hl=en

 

My 2 cents!

Pankaj

Re: Do long tail keywords actually help adwords?

Top Contributor
# 7
Top Contributor

Hi All,

 

@Shashank,

 

I sort of differ with you on this: "I would suggest you use the long tail keywords in your account but in restrictive matchtypes like Exact or Phrase but not in Broad"

When I use long tail keywords, I generally use a broad/BMM match type. This is because I would generally see a lower search volume on long tail keywords than something like 'baking soda' in broad.

 

 

@Philip

All in all, I would recommend going ahead with addition of long tail keywords in your account because:

1. As you mentioned - generally CPCs would be much lower because the competition would be lower

2. since long tail queries means knowing the intent of the user exactly - a more customised ad messaging can be used. taking your example, if someone searches for just 'baking soda', it is difficult to understand why they maybe looking for that term and we would have to provide an ad that would be suitable for all types of users, for example, users whose actual intent was to understand the 'industrial use of baking soda' or 'removing stains using baking soda' or 'buy baking soda online' or 'is baking soda edible'... 

now.. this can be controlled by the Search terms report and negating words like 'industrial', 'stains', 'eating' etc.. if you are looking at selling baking soda online. but instead of just having baking soda in broad you could have  +buy +baking +soda... this atleast ensures that the intent of the user was to buy baking soda.

The more relevant you make your ad messaging, the better your CTRs and conversion rates would be.

 

Hope this helps!

 

Cheers,
Shweta

AdWords Top Contributor
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Re: Do long tail keywords actually help adwords?

Top Contributor
# 8
Top Contributor

Hi Philip,

 

One of the most common phrases you'll hear uttered by AdWords professionals is "it depends", and I think this thread is proving that...

 

Long-tail Keywords can help an Account, but it depends (there's that phrase) how far you go and on the nature of the Account.  For me, it's mostly a question of performance optimisation.  Let's say that out there on the Net, there are 300 people who are ready to buy baking soda every month, without fail.  You start advertising with just the single Phrase Keyword "baking soda" and, because your budget is unlimited and you have great Ads and a fantastic website, you get all 300 sales.  Your Search terms report (as mentioned by @MosheTLV ) shows that these 300 conversions came from 100 different search terms, so you could, in theory, add all these search terms and end up with 100 Keywords instead of one.  However, my experience says that of these 100 Keywords, you'll likely see 50+ where they received only one conversion over the whole month and you'll see 10 or so that account for the majority of the conversions.

 

So, what's the problem?  The problem with Keywords with only one conversion is that you really have no significance to the data.  You have no idea if that Keyword will get one conversion every month, or if that search term matching that Keyword was a one-off that won't be searched for again for another six months and maybe then won't convert.  Without this significance, you can't possibly tune the Keyword for performance.

 

So I'd advocate a balance.  Look at your search terms report over a decent period - at least a month, maybe two or more - and then look for these longer tail Keywords that have a significant number of conversions at a decent frequency and then consider adding those.  The one-offs I'd leave to be collected by your broader matches.

 

Jon

AdWords Top Contributor Google+ Profile | Partner Profile | AdWords Audits

Re: Do long tail keywords actually help adwords?

Rising Star
# 9
Rising Star
Hi Shweta,

I am all for adding long tail keywords but I generally work with clients who are mainly concerned with the quality of leads recorded and because of this, i generally tend to add long tail keywords ( if I do add them) in restrictive matchtypes so as to maintain flow of relevant leads.

Hope this clears the air. Smiley Happy

Cheers!

Shashank
Cheers,
Shashank Singh, AdWords Rising Star |
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Re: Do long tail keywords actually help adwords?

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# 10
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Thank you everyone.  Im really impressed and grateful for the super informative and highly intellectual repsonses I received so quickly.  I got a much better understanding about how to use long tail keywords now based on all of these answers combined.  I will play with a few of them to see what may happen.  Smiley Happy