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Branded Campaign Structure - Best Practices?

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Hi All,

 

Background: A nationwide reach client is questioning the account structure of our various branded search term campaign. The campaign in question's goal is to capture search volume of searcher's searching the sole basic variations of the brand name (i.e searches: brand name, brand name + website).

 

- Current Structure: Since this is a very simple branded campaign, our team is currently gathering all of this traffic within one campaign and one ad group. Of course, performance is strong considering searcher intent is pretty obvious. 

 

Problem: The client is pushing for a restructure. The client also mentions splitting ad groups by match type- which I believe to be useless in this campaign's case since the pros of doing so are irrelevant to the searcher's intent here.

 

Question: What are some best practices you use for branded campaigns like such? Do you break your branded campaign's ad groups out by match type?

 

Please let me know if you require more info and thank you in advance.

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Accepted by topic author Stephen H
January 2017

Branded Campaign Structure - Best Practices?

Collaborator ✭ ☆ ☆
# 2
Collaborator ✭ ☆ ☆

@Stephen H

 

Have you asked them why they want a restructure and what they believe it will accomplish? Same goes for adgroups by match type?  

 

I think breaking up adgroups by match type is just silly.  I could see a case in certain instances for multiple adgroups, and that would be ad copy related.  I'm not sure it applies to your case. An example would one adgroup would be for "brand" queries. Another adgroup would be "brand widget" queries.  

If they insist on you doing this, I think it would make an excellent opportunity for an experiment.  Make a brand only campaign with your one adgroup, and then another brand only campaign with the way they want it. Do a 50/50 split and see what happens. I doubt it there will be any significant difference. 

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Marked as Best Answer.
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Accepted by topic author Stephen H
January 2017

Branded Campaign Structure - Best Practices?

Collaborator ✭ ☆ ☆
# 2
Collaborator ✭ ☆ ☆

@Stephen H

 

Have you asked them why they want a restructure and what they believe it will accomplish? Same goes for adgroups by match type?  

 

I think breaking up adgroups by match type is just silly.  I could see a case in certain instances for multiple adgroups, and that would be ad copy related.  I'm not sure it applies to your case. An example would one adgroup would be for "brand" queries. Another adgroup would be "brand widget" queries.  

If they insist on you doing this, I think it would make an excellent opportunity for an experiment.  Make a brand only campaign with your one adgroup, and then another brand only campaign with the way they want it. Do a 50/50 split and see what happens. I doubt it there will be any significant difference. 

Branded Campaign Structure - Best Practices?

[ Edited ]
Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆
# 3
Explorer ✭ ✭ ☆

Hi Stephen, 

 

I had the same request last year in Q2 with a nationwide client!

 

 

Campaign > Structure by Product and/or videos (i.e.- 2017 Escape) 

Ad Group 1- Branded terms (i.e.- Ford Escape) 

Ad Group 2- Feature terms (i.e. small SUV) 

 

*Set specific targeting at the ad group level, not campaign level. 

 

The restructure made reporting and optimizing much smoother and easier to align with each ad. 

 

 

Hope this helps! 

-Julia

Branded Campaign Structure - Best Practices?

Rising Star
# 4
Rising Star

I recommend brand bidding to most clients, and have never seen the need to use more that one ad group. 

 

However, if there are lots of search queries for something specific, say brand + "phone number", then that could be addressed with specific ads.