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Bidding in Different Match Types

Follower ✭ ☆ ☆
# 1
Follower ✭ ☆ ☆

Can someone please let me know which keyword would be triggered in Scenario 1 and the amount that I would be charged in scenario 2?

 

 Scenario 1 
 Same bid for all keywords in the same adgroup 
  KeywordsSearch Query
 $1.00[book flights]book flights
 $1.00"book flights" 
 $1.00+book +flights 
    
 Scenario 2 
 Different bid for all keywords in the same adgroup
  KeywordsSearch Query
 $0.50[book flights online]book flights online
 $1.70"book flights" 
 $1.00+book +flights 
    

 

 

3 Expert replyverified_user

Re: Bidding in Different Match Types

[ Edited ]
Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

As a general rule and all other things being equal - Google will trigger ads using the most restrictive keyword available - so in Scenario 1 the [book flights] should trigger the ad.

However, when the bids are different this can increase the rank of a less restrictive keyword and it is likely that in Scenario 2 the "book flights" would trigger the ad.

To control this you would put your exact match in one ad group and then add the same as a negative exact match in the phrase match group.

That prevents the phrase match triggering when the exact match is searched and "forces" Google to use the exact match despite the bid being lower.

 

As to how much would be charged, that depends upon the competition from other advertisers - not from the bids within your account.

I hope that helps...

-

Re: Bidding in Different Match Types

Top Contributor
# 3
Top Contributor
The other way, which I generally use, is to make sure that from the very beginning the exact keyword has a higher bid than the phrase, which has a higher bid than the broad.

By doing this you can share the same ad group, and usually the correct match types will be applied.

Re: Bidding in Different Match Types

Follower ✭ ☆ ☆
# 4
Follower ✭ ☆ ☆
Thank you Rob. And may I know how you end up doing that.

Re: Bidding in Different Match Types

Top Contributor
# 5
Top Contributor
In my opinion only, Google tends to be too keen to favour keywords and ads. So if you have exact, phrase and match, and the first ever impression best suits the phrase, and it gets a click, Google will think wow that phrase keyword is great, 100% CTR. And then start showing it for queries that best suit the exact.

(I am exaggerating to make a point...)

Re: Bidding in Different Match Types

Follower ✭ ☆ ☆
# 6
Follower ✭ ☆ ☆
okay so what if I create a match specific campaign and run them one at a
time (broad->phrase->exact), or exact keywords with higher bid compared to
others from the beginning, will that be accurate.

Re: Bidding in Different Match Types

Top Contributor
# 7
Top Contributor
Stickleback's solution is the best and is foolproof.

One campaign.
Three ad groups: Exact, Phrase, Broad.
Add [keyword] as an exact negative in the phrase ad group.

I was only sharing an alternative way that I use.

Don't over think this, as usually Google's system does it all correctly. And if it does start using the phrase keyword for exacts, your ad is still showing, and you are still paying the lowest price - all that is affected is your ability to more easily manage the keywords.




Re: Bidding in Different Match Types

Badged Google Partner
# 8
Badged Google Partner
Exact and phrase match don't technically exist anymore. Ever since Google allowed for "close variants", the only way to know for sure what KW's show ads for which SQ's is to do the work of continually reviewing the search terms report. The more complex the account structure, the more likely something will go "wrong", because you have introduced more potential variables into the equation.

Has any match type of either of these terms terms ever resulted in a sale/lead/conversion? If so, then what match type for which term provides the best ROAS? Do you have enough budget to achieve 100% of the potential impression share for the most profitable targeting? If not, then why spend money you don't have on a structure which doesn't work?
Tom

Re: Bidding in Different Match Types

Top Contributor
# 9
Top Contributor

Hi @Vishal Joseph I'm going to disagree slightly with @stickleback here (a very rare event).  Consider the following:

 

Keyword                     Bid

"red shoes"                  $1.50

[red shoes]                   $1.00

 

If someone uses the search term red shoes, it's possible, as Steve said, that the Phrase match will be chosen as the matching Keyword because its bid is substantially higher, but what's the problem with that?  Firstly, why have you got a higher bid for the Phrase match than the Exact?  I'd suggest the only reason you'd do that is if your data shows the Phrase match to have a higher performance, if that's the case, it's going to be 3 or more word phrases that are those performers, and you should be pulling those out individually.  For example, if you get a lot of conversions from the search term red shoes online, then surely you'd add that as a Keyword in its own right, wouldn't you?  So when someone searches for that term, the issue of match type is irrelevant.

 

What I'm (struggling) to say here is that in my opinion situations where you'll bid "against" the logic of match types (giving Phrase a higher bid than Exact) are going to be rare.  They should only occur where the data shows Phrase match has a higher performance, but also where the Search Term details don't show any clear additional Keywords to add and that's probably fairly rare.  In other words, where you know "2 or more words" does better than "2 words only".

 

Bear in mind that Google's choice of matching Keyword is all about making the best choice and personally I've never found good results by ignoring (forcing) that decision.

 

Jon

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