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Adding physical location as a negative keyword? Clarification inside.

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# 1
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I'm contemplating an idea here of a different strategy to maximize coverage here. I'm thinking about setting up two campaigns, with these location and keyword strategies (lets assume I'm selling widgets in Austin):

 

1 — Geo-targeted to people only in my location

I would have keywords like [widgets for sale], "best widgets", etc. But I would also add Austin as a negative keyword because...

 

2 — I'd have a separate campaign set up targeting people in, searching for, or viewing content about my location.

These keywords would look like [widgets for sale austin] +austin +widgets, etc.

--

Is this strategy dumb? Or is this a good idea to target both kinds of search queries? Thanks for the help in advance. If anyone has any articles about this, please feel free to share!

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Accepted by topic author Wes M
September 2015

Re: Adding physical location as a negative keyword? Clarification insi

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# 9
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Hi Wes, as you say, so long as you're careful with your Keywords and negatives, the two Campaigns shouldn't compete and [widget for sale] - as an exact - would not match for widget for sale in austin in any case.

 

Jon

AdWords Top Contributor Google+ Profile | Partner Profile | AdWords Audits

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Re: Adding physical location as a negative keyword? Clarification insi

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# 2
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Hi Wes, doesn't sound dumb to me, it's a reasonably common approach.  Splitting out the Keywords like that will allow you to adjust performance more easily than if you had them in one Campaign.

 

One word of caution - depending upon how large an area you intend to target with the location keyword based Campaign, make sure there are no other "Austin's" in that area.  Depending upon what you're actually advertising, you may find a significant percentage of "research" clicks so be on the lookout for those.

 

Jon

AdWords Top Contributor Google+ Profile | Partner Profile | AdWords Audits

Re: Adding physical location as a negative keyword? Clarification insi

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# 3
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Hello Wes;

Since "people in my location only" is a subgroup of "people is, searching for..."  -  the two campaigns will compete, and the ad which would be triggered would be the one with the highest ad rank;

 

Furthermore; since you are Geo targeting  Austin (TX), which  is quite a big location, adding Austin as a word within keywords is a redundancy.

 

Could you elaborate on the logic behind this strategy?

Moshe, AdWords Top Contributor , Twitter | Linkedin | Community Profile | Ad-Globe
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Re: Adding physical location as a negative keyword? Clarification insi

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# 4
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Just top throw in another variable.... here's what often tends to happen:

People run a search on "widgets for sale" - and they get results from all over the place.

They realize that that was not what they actually wanted so they refine their search - and now search for "widgets for sale in austin"

your two campaigns work perfectly well for this.... but - and here is the point of my post... if your ad appears in the first set of results - be sure to include Austin in your ad copy - preferably in your headline - Widgets for sale, Austin - for example. Why? Because when people looking at the search results and realizing that they are getting results from all over the place will have Austin jumping out at them (research does show that we can spot our home town name in a list almost as quickly as we can see our own name) - your ad suddenly stands a good chance of being clicked on the first search.

Re: Adding physical location as a negative keyword? Clarification insi

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# 5
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Hi Wes,

I don't have an answer for you. But you have a very interesting question. The campaigns would compete, in the sense that only one ad can show on a SERP. The one with the higher AdRank would be chosen. If your keyword bids are the same in both campaigns, only the QS would remain as the deciding factor.

What we don't really know here is which of the targeting methods would get a higher QS for people who are located in the target area as compared to someone outside the target area using a geographic modifier. Certainly, adding the negative keyword, Austin, will help mitigate this.

But there are all the surrounding areas of Austin, whose IP addresses likely report as being in Austin, you would miss, that is, if you wish to treat these people as locals. Which ad would you want them to see?

How do you plan to distinguish between the 2 campaigns? How would the ad copy change? The landing page?

Just a few thoughts.

Best of Luck!

Pete
petebardo -- Deadhead doing AdWords

Re: Adding physical location as a negative keyword? Clarification insi

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# 6
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Cobnut, I appreciate the help here. Thank you!

Re: Adding physical location as a negative keyword? Clarification insi

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# 7
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The logic is really to have complete control over who sees the ad. This client has an incredibly high CPC industry ($15-$50).

So my logic was if I had a campaign that only served ads to people in Austin, I could use only keywords that did not include any geographical terms. Adding "austin" as a negative keyword here (I would think) would alleviate the problem of the two campaigns competing against each other. So if someone typed in anything that had "austin" in it, the other campaign's ad would serve.

I guess I'm still somewhat confused on how / why [widgets for sale] as a keyword would show for someone that typed in "widgets for sale in austin".

Re: Adding physical location as a negative keyword? Clarification insi

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# 8
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Great tips. Thank you for the insight!
Marked as Best Answer.
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Accepted by topic author Wes M
September 2015

Re: Adding physical location as a negative keyword? Clarification insi

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# 9
Top Contributor

Hi Wes, as you say, so long as you're careful with your Keywords and negatives, the two Campaigns shouldn't compete and [widget for sale] - as an exact - would not match for widget for sale in austin in any case.

 

Jon

AdWords Top Contributor Google+ Profile | Partner Profile | AdWords Audits