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google shopping - how to prevent clashing

Explorer ✭ ☆ ☆
# 1
Explorer ✭ ☆ ☆

Hello Everyone listening to me

As always, whenever I am in a quandary I run to you, remember the popular Bryan Adams song 'I run to you? I have been managing shopping campaign for a while now and, to beat my own trumpet, I have done well with almost all accounts I have managed, yielding great returns; I know Shopping campaigns well but not as well as some of you contributors obviously. In one such account, even though it is doing well, my client would like to scale the campaigns now. Out of 9000 SKUs & 100 s of brands available, I have created 50 Top Brand and Non-Brand campaigns (using different priority settings and negative keywords to avoid clashing). Brand and Non-brand segmentation was the easier part. 

 

Now I would like further segmentation by creating campaigns based o different categories (using either website structure or making changes in the product feed and using custom_labels to help in my pursuit. My only concern is, by doing so, almost all products will belong to one brand or the other and that would make a product's bid open from several campaigns- imagine several brands and several categories intermingling and creating a kind of labyrinth that would disturb the entire 'apple cart'. 

 

Questions:

 

1. Is it even logical on my part to think of such a strategy with the objective of scaling campaigns since there are no more apt brand campaigns left to be created, and also no campaign is limited by budget for me to increase the spend and scale that way?

 

2. How can I create the category campaigns in a manner that do not hamper the successful brand campaigns? Just for info- I have a low priority All Products campaign too. This is the question actually for which I would like as much help you could provide.

 

3. What other possible options are available to me in Google Shopping to expand number of campaigns (increase product reach)?

 

Many thanks ladies and gentleman in advance, your time and effort is appreciated with all of my heart.

 

Ajay

 

 

 

 

 

 

1 Expert replyverified_user
1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions
Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author Ajay S
September 2015

Re: google shopping - how to prevent clashing

[ Edited ]
Top Contributor
# 6
Top Contributor


business and ad goals with supportive data should likely drive campaigns --
e.g. product-lines, inventory, margins, sales, best-sellers, performance, etc.

beginning with specific goals and bid strategies is usually best --
the product-groups, ad-group, campaign, and priority, details are
simply methods to help implement those goals and strategies.

for example, if the goal is to have a specific set of products with a specific
promotional-message -- all t-shirts with a summer-sale message; then, a
separate ad-group could be used to implement that goal.

the t-shirt summer-sale is that end-goal -- not creating a new ad-group.

for example, if a goal is to implement two specific bid-strategies with two
different budgets but, without changing the (feed) data -- using multiple
campaigns with priorities is certainly one method to obtain those goals.

why give a boost to products that have no specific reason for existence --
rather than a boost, in most cases, a decrease or isolation is the goal;
that is, the remaining items under everything-else-in-all-products, that
have not been assigned a specific group and bid, based on a bid strategy,
should either be simply excluded or, placed in a separate campaign with
low priority and lower bids than all other items and all other campaigns --
at least until more actionable performance statistics can be collected.

exclusion can be done using only one campaign.

 

if there is something special that is already known about the remaining

everything-else items then, creating a boost might be the end-goal.

of course, any change should be considered carefully with assistance
from a support specialist -- especially if current results have been good;
since almost any change can effect the auction results and (adversely)
effect current performance and returns-on-investment.

View solution in original post

Re: google shopping - how to prevent clashing

[ Edited ]
Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor


(1) analyze all current statistics; then, consider an updated strategy
of bidding on multiple dimensions (attributes), not just one (brand).

for example, product-lines via product_type, google_product_category;
product state via condition; and more abstract notions such as seasonal
sales-data, profit-margins, or conversions via custom-labels.

(2) exclude specific items from everything-else, use inventory-filters,
and custom-labels to help isolate items and avoid overlap or conflicts;

consider using ad-groups carefully -- restrict ad-group creation mainly

for promotional-text, bid-modifiers, or ad-group-level negative-words.

(3) use custom-labels to continue grouping and bidding strategically
on low-performing or high-performing items based on the detailed
analysis of all performance statistics -- not just brand.

consider other strategies based on performance data, benchmarking,
impression-share-data, bid-simulation, and conversion-data analysis.

additional methods to obtain a specific goal include --

consider multiple ad-groups (only) for the following, specific, strategies:
(a) assigning ad-group-level negative keywords;
(b) assigning bid modifiers (e.g. time or device specific bids);
(c) assigning specific promotional-text to a group of items.

only use multiple shopping-campaigns for the following, specific, strategies:
(a) assigning different budgets;
(b) assigning campaign-level negative-words;
(c) more accurate geographic-targeting under a specific target-country;
(d) dayparting;
(e) bid-modifiers;
(f) using priorities to swap in or out future or past ad-campaign strategies.

otherwise, use only one shopping-campaign, one ad-group,
and multiple product-groups as a starting point to begin the
initial data analysis.

generally, be certain to contact a support specialist before making any changes --
so that a specialist can look into the account, feed, and campaign details
to help determine the best course of action for a specific bid strategy and
budget with respect to the overall advertising goals and objectives.

