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Strategy for new Google Shopping Ads Retail Campaign

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# 1
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I'm new to Google Shopping Ads so I'm trying to undrestand the best strategy to start our campaign(s).

 

We have a daily deal retail website that centers mostly around fashion apparel.

 

  1. I was thinking of setting a broad strategy with a "catch-all" ad group for "all products".
  2. Then I was thinking of setting an ad group for "categories" since we have obvious product categories (i.e., baby, maternity, etc.)
  3. Then I was thinking of setting an ad group for "brands" since we have several brands.

Is this a good strategy?

 

If so, do I need to pass those ad group names on in my product feed as custom labels?

 

1 Expert replyverified_user
1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions
Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author marcuswickes
September 2015

Re: Strategy for new Google Shopping Ads Retail Campaign

[ Edited ]
Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

 

generally, the bid strategy and promotions should

drive the campaign and ad-group structure.

bidding higher on certain brand groups (levi's, polo, etc) or product_type
categories (baby, maternity, etc.) while bidding lower on the catch-all
(everything else) group is a relatively good beginning bid-strategy.

simply base the campaign's structure on the bid strategy --
first design the bid strategy; then determine if any changes
to the feed are needed; then determine the campaign structure
to support the bid strategy.

for example, if the bid strategy is to bid higher on all
polo over levi's brand items then structure the campaign
based on that strategy -- there should be no changes

needed  to the feed since brand is a required attribute.

for example, if the bid strategy is to bid higher on baby items
but lower on outerwear items, then structure the campaign based
on that strategy -- there would be no feed changes needed unless
the current product_type values did not support those categories;

(product_type values should categorize the physical item).

for example, if the bid strategy is to bid higher on summer items
over winter items then the feed would likely need to change to
support those more abstract-groups of seasonal products -- by
including a custom_label_ attribute -- the campaign's details
should then be structured around that bid strategy.

with the new shopping campaigns most bid strategies can

be created  using existing attributes such as product_type --

but the details (should) depend on the bid strategy.

promotional information of any kind cannot be included in a feed --
so any promotional messages (free shipping, etc.) should also

help to drive the campaign's structure and details.

a parallel strategy is to keep careful watch over

how each bid strategy is performing and then

make adjustments when needed.

 

View solution in original post

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author marcuswickes
September 2015

Re: Strategy for new Google Shopping Ads Retail Campaign

[ Edited ]
Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

 

generally, the bid strategy and promotions should

drive the campaign and ad-group structure.

bidding higher on certain brand groups (levi's, polo, etc) or product_type
categories (baby, maternity, etc.) while bidding lower on the catch-all
(everything else) group is a relatively good beginning bid-strategy.

simply base the campaign's structure on the bid strategy --
first design the bid strategy; then determine if any changes
to the feed are needed; then determine the campaign structure
to support the bid strategy.

for example, if the bid strategy is to bid higher on all
polo over levi's brand items then structure the campaign
based on that strategy -- there should be no changes

needed  to the feed since brand is a required attribute.

for example, if the bid strategy is to bid higher on baby items
but lower on outerwear items, then structure the campaign based
on that strategy -- there would be no feed changes needed unless
the current product_type values did not support those categories;

(product_type values should categorize the physical item).

for example, if the bid strategy is to bid higher on summer items
over winter items then the feed would likely need to change to
support those more abstract-groups of seasonal products -- by
including a custom_label_ attribute -- the campaign's details
should then be structured around that bid strategy.

with the new shopping campaigns most bid strategies can

be created  using existing attributes such as product_type --

but the details (should) depend on the bid strategy.

promotional information of any kind cannot be included in a feed --
so any promotional messages (free shipping, etc.) should also

help to drive the campaign's structure and details.

a parallel strategy is to keep careful watch over

how each bid strategy is performing and then

make adjustments when needed.