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Segmentation in both brands/generic and device

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 1
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Hey guys,

 

So basically, up untill now we've been running two shopping campaigns only: 1 for desktop and 1 for mobile, dividing them using 100% negative bid adjustments for devices.

 

Over the last couple of days however i've been reading a lot about the benefits of segmenting the shopping campaigns into multiple campaigns (1 for brand and 1 for generic search terms) in order to be able to bid higher for brand terms.

 

Now my question is this: Will creating a brand campaign for both mobile and desktop interfer with the setup i currently have?

The structure would be:

 

Google Shopping Desktop {Brand}

Google Shopping Desktop {Generic}

Google Shopping Mobile {Brand}

Google Shopping Mobile {Generic}

 

Basically my concern is that messing with the campaign priority, which is necessary for the division from generic to brand, would mean that some searches might end up in a campaign where they do not belong.. Anyone have any advice?

 

Thanks in advance

2 Expert replyverified_user
1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions
Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author Jonas b
March 2017

Re: Segmentation in both brands/generic and device

[ Edited ]
Top Contributor
# 6
Top Contributor

all submitted data is funneled into the same linked ad-account.

submitting the same physical inventory item more than once is more generally
a policy violation and grounds for disapproval or a suspension, at any time.

separate feeds cannot be used to segment data for bidding purposes --

this can be better demonstrated when product-inventory is submitted

via google's content-api where there is no such segmentation concept.

the single registered feed can handle up to 100,000 inventory items or so.

also, multiple feeds can needlessly complicate inventory-update coordination --
multiple feeds are only required per target-country for related country details.

inventory-items can be segmented for bidding strategies via attributes.

attributes are used to segment data for campaigns, ad-groups, or product-groups.

- separate campaigns are usually best for high-level divisions such as
country, language, budgets, or priorities for temporary ad-delivery --

priorities are usually best for creating strict short-term divisions;
for example, sales, seasonality, product-trials, or similar transitions,
where the same physical-inventory-item, for the same country, will
end up within multiple shopping campaigns without any filtering  --
only the item under the highest priority-campaign with an active
budget will be eligible to bid in the auctions.

- separate ad-groups are usually best for dividing among sets of negative-words
based on search-term-reports, or very large groups or categories of inventory.

- separate product-groups are usually best for assigning specific bids
to groups of items based on attributes -- such as brand, product_type,
google_product_category, or custom-labels for more abstract groups.

as to mobile vs desktop --

for shopping-ads, the best likely course is to use the custom-label attributes.

for example, if the business-goal or bidding-strategy is to have specific sets
of physical-inventory-items show only for desktop or mobile, one possibility
would be simply use separate custom-labels for desktop and mobile -- then,
use separate ad-groups or campaigns/filters, based on the labels, to segment
out the two sets of inventory-items and apply the negative-bid-adjustments
and negative-word strategies appropriately.

note that there are downsides to such device-based segmentation --
for example, the amount of information garnered to make future
decisions may be artificially or greatly reduced.

each segmentation method has advantages and disadvantages for the outcome --
making structural changes may sometimes take awhile before showing actionable

results, positively or negatively; a best-practice is to carefully measure the actual
results against a business's goals before, during and after, any such change.

see also
https://support.google.com/adwords/topic/6275305
https://support.google.com/adwords/topic/6275311

View solution in original post

Segmentation in both brands/generic and device

Top Contributor
# 2
Top Contributor

You could add negatives to campaigns to keep traffic from falling into the wrong place.



Kim Clink, AdWords Top Contributor | Community Profile | Twitter | Clink Digital Marketing
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the 'Best Answer.'

Segmentation in both brands/generic and device

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 3
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Hi Kim,

Thank you for the quick reply.

Basically my main concern is that some of the traffic from the Desktop Generic Campaign might fall through and hit the Mobile Brand Campaign instead of the Desktop Brand Campaign when the negatives have been setup properly.

