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Campaign Experiments and Splitting Traffic

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# 1
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I am trying to understand exactly how Google "splits" traffic for a campaign experiment. This is what AdWords says concerning you experiment split,

 

"Experiment split is the percentage of your campaign’s budget that’s allocated to your experiment and the percentage of ad auctions your experiment is eligible to participate in."

 

This is a little unclear to me. I'm trying to understanding if budget or percentage of auctions is being split. 

 

Any insight?

Thanks,

 

Marcus

1 Expert replyverified_user

Re: Campaign Experiments and Splitting Traffic

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor
Hi there;
You set the percentage of traffic in the experiment based on the volume of traffic to the site. (If this is a heavy traffic site, you could set a small percentage as an experiment, while if this is a low traffic site set it to 50/50).
Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
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Re: Campaign Experiments and Splitting Traffic

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# 3
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@MosheTLV and does it mean, that is I've campaign, that have 10.000 impressions / day and I create experiment 50:50, Google displays one ads 5000 and second 5000 times or will wait after both campaign will have approximately same number of clicks?

Thanks for clarification

Re: Campaign Experiments and Splitting Traffic

Top Contributor
# 4
Top Contributor

@Tomas M;

This is a statistical definition of a population and sampling.  When you chose 50/50,  the "sample" on which the test  (e.g a new version of an ad) runs  is 50% of the population (all impressions). The other 50% is the control group (i.e. no change in the ad)

In your example, the overall impressions are 10,000, out of them 50% will show the "variation" (i.e. The test ad), until  there is a difference between the test group and the control group which is stsistcaly significant (or until the test ends).

 

 

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the ‘Best Answer’