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Broad, Phrase & Exact

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# 1
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Do users ever/typically apply all 3 match types (1. broad phrase modifier, 2. phrase, and, 3. exact.) for all terms appearing in their keyword set?

 

I am ready to optimize keywords.

 

We sell access to a proprietary database online.  I have an AdWords budget of $30 per day for about 35 keyword terms. Competition for keywords is not terrible; each search term costs about $.75 per click, or less.  I use search network only.

 

I want to see how all 35 terms perform for each keyword Match Type.  So, I set-up a new draft campaign with 3 adgroups, one ad group per martch type, as follows: 1. broad (phrase modifier), 2. phrase, and 3. exact.  

 

I am hoping this campaign reveals which match types work best with which keyword terms.  Search network only.

 

Is this a reasonable campaign to trial?  Or, is this a waste somehow because each keyword term is found in each ad group  (and therefore exposed to all three possible match types!)?  Will results tell me anything?  Are there other settings to consider to find out which match type is best for particular match types?

 

I'm uncertain.

 

Thanks.

4 Expert replyverified_user
Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author ChrisatGIM
September 2015

Re: Broad, Phrase & Exact

Top Contributor Alumni
# 2
Top Contributor Alumni

HI ChrisatGIM,

 

I regularly use multiple match types of the same keywords and they will all perform differently and you might want to bid differently on them due to this.

 

One thing that I'd recommend is using negative keywords to make sure the right match type is being triggered.

 

You can add exact and phrase negative matches to your broad match adgroup so this only triggers your ads on the broad terms. The keyword diagnosis will tell you it's not showing due to a negative but don't worry aboutn that, it's just the way the system works.

 

Again with the phrase match AdGroup, add the exact negative in there to help get your stats where you need them.

 

let me know if this makes sense to you. If not, i'll try to go into more detail for you.

 

Good luck with it.

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author ChrisatGIM
September 2015

Re: Broad, Phrase & Exact

Top Contributor
# 3
Top Contributor

Hello ChrisatGIM;

 

This is a common strategy to bid on all KW match types, and to set the bid accordingly: The lowest for BBM and the highest for exact match;

 

I noticed, that you (correctly) did not list the classic "broad match" . Since the introduction of BMM, bidding on "broad match" - to my view - should be kept only to niche products. (Too many synonyms are listed under "broad match". Those synonyms that can trigger your ad against a search query you never thought about...Smiley Surprised)

 

-Moshe

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
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Re: Broad, Phrase & Exact

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 4
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hi moshe,

 my account has been suspended   on my account i can see Your Google AdWords account has been suspended because your billing information in this, or a related account could not be verified.....also i received a e-mail from google saying that While reviewing your account(149-506-7579), we found violations of our AdWords policies in this or a related account.

 

let me tell you the story

 

my same account was suspended earlier about 3 months back for not verififing billing details but it was reactivated by adword once i request them and when i created this account i by mistake put country as USA rather than india and as i was in australia so the card which i'm using on adword for the payment is on australian address under my name i have already inform google about that but still my account has been suspended so it's a humble request from me if someone here can help me   please reply...

 

thanks

yogi

Re: Broad, Phrase & Exact

Top Contributor
# 5
Top Contributor

Hi ChrisatGIM, Adam (purefuzz) and Moshe have given you advice on using the same keywords under different match types so I'll try to tackle the actual approach you're taking.

 

Personally with a new campaign I like to start small.  I'll pick a handful - and I really do mean probably fewer than 10, maybe only two or three - really tightly focused terms and let them go for a couple of days.  As Moshe has said, I'd never use the original simple broad match unless a single word was itself tightly focused and couldn't possibly be anything else so I'd stick with just Broad Match Modified, Phrase and Exact.

 

Although I start with only a very few Keywords, I won't skimp on anything else.  Set up multiple Ad Variations (at least three per Group), Ad Extensions (where possible and desirable), scheduling and so on.  Most importantly make sure you have some conversion tracking in place.  How hard this will be depends upon how your business works.  If you're selling on the site and have a "completion" page for sign-up or sale, it's relatively simple.  If your sales tend to be concluded by email or phone (or in person) it's more complex but you should try and get something in place asap.

 

After a couple of days or however long it takes you to get some decent data in terms of clicks and impressions, I'd revise the keyword situation.  By this time I should have an idea of how things are going.  If the keywords I've chosen are performing well, I'll look at any Search Query data to look for alternative/additional close matched terms I can throw in as phrase or exacts.  This report may also highlight any (additional) negatives that should be put in.  If you're not getting enough impressions/clicks, you may need to use more Keywords, reduce the tightness of the focus, or expand upon any limitations you've created (schedule, location, demographics, etc.).

