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Advanced Match Type Strategy

Follower ✭ ✭ ☆
# 1
Follower ✭ ✭ ☆

I've built a very robust set of campaigns for a lead-gen client and was wondering if anyone has every seen success employing strategy #3 from this article?

 

http://www.ppcian.com/ppc-match-type-strategies/

 

I don't agree whole-heartedly with everything in this article, and don't believe you can blanket a strategy across multiple verticals, but tip #3 was intriguing.

 

Any feedback from you advanced AdWords users on this approach? I have the tools at hand to be able to manage the additional keyword volume that stacking in this manner requires, but I'm wondering if anyone has seen enough success to warrant the added workload.

1 Expert replyverified_user

Re: Advanced Match Type Strategy

Participant ✭ ✭ ✭
# 2
Participant ✭ ✭ ✭

Hi 

 

As far as I understand you´re talking of using negative keywords to make sure "the right" keyword triggeres an ad. For example, if you have one ad group with "the keyword" as phrase match and one with [the keyword] as exact match, you wanna be sure that if the search query is the keyword (no more no less), the exact match keyword/ad group triggers the ad.

Yes you can do this with negative keywords, but it means your account structure will grow even more - and perhaps unnecessarily - complex and it will take time that you perhaps could have spent wiser.

So, before doing that, I´d ask myself if I really have a (big, relevant) problem? Run a search query report for your phrase matched ad group - does the keyword (exact matched) ever show up? If not, or seldom, maybe your trying to solve a non-issue.

Usually you don´t even have a problem because you bid somewhat higher for [the keyword] and the system also prefers too let the most specific keyword trigger the ad.

 

Don´t misunderstand me, I´m not against the use-negatives-to-steer-traffic-strategy, I even employ it myself sometimes. But I do hesitate before I grow my account more complex than they really need to be.
Consider an account with 50+ campaigns and 500+ ad group - add negative keywords (just because they have "the wrong" match type) for each ad group and you can probably see what I mean.

Re: Advanced Match Type Strategy

Follower ✭ ✭ ☆
# 3
Follower ✭ ✭ ☆

David,

 

Great answer here and I very much appreciate your feedback. I had the same thoughts on this, but one major advantage I could see with implementing this strategy is a very high exact-match impression share. I understand that this can also be achieved by closely monitoring the search query report, using keyword expansion tools and watching the keyword opportunities that appear in the account, I personally feel that this metric as a factor in Quality Score and overall account-level performance is often overlooked.

 

I've ran a few sample tests and seem to be receiving outstanding initial QS's, which I don't look too far into considering performance will determine more accurate long-term scores, but I'm wondering if the algorithm takes a liking to how targeted this approach is. In a competitive industry where basic relevancy best practices are in use by the majority of the advertisers, my gut feeling has always been that separation is in the details.

 

While your basic best practices are weighted most heavily in Quality Score calculation, no one really knows all of the factors that encompass it. And I (probably somewhat superstitiously) tend to look too deeply into things that most would write off as "non-factors". 

 

Hoping that someone who has used this approach, and doesn't mind sharing their input Smiley Happy, can weigh in as well.

 

In any event your feedback is highly valuable, and I hope we can spark up a discussion that interests other experienced advertisers!

 

Thanks,

 

Alex

Re: Advanced Match Type Strategy

Top Contributor
# 4
Top Contributor

Hi guys;

I agree with David;

 

I think that the strategy outlined (of using the negative match type keyword to "block" another match type for the same keyword) arises because the answer for the question "when several keywords match the search query, which one triggers the ad " is not an easy one.

 

However, if one understands the logic behind that, and the algorithm the system applies, this strategy can be avoided / becomes redundant. (And the author's sentence: "...Moreover, the broad version will get some amount of phrase match traffic...... Why?... " - is not left unanswered.)

 

Understanding the algorithm requires a quiet place and a cup of coffee...Smiley Surprised ( There are about 10 scenarios):

How similar keywords match to search terms

 

-Moshe

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
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Re: Advanced Match Type Strategy

Follower ✭ ✭ ☆
# 5
Follower ✭ ✭ ☆

Moshe,

 

This is great, I hadn't dug that article out of the help center yet. Looking forward to diving deep this weekend.

 

Thanks,

 

Alex

Re: Advanced Match Type Strategy

Explorer ✭ ✭ ✭
# 6
Explorer ✭ ✭ ✭

I'll start by saying that I don't agree with #1. I don't as well for having a different group for each match type. The more groups you have, the more complexity you add in trying to manage the whole account. Imagine having 100 products, each with four ad groups (if you split both broad match types, which is what is suggested). There's no need to do this.

 

As for #3, I've heard this before, years ago in fact. As David said: making sure the right keyword triggers. There is no need for this since the system takes care of that all by itself. I think it does it better than it used to as well, not that it did a bad job before. I've never and would never use this "strategy".

 

Re: Advanced Match Type Strategy

Participant ✭ ✭ ✭
# 7
Participant ✭ ✭ ✭

Hi

 

Late reply here, but as you know New Year came in between : )

 

As David said: making sure the right keyword triggers. There is no need for this since the system takes care of that all by itself.

 

Don´t trust the system too much. I have seen many cases where the "wrong" keyword has triggered an ad. This can be due to differences in QS as well as other factors that are difficult to analyze.