 

You think i should be able to just rely 100% on the negative bid adjustments in the settings of each campaign?

Segmentation in both brands/generic and device

Top Contributor
# 4
Top Contributor

If your desktop generic has a 100% negative mobile bid adjustment it would prevent it from hitting that desktop generic campaign but it could hit another campaign I suppose. The negatives will help.  You can review search terms reports for shopping campaigns and if you see generic terms hitting a branded campaign add negatives for them.

 

The other solution I can think of (maybe the better one) is creating multiple feeds, one brand and other other generic and then you can attach the right feed to the right campaign.



Kim Clink, AdWords Top Contributor | Community Profile | Twitter | Clink Digital Marketing
Did you find any helpful responses or answers to your query? If yes, please mark it as the 'Best Answer.'

Segmentation in both brands/generic and device

Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭
# 5
Visitor ✭ ✭ ✭

Hi Kim,

 

Thanks for the reply.

 

What i was most afraid of was traffic from the desktop campaigns hitting the mobile campaign, and what i am reading from your first solution is that it shouldn't be possible, if just i setup the 100% negative mobile adjustment in the desktop campaign and vice versa for the mobile campaign.

 

"The other solution I can think of (maybe the better one) is creating multiple feeds, one brand and other other generic and then you can attach the right feed to the right campaign."

 

I thought this wasn't possible? Can i run multiple campaigns, featuring the same products but from different ID's (making it possible to have different product title, description, etc. for another campaign - effectively making it possible to have titles optimised for brand searches and titles optimised for generic searches)?

Marked as Best Answer.
Solution
Accepted by topic author Jonas b
March 2017

Re: Segmentation in both brands/generic and device

[ Edited ]
Top Contributor
# 6
Top Contributor

all submitted data is funneled into the same linked ad-account.

submitting the same physical inventory item more than once is more generally
a policy violation and grounds for disapproval or a suspension, at any time.

separate feeds cannot be used to segment data for bidding purposes --

this can be better demonstrated when product-inventory is submitted

via google's content-api where there is no such segmentation concept.

the single registered feed can handle up to 100,000 inventory items or so.

also, multiple feeds can needlessly complicate inventory-update coordination --
multiple feeds are only required per target-country for related country details.

inventory-items can be segmented for bidding strategies via attributes.

attributes are used to segment data for campaigns, ad-groups, or product-groups.

- separate campaigns are usually best for high-level divisions such as
country, language, budgets, or priorities for temporary ad-delivery --

priorities are usually best for creating strict short-term divisions;
for example, sales, seasonality, product-trials, or similar transitions,
where the same physical-inventory-item, for the same country, will
end up within multiple shopping campaigns without any filtering  --
only the item under the highest priority-campaign with an active
budget will be eligible to bid in the auctions.

- separate ad-groups are usually best for dividing among sets of negative-words
based on search-term-reports, or very large groups or categories of inventory.

- separate product-groups are usually best for assigning specific bids
to groups of items based on attributes -- such as brand, product_type,
google_product_category, or custom-labels for more abstract groups.

as to mobile vs desktop --

for shopping-ads, the best likely course is to use the custom-label attributes.

for example, if the business-goal or bidding-strategy is to have specific sets
of physical-inventory-items show only for desktop or mobile, one possibility
would be simply use separate custom-labels for desktop and mobile -- then,
use separate ad-groups or campaigns/filters, based on the labels, to segment
out the two sets of inventory-items and apply the negative-bid-adjustments
and negative-word strategies appropriately.

note that there are downsides to such device-based segmentation --
for example, the amount of information garnered to make future
decisions may be artificially or greatly reduced.

each segmentation method has advantages and disadvantages for the outcome --
making structural changes may sometimes take awhile before showing actionable

results, positively or negatively; a best-practice is to carefully measure the actual
results against a business's goals before, during and after, any such change.

see also
https://support.google.com/adwords/topic/6275305
https://support.google.com/adwords/topic/6275311