 

In terms of budget (and this is why the conversion tracking is so important), you should really be focusing on Return on Investment rather than spend.  Although it's common to see people say "I have $X per day to spend", this should really only be considered a starting point that will be revised very rapidly.  Obviously if you make $50 clear net profit for each conversions and you can see within a couple of days you're getting 5 conversions a day, you can afford to increase that $30 per day budget.  Equally, if you're not seeing a positive ROI and are in fact making a per day loss, you should consider reducing the budget until you can improve performance.

 

Many advertisers seem to treat the daily budget as something that's a fixed point and unchangeable regardless of what happens in the account.  Don't be afraid to move it around to suit what's happening in your account.

 

What you'll probably end up with is a mixture.  Although it's nice to think you may end up with a nice neat set of Ad Groups all using exact matches, it's rare it'll work out that way.  Some Keywords will only ever perform well as Phrases, others only  as exacts.  Using all the types is a good way to go in the beginning but do be ready to review and change what you have running as the data rolls in.

 

Jon

AdWords Top Contributor Google+ Profile | Partner Profile | AdWords Audits

Re: Broad, Phrase & Exact

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 6
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Thanks for the help everyone!   

 

Is anyone in this thread using AdWords Editor?  There, for one Ad Group, I am hoping to set keywords to Broad Match Modifier.  On the campaign tag (campaign level), I select the "Exact and phrase matching" setting  as "Do not include close varients."  Is this all I need to do?

Marked as Best Answer.
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Accepted by topic author ChrisatGIM
September 2015

Re: Broad, Phrase & Exact

Google Employee
# 7
Google Employee

That campaign-level setting in Editor is the same as what you see in the Web interface, at the bottom of Settings tab, under "Keyword matching options" section. It is explained in more detail in this article under "How to narrow your exact match and phrase match targeting".

 

As far as I can tell, this setting has nothing to do with Broad Match Modifier (BMM). BMM is not a setting you can select from some drop-down. The way you set up BMM is by inserting plus (+) signs in front of some or all words in your keyword text (the keyword itself must have Broad match type for BMM to work, I believe).

 

You can use Editor to quickly add plus signs to your keywords. Select keywords you want to modify, then

 

1) Click Append Text link at the bottom of Keywords panel. In the dialog, select

In this column: Keyword

Add: +

Before existing text

 

Click "Append text" button, follow prompts. This puts a plus sign in front of the keyword

 

2) Click Replace Text link. In the dialog, select

Find text: (type a single space in this field)

in: Keyword

Replace with: (type a single space followed by a plus sign, like this " +" but without quotes)

 

Click "Find matches" button, follow prompts. This puts a plus sign in front of every word other than the very first one.

Re: Broad, Phrase & Exact

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 8
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PF,

 

I understand the negative KW usage.  That is interesting.  

 

So, in my BMM ad group, I would have 35 keyword phrases repeat 3 times, 105 total.  One set in the BBM format (with + signs). Then each term appears twice in the negative KW list, once as an exact match and once as phrase match type.  (And then I should disregard the keyword diagnosis saying the KW is not showing up due to a nagative.)  Is all of that correct?  

 

Thanks!

Chris 

 

 

Re: Broad, Phrase & Exact

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# 9
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So Should I add all the Keyword from Exact and Phrase Match Type in BMM Campaign.
This is the process?

Re: Broad, Phrase & Exact

Top Contributor
# 10
Top Contributor

Hi Chris, I will just add a little caution to the thread...

 

Firstly, you'll only be using the negatives in your BMM and Phrase groups, not the Exact group.  I think you've said this but I wanted to make it very clear to other readers.  Secondly you must analyse your existing data (if any) and treat this arrangement as an experiment to be followed closely.


Adwords does already have a sophisticated method of dealing with multiple matching Keywords and while the general rule is that the closest match "wins", there are exceptions when a different match may offer a cheaper CPC.  If you force a particular match type using these negatives you may actually end up paying more than you have to. 

 

It won't apply to all accounts, you need to measure and evaluate your own specific circumstances to see whether this form of match type groups and negatives is more or less effective than not using the negative match types.

 

My thanks to Pankaj for a little off-board discussion on this topic...

 

Jon

AdWords Top Contributor Google+ Profile | Partner Profile | AdWords Audits