 

Re: google shopping - how to prevent clashing

Explorer ✭ ☆ ☆
# 3
Explorer ✭ ☆ ☆
Thank you very much Celebird for the answer, about bidding on multiple dimensions- does it mean that if I segment products as per given attributes and different bids and priority levels then there will be no conflict even if same products are listed in another campaign under different attributes like 'Brand' for example?

Re: google shopping - how to prevent clashing

[ Edited ]
Top Contributor
# 4
Top Contributor

 

first, you're welcome.

the auction selection is determined by both
bid and priority; high (priority) and bid wins.

multiple dimensions are normally accomplished
within a single campaign via multiple attributes --
having little or nothing to do with priorities.

 

there is usually no need for more than one campaign

simply to implement a multi-dimensional bid-strategy.

usually, focusing on priorities per se is not optimal --
priorities are mainly for managing one-off ad campaigns,
such as a future sales event, where conflicts are obvious
but short-term.

priorities might be used for more long-term campaigns --
but a campaign-filter is usually better at preventing such
conflicts in that situation.

generally, creating more than one shopping-campaign should only be done to
help implement a very specific goal -- such as, managing different budgets for
a specific seasonal campaign, adding specific campaign-level negative-words,
in-country geotargeting, dayparting, bid-modifiers, or a future sales event.

priorities and filters can both help prevent conflicts.

 

in those examples, a priority would likely be better at preventing conflicts
when implementing a (short-term) seasonal-campaign-budget or sales event --
whereas, a campaign-filter would likely be better at preventing conflicts
when implementing campaign-level negative-words, in-country geotargeting,
dayparting, or bid-modifiers, (long-term).

 

Re: google shopping - how to prevent clashing

Explorer ✭ ☆ ☆
# 5
Explorer ✭ ☆ ☆
Thank you once more Celebird, Just last few points, starting to get what you are saying. In the absence of very specific goals such as you mentioned, generally it is better to manage 1 campaign and segregate it with whatever attributes we deem suitable, right?

So, running multiple campaigns, in the absence of such very specific goals, would not provide any extra edge over running one big ideally segregated campaign right? I was under the impression (before this post) that multiple campaigns would give some products the push they're not getting 'All Products' campaign. If yes, then may be my problem is resolved, thanks to you, because multiple campaigns have proven quite irksome to be honest. Thanks you for your much needed help, very much appreciated.
Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author Ajay S
September 2015

Re: google shopping - how to prevent clashing

[ Edited ]
Top Contributor
# 6
Top Contributor


business and ad goals with supportive data should likely drive campaigns --
e.g. product-lines, inventory, margins, sales, best-sellers, performance, etc.

beginning with specific goals and bid strategies is usually best --
the product-groups, ad-group, campaign, and priority, details are
simply methods to help implement those goals and strategies.

for example, if the goal is to have a specific set of products with a specific
promotional-message -- all t-shirts with a summer-sale message; then, a
separate ad-group could be used to implement that goal.

the t-shirt summer-sale is that end-goal -- not creating a new ad-group.

for example, if a goal is to implement two specific bid-strategies with two
different budgets but, without changing the (feed) data -- using multiple
campaigns with priorities is certainly one method to obtain those goals.

why give a boost to products that have no specific reason for existence --
rather than a boost, in most cases, a decrease or isolation is the goal;
that is, the remaining items under everything-else-in-all-products, that
have not been assigned a specific group and bid, based on a bid strategy,
should either be simply excluded or, placed in a separate campaign with
low priority and lower bids than all other items and all other campaigns --
at least until more actionable performance statistics can be collected.

exclusion can be done using only one campaign.

 

if there is something special that is already known about the remaining

everything-else items then, creating a boost might be the end-goal.

of course, any change should be considered carefully with assistance
from a support specialist -- especially if current results have been good;
since almost any change can effect the auction results and (adversely)
effect current performance and returns-on-investment.

Re: google shopping - how to prevent clashing

Explorer ✭ ☆ ☆
# 7
Explorer ✭ ☆ ☆
That would be all Celebird, appreciate your patience and astute inputs, that would put me in good stead to take the campaigns ahead.

Ajay