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Are you disadvantaged by too many similarities in Ad Groups?

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

 

Hiya, I had a call from a Google rep who was offering help with optimisation for me.  I am a relatively new advertiser (about one and a half weeks, actually).  I have Ad groups with you could argue a bit of repetition with exact matches, phrase matches and broad match modifiers, in order to not miss a combo, probably a rookie error.  He suggested just sticking with the BMMs.

 

Is there a disadvantage to this kind of repetition in the ad group?  Does it drive the quality score down of a keyword, or drive the CPC up?  If so, is there a page that describes this in more detail?  Ta

 

Cheers

 

Russell

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Accepted by topic author Russell
January 2017

Are you disadvantaged by too many similarities in Ad Groups?

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Hi Russell,

 

There is nothing wrong with using all match types in the same ad group, if the ad copy is relevant to all convertible search queries.

 

AdWords account managers could be split into two camps - those who bundle all match types into one ad group, and those who give them their own ad groups. While giving them their own ad groups can make optimising easier, it won't improve performance.

 

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Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author Russell
January 2017

Are you disadvantaged by too many similarities in Ad Groups?

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

Hi Russell,

 

There is nothing wrong with using all match types in the same ad group, if the ad copy is relevant to all convertible search queries.

 

AdWords account managers could be split into two camps - those who bundle all match types into one ad group, and those who give them their own ad groups. While giving them their own ad groups can make optimising easier, it won't improve performance.

 

Are you disadvantaged by too many similarities in Ad Groups?

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 3
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

That is interesting Rob, thanks.  The Adwords dude did say (as explicitly as I could understand) that I would be affecting my CPC by having duplication in the adgroup with exact match, phrase match and BMM.  He did email me his suggestions, so I might reply and get him to provide documentation to back up his assertion.  Are they always on the ball with these things (one assumes they would be, maybe not always the case?)

Are you disadvantaged by too many similarities in Ad Groups?

Participant ✭ ☆ ☆
# 4
Participant ✭ ☆ ☆

Hi @Russell

 

I personally think I wouldn’t solely use BMM's for the medium / long term. BMM can be grat at getting impressions and finding valuable search terms to your business, which i would encourage you to add as an exact match and structure the account accordingly. There are a lot of schools of thought on account structure so I would encourage some light reading on the many threads on here addressing such possibilities.

 

If you are new to the AdWords management, bmm's only in the short term could be a great way to find out which search terms are and aren’t working for your business. I encourage you to look closely daily at the search terms, whilst adding both exact match and negative keywords to eusnure this are relavant.

 

A key benefit of using exact match will be consistency. Usually, because you know the exact term you are bidding on, you can optimise the whole experience from ad to bid to landing page and usually be fairly comfortable within a certain confidence limit how this will perform for your business (all other things being equal). Each match type used thoughtfully will allow you to understand specific characteristics and benefits to your business offering.

 

Good luck

 

James

Are you disadvantaged by too many similarities in Ad Groups?

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 5
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

That is great advice, thanks.  It made we wonder if there was an advantage to using exact match over BMM when I am being advised this by people on Google staff, but you have answered that question for me.  I still am unsure about whether I would be penalised for having [physio Grange] "physio Grange" and +physio +Grange as an example.  Mr Google seemed to think that could 'confuse' the underlying decision-making of the 'machine'.

Are you disadvantaged by too many similarities in Ad Groups?

Participant ✭ ☆ ☆
# 6
Participant ✭ ☆ ☆

Hi @Russell

 

I dont think you would be penalised if I am understanding correctly what you mean by penalised by driving down QS. I belive it is quite ok to bid on those 3 options since they could each deliver results and enter auctions for different search terms based on their match type characteristics.

 

However, by implementing a carefully thought through structure with due care added to each match type, you may be able to better manage QS performance. There isnt any panalties as i am aware. Perhaps i will term this QS optimisation.

 

It is worth refreshing the characteristics of each match type and also, there are some shcools of thought on bidding slightly less on each match type (exact being the highest) and adding negative exact match kw to your BMM campaigns. However, my advice at this early stage is to see what search terms start to make sense to you as  business and build this out after this initial test for optimisations.

 

Hope that helps a little more? There are loads of useful articles and tips on the forum if you use the search box at the top.

 

Good luck and let us know how u get on Smiley Happy

 

James

Are you disadvantaged by too many similarities in Ad Groups?

Top Contributor
# 7
Top Contributor

Keep in mind that Google advice tends to lean towards getting you to spend more.

 

Are you disadvantaged by too many similarities in Ad Groups?

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 8
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Great, thanks James.