AdWords
2.3K members online now
2.3K members online now
Improve your AdWords performance and boost your ROI, CTR, and Quality Score
Guide Me
star_border
Reply

Click Fraud

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

I have excluded a certain IP address and he/she has clicked my ad 21 times in the last three days.

He only visits the landing page. During that same period, Google only reports 3 invalid clicks. This is terrible. I can see the exact time tanyone lands on my page by using whoson. The Google employees claim they do not have the ability to see IP addresses of clicks.

Hoew can I get them to actually exclude IP addresses on the exclusion list?

 

1 Expert replyverified_user

Re: Click Fraud

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 2
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Does whoson give a unique user ID in addition to the IP address. After battling a similar problem for nearly three months and thousands of dollars, our rep recommended ClickReport.com. Detected and stopped the click fraud within a day. As far as G not knowing the IP address of the click is ridiculous. 

Re: Click Fraud

Top Contributor Alumni
# 3
Top Contributor Alumni

Good morning.

 

Although the abilty to block IP addresses is a tool some advertisers find of value, I would caution you (and anyone else who reads this thread) that it's quite common for multiple users to share a single IP address. Access companies routinely issue the same IP address to more than one of their customers, with some larger access companies reusing the same IP address thousands of times a day.

 

Unless you have some other reason to believe this one IP address was only associated with one person during the time in question, what you may have done was to block an entire group of potential customers.

 

Google uses a number of tools to identify and battle click fraud. Identifying a single IP address is, yes, fairly simple, these days. Determining whether or not multiple 'events' from one IP address were all initiated by the same user is considerably more complicated.

 

In the 7 or 8 years I've managed accounts through AdWords, I've personally found that Google tends to eliminate more clicks as 'potential fraud' than I would expect. If you were told that these clicks were not detected as "fraud" then I'm fairly certain that is correct.


Theresa
Google AdWords Top Contributor
*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*

Re: Click Fraud

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 4
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Since all of the clicks (24  to date) came from the same IP address in a very small window of time, I think it is safe to assume that this is not a case of multiple users sharing an IP address.

I have enabled the "invalid click" column. What I have found is that Google will audit and declare a certain number of invalid clicks if they are asked to investigate it.

The problem with this type of click fraud is not just potentially paying for these invalid clicks. If the perpetrator clicks it enough, my budget is exceeded and ads are not served to legitimate prospects.

Google's invalid click checking is apparently not in "real time" so budgets are crushed on a daily basis.

Re: Click Fraud

Top Contributor Alumni
# 5
Top Contributor Alumni

In fact, detecting invalid clicks is an automatic an ongoing process in all AdWords campaigns.

 

It is not, however, instant. You are correct that with a low daily budget, it's possible for invalid clicks to use up a significant percentage of your daily spend one day, taking your ads offline.

 

 


Theresa
Google AdWords Top Contributor
*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*

Re: Click Fraud

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 6
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

We now have been clicked on 40 times by the same IP address (the excluded one) in a matter of 1 1/2 weeks. I even excluded the little town in Texas that the guy is based in.   The "WhosOn" software gives me plenty of information, the most important of which is did they come from Ad-Words or not.

 

Google claims I am seeing things and this has not happened. This is the response I got from the Ad-Words team:

 

I'm sorry my prior e-mail did not get to you. Our technical team did some internal tests and can confirm that for the Campaign XXXX, the IP that you excluded (xx.xx.xxx.xxx) is not being served the ads. The IP, since it was added as an exclusion, will not be shown your ads. If you don't want it to see all of your campaigns, you would need to add it to each separately. 
 
Additionally, our team received your report regarding suspicious clicks on your AdWords ads and thank you for your patience while we researched this issue. After thoroughly reviewing your account, we did not find any evidence suggesting that invalid clicks have been charged to your account. The clicks your ads received appear to fit a pattern of normal user behavior. 


The security of AdWords advertisers is a top priority for Google. Please be assured that we will continue to monitor all clicks on your ads to prevent abuse. For more information about the steps we take to combat invalid click activity, please visit   xxxxxxx

 

Re: Click Fraud

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 7
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Further: When Iasked the Ad-Words tech why Google Analytics did not provide the IP addresses of visitors she told me that there was a legal issue regarding privacy that prevented Google from sharing this information with advertisers.

When I asked her "Where oin the web does it say this?" She back pedaled.

 

My experience with Ad-Words people is that they make things up as it suits them and that Google fosters an atmosphere of Click Fraud.

Re: Click Fraud

Top Contributor Alumni
# 8
Top Contributor Alumni

Providing IP addresses for website traffic is, indeed, a privacy problem. Google has (wisely, in my opinion) decided to err on the side of caution and they do not provide "personally identifiable" information about the people who use their services.

 

While I don't doubt that small instances of click fraud do go undetected, I believe that most click fraud is detected--Google is actually very proactive about eliminating even potentially fraudulent clicks. When a possible fraud is reported to them, they analyze the traffic in great depth. When they report it's not fraudulent, I personally have a nearly 100% confidence in that report. (As previously discussed, an IP address is not the be-all and end-all of defining an individual user on the internet. Google uses many additional "signals" to investigate potential fraud reports.)

 

I understand your frustration, really I do. I've battled the problem myself, of paying for clicks and short bursts of traffic that produced no results on a client's website.

 

I would suggest that you analyze your account from an advertiser perspective--are these unproductive clicks coming from certain keywords that might be pulling a wider range of search terms than you anticipated? Check your ad text--can you be more specific about what you're offering. And, of course, review your landing page(s) carefully. Can you make the buy/inquire process simpler? Is there some information that visitors expect/want to see on the website that they're not seeing when they reach your landing page?

 

Creating a campaign with narrowly targeted keywords, descriptive ads, and user-friendly landing pages is the key to success with AdWords.


Theresa
Google AdWords Top Contributor
*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*

Re: Click Fraud

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 9
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

I have used Ad-Words for at least 8 years and am pretty familiar with using correct keywords. THe simple fact is that one user has clicked on ads repeatedly and Google refuses to acknowledge it.

I'm pretty sure that most odf the ads he has clicked are of the PLA type.

I notice that Google hyas eliminated the ip exclusion list for PLA ads. The list was there last week but it is not there anymore.

Re: Click Fraud

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 10
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

I have learned a lot from your posts, John S. I'm battling the same problem, but was unaward how to detect the ip addresses. Now I will have to do that too. Thanks for the insight. I'm about ready to end my small budget ad campaign.