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Clicks to Conversions

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Hello,

 

I am trying to figure out how to convert clicks which I am getting on my ads to conversions (fill out a form and submit).  The topic is refinancing and the call to action is to submit the mentioned form containing general information i.e. name, address, phone number, email address, current interest rate and so on.  So when they click on the ad, it takes them to the form but I have not received any submissions.  There's interest but no action.  Any help would be appreciated.  

 

Thanks,

 

John

 

 

2 Expert replyverified_user
2 ACCEPTED SOLUTIONS

Accepted Solutions
Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by Zee (Community Manager)
September 2015

Re: Clicks to Conversions

Rising Star
# 2
Rising Star

Good afternoon - 

 

There can be many reasons for this.

 

First, you don't discuss numbers. If your campaign has driven 20-30 visitors to your site without producing any conversions, then that's not really enough data to make any decisions around. You need a statistically significant level of data. (Say - 1,000 website visitors.)

 

Compare the keywords you're using to the text of the ads they're matched with--do the ads really serve the same market as the keywords?  

 

Compare the text of the ads you're using to the content of the landing pages--whatever it is that your ads are promising, does the landing page deliver that, clearly and simply?  

 

For example, if the keyword was, "refinance now" then the ad should be about fast refinancing and the landing page should focus heavily on the speed and ease of refinancing with your company. (The "and ease" part speaks to the searcher's unspoken pain point--people perceive this process as slow and complicated.)

 

Look at your online form--do you really have to have all of that data? Is there some piece of data--or something simple, like a text box folks can use to write their specific comments--that you need to add?  Does the form ask for something that's too personal or too technical; something people are going to be reluctant to tell a "stranger"?

 

For what it's worth, I wouldn't use the form as my landing page, if it were me. I'd drive the traffic to a page on the website that speaks, as I've said above, to the ad messaging; I'd put a link to the form on that page. The industry you're in is one that people are going to want a little more information--reassurance--about your company, your services, and your abilities--before they hand you their personal info. You need to use a landing page that helps people trust you.

 

Sorry so brief--only have a minute right now but did want to offer you some ideas.  Please post again if you'd like more info and I and others can elaborate on strategies and techniques!


Theresa
Google AdWords Top Contributor
*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*

View solution in original post

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by Zee (Community Manager)
September 2015

Re: Clicks to Conversions

[ Edited ]
Top Contributor
# 3
Top Contributor

Hi John,

 

Actually Theresa managed to address every aspect you need to consider.

 

1. Do not drive traffic to the signup form. Create a separate Landing Page with plenty of compelling contents and a link to the form. Do not forget about testimonials, they are always reasuring prospects in sensitive situations.  

 

2. Even if you need lots of data from the client, make the very first step of the signup flow as easy as it can be. Do not be inquisitive before he has signed up and feels comfortable in his new account. It's like talking to your attorney in the street or in his cosy office.

 

On the form, I'd probably only ask for the email address and perhaps an amount of refinance he needs. When the address is verified and he comes back you'll have an opportunity to confront him with the rest of the questions he has to answer. The catch is that clients will be less likely to abandon you when they have already invested some efforts which is the verification of their email address in your case.

 

Please update us of your progress.

 

Best,

Lakatos

 

View solution in original post

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by Zee (Community Manager)
September 2015

Re: Clicks to Conversions

Rising Star
# 2
Rising Star

Good afternoon - 

 

There can be many reasons for this.

 

First, you don't discuss numbers. If your campaign has driven 20-30 visitors to your site without producing any conversions, then that's not really enough data to make any decisions around. You need a statistically significant level of data. (Say - 1,000 website visitors.)

 

Compare the keywords you're using to the text of the ads they're matched with--do the ads really serve the same market as the keywords?  

 

Compare the text of the ads you're using to the content of the landing pages--whatever it is that your ads are promising, does the landing page deliver that, clearly and simply?  

 

For example, if the keyword was, "refinance now" then the ad should be about fast refinancing and the landing page should focus heavily on the speed and ease of refinancing with your company. (The "and ease" part speaks to the searcher's unspoken pain point--people perceive this process as slow and complicated.)

 

Look at your online form--do you really have to have all of that data? Is there some piece of data--or something simple, like a text box folks can use to write their specific comments--that you need to add?  Does the form ask for something that's too personal or too technical; something people are going to be reluctant to tell a "stranger"?

 

For what it's worth, I wouldn't use the form as my landing page, if it were me. I'd drive the traffic to a page on the website that speaks, as I've said above, to the ad messaging; I'd put a link to the form on that page. The industry you're in is one that people are going to want a little more information--reassurance--about your company, your services, and your abilities--before they hand you their personal info. You need to use a landing page that helps people trust you.

 

Sorry so brief--only have a minute right now but did want to offer you some ideas.  Please post again if you'd like more info and I and others can elaborate on strategies and techniques!


Theresa
Google AdWords Top Contributor
*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*
Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by Zee (Community Manager)
September 2015

Re: Clicks to Conversions

[ Edited ]
Top Contributor
# 3
Top Contributor

Hi John,

 

Actually Theresa managed to address every aspect you need to consider.

 

1. Do not drive traffic to the signup form. Create a separate Landing Page with plenty of compelling contents and a link to the form. Do not forget about testimonials, they are always reasuring prospects in sensitive situations.  

 

2. Even if you need lots of data from the client, make the very first step of the signup flow as easy as it can be. Do not be inquisitive before he has signed up and feels comfortable in his new account. It's like talking to your attorney in the street or in his cosy office.

 

On the form, I'd probably only ask for the email address and perhaps an amount of refinance he needs. When the address is verified and he comes back you'll have an opportunity to confront him with the rest of the questions he has to answer. The catch is that clients will be less likely to abandon you when they have already invested some efforts which is the verification of their email address in your case.

 

Please update us of your progress.

 

Best,

Lakatos