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Competing keywords

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Hello,

 

A while ago I was made aware of a phenomena called keyword competition. Where keywords in one campaign that are similar can compete with one another, reducing your ad rank and increasing your bids. But what should a person do if they want their ads show for a phrase like "roof repair" but they would also like their ads to show if a user just uses the word roof alone. If you use both terms they could compete. Would it be a good idea to just use roof as a broad match? I've always wondered which is the better way to go and just how much keyword competition within one account actually impacts performance.

1 Expert replyverified_user

Re: Competing keywords

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor
Hi Michael,

>>> If you use both terms they could compete. <<<

Yeah, they could overlap in meaning and the matching search terms. If you wish to avoid that, you are advised to refrain from using broad match. List phrase or exact match keywords instead. If you do have the extra time, it will be beneficial in multiple ways.

Best,
Lakatos


Re: Competing keywords

Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆
# 3
Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆

Hi Michael,

 

It actually make sense to keep both of these keywords in the account. There is a really good answer by @AdWiser on the same type of query.

 

Here is the link: https://www.en.advertisercommunity.com/t5/Performance-Optimization/Competing-Keywords-AdWords-Rep-Ad...

Re: Competing keywords

[ Edited ]
Top Contributor
# 4
Top Contributor

Hi Michael,

Yeah, Deepak is correct regarding KW competition. That's why I did not use the term *compete* in my answer but said: "they could overlap in meaning and the matching search terms". While It does make sense to keep both of those 2 keywords, the question of match types may seem valid. I continue to think that in a scenario where keywords heavily overlap in meaning, it is more advisable to list phrase and/or broad match KWs.

Calin's answer in the referenced topic is of course epic and well worth reading ... Smiley Happy

Best,
Lakatos

Re: Competing keywords

Badged Google Partner
# 5
Badged Google Partner
First of all, I can't think of any instance where it would be a good idea to just target roof broad. But if somehow you find good performance with that word, then by all means, keep it. AdWords will match the searcher to the keyword that is most relevant; however, bids can offset these. Say you target broad match roof with a Max. CPC of $5,000 and target "roof repair" with a Max. CPC of $0.01. Do not be surprised if you see roof repair as a search term under broad match roof.

Keyword competition mostly applies when you have the same keyword in multiple AdGroups with the exact same targeting. Say you have AdGroup Roofing Company and Roofing Contractors and you have the keyword "Roofing Contracting Company" in both because you have seen it convert as a search term in both and forgot you already had it. If their bids are equal, the landing pages are the same and the ads are equally well written, AdWords will try to guess which one is the most relevant for someone who searches "Roofing Contracting Company Nebraska". If you set the bid for one at $40 and the bid for the other at $15, then it is more likely for the $40 bid to win and place in a higher position if the $15 wasn't high enough for position 1. This will result in you paying more for a higher position and the higher bid one is almost always likely to win given that they are equal in every other way.

Re: Competing keywords

Top Contributor
# 6
Top Contributor
Hi Guys,

I am quoting from Calin's post referenced by Deepak above: "There's no such thing as competing against yourself."

That's 100% correct if you consider that the term *compete* would allow one to assume that they have an impact on each other's actual CPC if the triggered ad copy gets clicked on. In fact, they don't. That's because no matter which particular KW from your account wins the opportunity to accrue an impression, the max CPC you pay when it is clicked on depends on its QS value and the AdRank of the ad right below yours on the SERP.

Some confusion is caused by advertisers who use the term *compete* differently. What they mean is that e.g. 2 KWs take part in a competition to gain an opportunity.

Best,
Lakatos