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Account Structure - Embedded Negatives vs Restricted Match Type

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Participant ✭ ☆ ☆
# 1
Participant ✭ ☆ ☆

Hi Community,

 

Very interesting views here on account structure and the use of embedded negatives vs tiered bidding to restrict match type.

 

I have a couple of questions if I may for clarification and opinion. 

 

Question 1, In theory, is it a suitable option to have all 3 match types within the same ad group, each at the same bid (until the data comes in where I may split out my match types or amend bids for performance optimization)?

 

For example if not using a tiered bidding strategy per match type, or an embedded negative kw system forcing the auction match type, the adwords algorithm will automatically detect which of my kw are most suitable to match the search query and therefore all match types could in theory live in the same ad group with equal bids?

 

Example

 

Ad Group 1

 

[buy red roses] £1.00
"buy red roses" £1.00
+buy +red +roses £1.00

 

The search query is buy red roses, but each may of course have different ad ranks.

 

From the adwords support center, "If you have multiple keywords that are the same, the system will prefer to use the exact match keyword. For example, if the search term is plumber, and your ad group includes both the broad match keyword plumber and exact match keyword plumber, then the system will prefer to use the exact match keyword" 

 

Question 2 - Would the search query be matched to the highest ad rank and not restrictive match type, as suggested above?

 

I know there are a few threads on here promoting a tiered bidding system, i,e $/£1.00 for exact, $£0.50 for phrase, and perhaps $£0.20 for BMM, or the use of using exact negative match kw for phrase and BMM to force the adwords algorithms into selecting a match type, but I thought I'd ask again opinions on this topic. My third question is which approach to you prefer / find works better?

 

The decision calculated by the adwords algorithm on which Keyword to use as a match takes into account a many factors and this is why it seems sensible allowing AdWords to make the decision, rather than trying to force a choice which may not be to the benefit of the Campaign.

 

Thanks for any feedback

 

James

1 Expert replyverified_user

Re: Account Structure - Embedded Negatives vs Restricted Match Type

Badged Google Partner
# 2
Badged Google Partner
Your approach makes sense. Having the 3 keywords as per below with same bids should work well. I would run this until some meaningful data builds up and then figure out whether you need to split up the ad group or not. I often will use an EXACT ad group for high performing EXACT keywords, leaving the looser "discovery" ones in a separate ad group.
So yes, start as per below, and see how you go. Doing tiered bidding is probably unnecessary complication at the early stage.
[buy red roses] £1.00
"buy red roses" £1.00
+buy +red +roses £1.00

Re: Account Structure - Embedded Negatives vs Restricted Match Type

Participant ✭ ☆ ☆
# 3
Participant ✭ ☆ ☆
Thanks Sharepower,

Its more of a concept question for thoughts to see how everyone else views this topic.

Interested in fellow views.

Thanks again

Re: Account Structure - Embedded Negatives vs Restricted Match Type

Top Contributor Alumni
# 4
Top Contributor Alumni

Good morning.

 

Although I can see sharepower's point about unnecessary complication, I wanted to say that I routinely use tiered bidding for ad serving when I'm testing different match types.

 

That is, I bid lowest for broad match, since it pulls the widest variety of searches and is least likely to have a good CPA. I bid highest for exact match since I expect that people searching on my precise keyword phrases are the mostly likely to convert.

 

I also routinely load any broad match keywords I'm using for discovery into separate Ad Groups, right from the start. I set the exact match version of the keyword as a negative in those Ad Groups, so that the system triggers my exact match keywords when they are searched. Not only does that 'funnel' the traffic the way I prefer, it allows me to accumulate data on precisely how well my exact match keywords actually perform. And it leaves the broad match keywords to serve other traffic--making them more valuable as discovery tools.

 

The thing with AdWords is that there are almost as many approaches to account management as there are account managers. Smiley Happy  Everyone does things a little bit differently.

 

Good luck!

 


Theresa
Google AdWords Top Contributor
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Re: Account Structure - Embedded Negatives vs Restricted Match Type

Badged Google Partner
# 5
Badged Google Partner
Theresa I totally agree with your strategy. It all depends on the level of sophistication of the person managing the account.

Re: Account Structure - Embedded Negatives vs Restricted Match Type

Participant ✭ ☆ ☆
# 6
Participant ✭ ☆ ☆
Hey @Theresa_Zook

Thank you kindly for the reply. I know a lot of colleagues use this approach and it works well on the whole. Conversely, I also have some colleagues who believe using embedded negatives doesn't allow the Google algorithm to best detect the most suitable kw and match type and enter that kw into the auction. There are mixed opinions within the forum also, but all make fantastic reading and insight.

Its really interesting to learn fellow peers approaches. You are indeed correct with account uniqueness, I use a lot of approaches and often there is not 1 set way best for each account.

Thanks again for sharing your thoughts. I look forward to future correspondence with you.

James